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I am having some trouble converting a a hexcode to an NSColor. Note this is for a Mac App (hence the NSColor instead of UIColor). This is the code I have so far:

- (NSColor *) createNSColorFromString:(NSString *)string {
NSString* hexNum = [string substringFromIndex:1];
NSColor* color = nil;
unsigned int colorCode = 0;
unsigned char red, green, blue;
if (string) {
    NSScanner* scanner = [NSScanner scannerWithString:hexNum];
    (void) [scanner scanHexInt:&colorCode];
}
red = (unsigned char) (colorCode >> 16);
green = (unsigned char) (colorCode >> 8);
blue = (unsigned char) (colorCode);
color = [NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:(float)red / 0xff green:(float)green / 0xff blue:(float)blue / 0xff alpha:1.0];
return color;

}

Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Can you include an example of the value of string? –  Andrew Madsen Jan 2 '12 at 3:42
    
And from that input, what values are you getting in red, green, and blue? –  Peter Hosey Jan 2 '12 at 3:46
    
Sure. string = #339966 –  mdominick Jan 2 '12 at 3:46
    
The output for the above value is 0.2 0.6 0.4 1 with the last one beng an alpha. –  mdominick Jan 2 '12 at 4:06
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1 Answer

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+ (NSColor*)colorWithHexColorString:(NSString*)inColorString
{
    NSColor* result = nil;
    unsigned colorCode = 0;
    unsigned char redByte, greenByte, blueByte;

    if (nil != inColorString)
    {
         NSScanner* scanner = [NSScanner scannerWithString:inColorString];
         (void) [scanner scanHexInt:&colorCode]; // ignore error
    }
    redByte = (unsigned char)(colorCode >> 16);
    greenByte = (unsigned char)(colorCode >> 8);
    blueByte = (unsigned char)(colorCode); // masks off high bits

    result = [NSColor
    colorWithCalibratedRed:(CGFloat)redByte / 0xff
    green:(CGFloat)greenByte / 0xff
    blue:(CGFloat)blueByte / 0xff
    alpha:1.0];
    return result;
    }

It doesn't take alpha values into account, it assumes values like "FFAABB", but it would be easy to modify.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm I seem to get the same values as with mine: 0.2 0.6 0.4 1 that seems very wrong to me... –  mdominick Jan 2 '12 at 4:05
    
@mdominick Those look like the right values for 0x339966. 0x33 = 51, and 51/255 = 0.2. 0x99 = 153, 153/255 = 0.6. 0x66 = 102, 102/255 = 0.4. What values were you expecting? –  Caleb Jan 2 '12 at 4:09
    
Whoops you're right @Caleb. For some reason I was expecting to get 51,153,52.... Thanks for your help folks. A little sad to think that I was right and have been staring at this for hours... –  mdominick Jan 2 '12 at 4:15
1  
@mdominick I'm sure you're not the first to make that mistake. Just remember that NSColor uses components that are floats between 0 and 1. –  Caleb Jan 2 '12 at 4:19
2  
So what was wrong with the questioner's code, and why is this code better? –  Peter Hosey Jan 2 '12 at 18:48
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