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How do I find the largest 10 files in a given directory, with Perl or Bash?

EDIT:

  • I need this to be recursive.
  • I only want to see large files, no large directories.
  • I need this to work on Mac OS X 10.6 ('s version of find).
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2  
do you need this to be recursive ? –  huitseeker Jan 1 '12 at 23:27
1  
I need others to write code for me, too! –  matthias krull Jan 2 '12 at 18:00
1  
Not my intention; I was only trying to find the best solution. –  qazwsx Jan 2 '12 at 19:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This prints the 10 largest files recursively from current directory.

find . -type f -printf "%s %p\n" | sort -nr | awk '{print $2}' | head -10
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How to also print out their sizes to verify the result are correct? –  qazwsx Jan 2 '12 at 0:24
2  
$ find . -type f -printf "%s %p\n" | sort -nr | head -10 works. –  qazwsx Jan 2 '12 at 0:25
1  
Actually this doesn't work on Mac OS X. It doesn't have a printf option. –  qazwsx Jan 2 '12 at 0:42
1  
@user001 without using -printf option, you can try this: find . -type f -ls | awk '{print $7" "$11}' | sort -nr | head -10 –  ouah Jan 2 '12 at 1:11
    
find . -type f -ls | awk '{print $7" "$11}' | sort -nr | head -10 prints nothing. –  qazwsx Jan 25 '12 at 16:17
$ alias ducks
alias ducks='du -cs * |sort -rn |head -11'
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Doesn't this output include subdirectories? –  mob Jan 1 '12 at 23:32
    
This incorrectly lists directories too. –  qazwsx Jan 25 '12 at 16:18

This is a way to do it in perl. (Note: Non-recursive version, according to earlier version of the question)

perl -wE 'say for ((sort { -s $b <=> -s $a } </given/dir/*>)[0..9]);'

However, I'm sure there are better tools for the job.

ETA: Recursive version, using File::Find:

perl -MFile::Find -wE '
    sub wanted { -f && push @files, $File::Find::name }; 
    find(\&wanted, "/given/dir"); 
    @files = sort { -s $b <=> -s $a } @files; 
    say for @files[0..9];'

To check file sizes, use e.g. printf("%-10s : %s\n", -s, $_) for @files[0..9]; instead.

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Tanks for giving the Perl solution. I am wondering if this has significantly different memory footprint from the solution using find? –  qazwsx Jan 2 '12 at 16:10
    
@user001 I don't know how find works internally, so I cannot say. It may also vary depending on your file system and number of files. You'd need to try it out and see. –  TLP Jan 2 '12 at 20:24

How about this -

find . -type f -exec ls -l {} + | awk '{print $5,$NF}' | sort -nr | head -n 10

Test:

[jaypal:~/Temp] find . -type f -exec ls -l {} + | awk '{print $5,$NF}' | sort -nr | head -n 10
8887 ./backup/GTP/GTP_Parser.sh
8879 ./backup/Backup/GTP_Parser.sh
6791 ./backup/Delete_HIST_US.sh
6785 ./backup/Delete_NORM_US.sh
6725 ./backup/Delete_HIST_NET.sh
6711 ./backup/Delete_NORM_NET.sh
5339 ./backup/GTP/gtpparser.sh
5055 ./backup/GTP/gtpparser3.sh
4830 ./backup/GTP/gtpparser2.sh
3955 ./backup/GTP/temp1.file
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This is not a solution to what I asked. It outputs a bunch of directories. –  qazwsx Jan 3 '12 at 1:24
    
Sorry about that. Have updated the answer. –  jaypal singh Jan 3 '12 at 2:20
    
It prints nothing. –  qazwsx Jan 25 '12 at 16:19
1  
@user001 I have added sample output from the one-liner tested on Mac OSX Lion –  jaypal singh Jan 25 '12 at 16:22
    
Thanks, it works correctly. I ran it in a wrong directory where there were no file. –  qazwsx Jan 25 '12 at 16:45

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