Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for list-comprehension method or similar in Numpy to eliminate use of a for-loop eg. index_values is a Python dictionary list of lists (each list containing a different number of index values) and s is a numpy vector:

for i in range(33):
    s[index_values[i]] += 4.1

Is there a method available that allows eliminating the for-loop?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think there's a more general way than using python's list comprehensions... but if you're doing something specific, like a specific mathematical operation, there's probably a way. What are you trying to do? –  Emil Stenström Jan 1 '12 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

I don't fully understand what kind of object index_values is. But if it were an ndarray, or could be converted to an ndarray, you could just do this:

>>> s = numpy.arange(20)
>>> index_values = (numpy.random.random((3, 3)) * 20).astype('i')
>>> s[index_values] = 4
>>> s
array([ 0,  1,  4,  4,  4,  5,  6,  4,  8,  4,  4, 11, 12, 
       13,  4, 15,  4,  4,  4, 19])

Edit: But it seems that won't work in this case. On the basis of your edits and comments, here's a method I think might work for you. A random list of lists with varying lengths...

>>> index_values = [list(range(x, x + random.randrange(1, 5)))
...                 for x in [random.randrange(0,50) for y in range(33)]]

...isn't hard to convert into an array:

>>> index_value_array = numpy.fromiter(itertools.chain(*index_values), 
                                       dtype='i')

If you know the length of the array, specify the count for better performance:

>>> index_value_array = numpy.fromiter(itertools.chain(*index_values), 
                                       dtype='i', count=83)

Since your edit indicates that you want histogram-like behavior, simple indexing won't do, as pointed out by Robert Kern. So use numpy.histogram:

>>> hist = numpy.histogram(index_value_array, bins=range(0, 51))

histogram is really constructed for floating point histograms. This means that bins has to be a bit larger than expected because the last value is included in the last bin, and so 48 and 49 would be in the same bin if we used the more intuitive range(0, 50). The result is a tuple with an array of n counts and an array of n + 1 bin borders:

>>> hist
(array([2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 5, 5, 5, 3, 3, 
        3, 3, 3, 2, 1, 0, 2, 3, 3, 1, 0, 2, 3, 2, 2, 2, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 
        2, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0]), 
 array([ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,
        17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,
        34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50]))

Now we can scale the counts up by a factor of 4.1 and perform vector addition:

>>> s = numpy.arange(50, dtype='f')
>>> hist[0] * 4.1 + s
array([  8.2,   9.2,   6.1,  11.2,   8.1,   5. ,   6. ,   7. ,  12.1,
        13.1,  14.1,  15.1,  16.1,  13. ,  18.1,  19.1,  20.1,  37.5,
        38.5,  39.5,  32.3,  33.3,  34.3,  35.3,  36.3,  33.2,  30.1,
        27. ,  36.2,  41.3,  42.3,  35.1,  32. ,  41.2,  46.3,  43.2,
        44.2,  45.2,  50.3,  47.2,  44.1,  45.1,  50.2,  51.2,  52.2,
        45. ,  46. ,  47. ,  52.1,  49. ])

I have no idea if this suits your purposes, but it seems like a good approach, and should probably happen at near c speed since it uses only numpy and itertools.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the right answer for numpy arrays. The only thing to watch out for is extending this to augmented assignment. When there are repetitions in index_values, the augmented assignment won't happen repeatedly as it would in the full for loop (for reasons that are complicated to go into). So you can't use this kind of indexing for doing ad hoc histograms, as many people try to do. –  Robert Kern Jan 1 '12 at 22:38
    
index_values is a Python dictionary list of lists eg. [[3, 6, 7], [5, 7, 11, 25, 99], [8, 45]]. index_values cannot be an ndarray - sorry! –  Henry Thornton Jan 1 '12 at 22:48
    
@dbv, I think what's confusing me is "dictionary list of lists." I don't know what a "dictionary list" is. Do you mean simply a dictionary of lists? If so, why are you using ints to index it? Why not just use a list of lists? A list of lists can be passed to numpy.array to produce an ndarray of the corresponding shape like so: numpy.array([[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]]). If you must use a dictionary, you can at least gain some speed with a comprehension like so: numpy.array([d[i] for i in range(2)]). –  senderle Jan 2 '12 at 1:13
    
@dev using an ndarray to index s is almost definitely the way to go, let us know why you think you cannot turn index_values into an ndarray and maybe we can come up with a fix. Also there is a relatively simple workaround to the issue that Robert Kern raised, let me know if it's relevant in your case and I'll post the code. –  Bi Rico Jan 2 '12 at 6:44
    
guys, i'm going to delete this question later today and re-formulate as a new question. thank-you and hopefully see you on the other side. –  Henry Thornton Jan 2 '12 at 12:58

What about:

s[reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, [index_values[x] for x in range(33)], [])] = 4.1
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, noticed it and edited accordingly :) –  Ricardo Cárdenes Jan 1 '12 at 22:32
    
see comment under Tadeck. Thanks! –  Henry Thornton Jan 1 '12 at 22:58
    
Under Tadeck? :? Can't see any Tadek at the moment :) (people keeps removing their answers and it's difficult to keep track!) –  Ricardo Cárdenes Jan 1 '12 at 23:05
    
Yeah, just saw that @Tadeck's answer has been removed. I've edited the original question above to show that the Numpy vector s is updated in-place. –  Henry Thornton Jan 1 '12 at 23:22
    
Yeah, of course. My comment on @Tadeck's answer was on the use he was making of comprehensions and filter, not on the final result. Of course I understand you intend to modify parts of s, not to create a new array :) –  Ricardo Cárdenes Jan 1 '12 at 23:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.