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Basically I want to go from -1 to 1 in n steps, including -1 and 1:

x = -1.0
n = 21

for i in range(n):
    print x
    x += 0.01

-1.0 -0.9 -0.8 ... 0.8 0.9 1.0

How can I write this in the most elegant, simplest way for any n value?

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2  
related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/8652006 –  juliomalegria Jan 2 '12 at 3:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
startValue = -1.0
intervalLength = 2.0
numberOfSteps = 14
increasePerStep = intervalLength / numberOfSteps

print startValue

x = startValue
for i in range (numberOfSteps):
    x += increasePerStep
    print x


-1.0
-0.857142857143
-0.714285714286
-0.571428571429
-0.428571428571
-0.285714285714
-0.142857142857
-2.22044604925e-16
0.142857142857
0.285714285714
0.428571428571
0.571428571429
0.714285714286
0.857142857143
1.0
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Michael, why did you delete this one? I use this one and it seems to work. Is there a potential problem with this one? :O –  Joan Venge Jan 2 '12 at 3:54
1  
@JoanVenge I thought I saw a problem, and then rechecked it a minute ago and found there was no problem, so I undeleted it. –  Michael Berkowski Jan 2 '12 at 3:55
    
Thanks man, I like this kind of cool simple tricks. –  Joan Venge Jan 2 '12 at 3:58
    
how is this more elegant than the one proposed by @JoanVenge? both have magic numbers (0.01 and 2.0) –  juliomalegria Jan 2 '12 at 4:12
    
"both have magic numbers (0.01 and 2.0)" still more magic is 14 –  joaquin Jan 2 '12 at 9:31

There is no built-in solution, but probably a good way to solve it is to define your own range function:

def my_range(start, end, how_many):
    incr = float(end - start)/(how_many - 1)
    return [start + i*incr for i in range(how_many)]

And you can use it in a for-loop:

>>> for i in my_range(-1, 1, 10):
...   print i
... 
-1.0
-0.777777777778
-0.555555555556
-0.333333333333
-0.111111111111
0.111111111111
0.333333333333
0.555555555556
0.777777777778
1

EDIT: As @NiklasBaumstark suggested, if your brand new my_range function is going to handle a big quantity of numbers it is probably a good idea to use generators. For that purpose, we'll do just a little modification:

def my_xrange(start, end, how_many):
        incr = float(end - start)/(how_many - 1)
        return (start + i*incr for i in xrange(how_many))
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6  
You should really use a generator there instead of creating a temporary list. –  Niklas B. Jan 2 '12 at 3:38
    
@NiklasBaumstark: you're totally right, I'll add it to my answer –  juliomalegria Jan 2 '12 at 4:00

If it's OK to use numpy, this works fine:

import numpy as np
n = 21

for i in np.linspace(-1, 1, n):
    print i
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I would go with

for x in xrange(n):
    print float(2*x)/(n-1) - 1

Two things of interest: xrange is more efficient than range, and there's no need to have two separate iterator variables.

You could wrap this in a function if you find it frequently useful:

def linspace1(n):
    for x in xrange(n):
        yield float(2*x)/(n-1) - 1

although you'd probably want to make the lower and upper limits parameters as well, as in julio.alegria's answer.

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You said you had your answer, but I feel that this is an elegant solution. It also eliminates the possibility of weird floating-point issues (at least, from the defined range). It combines the power and flexibility of generators along with string formatting and floating-point values. Alternatively, you could avoid much of this if you elected to go with the Decimal module - but that would require a bit more tweaking.

def decimal_stepper(start, end, step=0.1):
    while start <= end:
        yield float(start)
        start = float(('%' + str(step) + 'f') % (start+step))

An example run:

myVals = decimal_stepper(-1, 1)
for x in myVals:
    print x

Which outputs:

-1.0
-0.9
-0.8
-0.7
-0.6
-0.5
-0.4
-0.3
-0.2
-0.1
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7 
0.8
0.9
1.0
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