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An object created in a second object is not being dealloc'd when the second object is dealloc'd unless I set the pointer to nil in the dealloc, which doesn't seem right.

I thought ARC was supposed to set all pointers to nil by default when the object is dealloc'd, thereby releasing any owned objects.

Here is my code (just to core):

@interface Obj1 : NSObject
{
    Obj2 *obj2;   
}

@interface Obj2 : NSObject
{
}

@implementation Obj1

-(void)dealloc
{
    obj2 = nil;  // <--- This is needed to get obj2 to be dealloc'd.
    NSLog(@"Obj1 dealloc");
}

-(id)init
{
    if ((self = [super init]) == nil)
        return nil;

    obj2 = [[Obj2 alloc] init];

    return self;
}

@end

@implementation Obj2

-(void)dealloc
{
    NSLog(@"Obj2 dealloc");
}

-(id)init
{
    if ((self = [super init]) == nil)
        return nil;

    return self;
}

@end

Am I doing something wrong? Everything I've read says this should work. No one else is holding into obj2 since setting it to nil releases it. I've tried the code with and without the dealloc functions just in case it was messing something up and I get the same results.

The files in question are being compiled as obj-c++, but I'm not doing anything with c++ and the object.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
OK, I found the problem. I had Enable Zombie Objects set. I'm surprised that that was keeping the object from being deleted if it wasn't set to nil. I thought Zombie Objects were just put in place of the object after it was deleted. If it never calls the dealloc, that could cause some other bigger issues. –  Roger Gilbrat Jan 2 '12 at 0:09

1 Answer 1

This should definitely work the way you expect it to work. You're probably doing something by accident in code that you've obfuscated or clipped from your example. To demonstrate, you can save the code below to some file, e.g., arc_tst.m, compile it and run it from the terminal. You'll see that it prints out all the expected log statements and then ends up by deallocating both objects. The objects are exactly as modeled in your example code posted here (demonstrating that the issue is most likely in some other part of your actual code).

To compile it, assuming you've named it arc_tst.m, change to the directory where the file is saved, then enter the following:

$ clang -fobjc-arc -o arc_tst arc_tst.m -framework foundation
$ ./arc_tst

arc_tst.m

// build with: clang -fobjc-arc -o arc_tst arc_tst.m -framework foundation

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@class Obj1, Obj2;

@interface Obj1 : NSObject
{
  Obj2* _obj2;
}

@end

@interface Obj2 : NSObject
{
}

@end

@implementation Obj1

- (id)init
{
  if( (self = [super init]) )
  {
    _obj2 = [[Obj2 alloc] init];
  }
  return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
  NSLog(@"Obj1 Dealloc");
}

@end

@implementation Obj2

- (id)init
{
  if( (self = [super init]) )
  {
  }
  return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
  NSLog(@"Obj2 Dealloc");
}

@end

int main (int argc, char const *argv[])
{
 @autoreleasepool {
  Obj1* obj = [[Obj1 alloc] init];
  NSLog(@"after alloc, have obj1: %@", obj);
  sleep(2);
  NSLog(@"after sleep, have obj1: %@", obj);
  obj = nil; // force ARC to trash obj
  NSLog(@"after nil on obj1, about to exit");
 }
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code example works as you describe. I just can't figure out what I'm doing in my code. My Obj1 is being deallocated, but the Obj2 is not unless I set it to nil. I am compiling my code as obj-c++, I don't know if that would make any difference. –  Roger Gilbrat Jan 1 '12 at 22:53
    
@RogerGilbrat Hmm... that may very well make a difference. I added the tag to the question but you may want to update your question to say more precisely how you're using this code and how it's interacting with C++ code. –  Jason Coco Jan 1 '12 at 23:02
    
It's not interactive with c++ code at all. The only thing I use c++ for is to be able to overload pure c functions based on param type. That's it. The object not being deleted is doing nothing with c++. All that is pure obj-c. –  Roger Gilbrat Jan 1 '12 at 23:05
    
@RogerGilbrat Well that is strange. Clang actually supports C++ like overloading of C functions without using C++. You might want to check that out and see if it fixes it? clang.llvm.org/docs/LanguageExtensions.html#overloading-in-c –  Jason Coco Jan 1 '12 at 23:11
    
Oh, that's very useful. Thanks for that tip. –  Roger Gilbrat Jan 1 '12 at 23:14

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