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I have a unit right triangle and a value at each of the 3 vertices. I need to interpolate to find the value at a point inside the triangle. Hours of searching have turned up nothing that actually tells me how to do this. Here is my closest attempt, which is actually pretty close but not quite right -

                result = 
                v1 * (1 - x) * (1 - y) +
                v2 * x * (1 - y) +
                v3 * x * y;

v1, v2, and v3 are the values at the 3 vertices of the triangle. (x, y) is the point in the triangle that you are trying to find the value of.

Any kind of method would help me here. It doesn't necessarily need to be a unit/right triangle.

Updated info: I have a grid of evenly spaced points and a value at each point. I make a triangle out of the nearest 3 points on the grid. Here is a picture to illustrate it - enter image description here
So I have to interpolate between 5, 3, and 7 to find the value of x. The point could also be inside the other triangle, meaning you would interpolate between 5, 7, and the value of the bottom left corner of the square.

In the code I showed, v1 = 5, v2 = 3, v3 = 7.
x is the fractional distance (range [0-1]) in the "x" direction, and y is the fractional distance in the "y" direction.
In the picture's example, x would probably be about 0.75 and y would be about 0.2

Here are my closest attempts -
enter image description here
Created using -

        if (x > y) //if x > y then the point is in the upper right triangle
            return
                v1 * (1 - x) * (1 - y) +
                v2 * x * (1 - y) +
                v3 * x * y;
        else //bottom left triangle
            return
                v1 * (1 - x) * (1 - y) +
                v4 * (1 - x) * y +
                v3 * x * y;

And another attempt -
enter image description here
Created using -

if (x > y)
            return
                (1 - x) * v1 + (x - y) * v2 + y * v3;
        else
            return
                (1 - y) * v1 + (y - x) * v4 + x * v3;

They're both close to what I need but obviously not quite right.

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So which vertex is which? Show me how your coordinate system works, which way x and y go and where v1 v2 and v3 are. –  Dan Jan 2 '12 at 5:01
    
@Dan Ok I updated some info to tell what I'm doing a bit more in depth. –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 5:21
    
Do you have a specific interpretation method in mind? Linear/bilinear/nearest neighbor? –  rsaxvc Jan 2 '12 at 5:47
    
I'm going for linear/bilinear. Nearest neighbor won't work. –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 5:56
    
Does triangle actually matter here? Would a 4-point interpolation do? –  rsaxvc Jan 2 '12 at 6:13
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4 Answers 4

Ok, so we will do a linear interpolation, assuming that the gradient is constant with respect to x and to y. d/dx = v2 - v1 and d/dy = v3 - v2, and f(0,0) = v1. We have a simple two dimensional differential equation.

d{f(x,y)} = (v2 - v1)*dx
f(x,y) = (v2 - v1)*x + g(y)
d{f(x,y)} = g'(y) = (v3 - v2)*dy
g(y) = (v3 - v2)*y + C
f(x,y) = (v2 - v1)*x + (v3 - v2)*y + C
f(0,0) = v1 = (v2 - v1)*0 + (v3 - v2)*0 + C = C
f(x,y) = (v2 - v1)*x + (v3 - v2)*y + v1

or in terms of v1 v2 and v3

f(x,y) = (1 - x)*v1 + (x - y)*v2 + y*v3

If you want to do it in a square for four vertices, as above with v4 in the bottom left at x=0 y=1, here are the conditions: d/dx = (v2 - v1) (1 - y) + (v3 - v4) y, d/dy = (v3 - v2) x + (v4 - v1) (1 - x), f(0,0) = v1

d/dx = (v2 - v1) (1 - y) + (v3 - v4) y
f(x,y) = (v2 - v1) (1 - y) x + (v3 - v4) y x + g(y)
d/dy = (v3 - v2) x + (v4 - v1) (1 - x) = -(v2 - v1) x + (v3 - v4) x + g'(y)
v3 - v2 + (v4 - v1) / x + v4 - v1 = -v2 + v1 + v3 - v4 + g'(y) / x
(v4 - v1) / x + 2*(v4 - v1) = g'(y) / x
g'(y) = (v4 - v1) + 2 x (v4 - v1)
g(y) = (v4 - v1) (1 + 2 x) y + C
f(x,y) = (v2 - v1) (1 - y) x + (v3 - v4) y x + (v4 - v1) (1 + 2 x) y + C
f(0,0) = (v2 - v1) (1 - 0) 0 + (v3 - v4) 0 0 + (v4 - v1) (1 + 2 0) 0 + C = v1
f(x,y) = (v2 - v1) (1 - y) x + (v3 - v4) y x + (v4 - v1) (1 + 2 x) y + v1
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So assuming this will get the right value, I also have to account for the points that won't be in the upper right triangle, and will instead be in the lower left part of the square. So I also need a v4. I tried this - if (x > y) //if the point is in the upper right triangle return (1 - x) * v1 + (x - y) * v2 + y * v3; else //if the point is in the lower left triangle return (1 - x) * v1 + (x - y) * v4 + y * v3; But it's not working –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 6:06
    
What kind of gradient /is/ this that you're trying to generate? If you want to do it based on a square then it's a bit more complicated because d/dx = (v2 - v1) (1 - y) + (v3 - v4) y and d/dy = (v3 - v2) x + (v4 - v1) (1 - x). It's still possible. –  Dan Jan 2 '12 at 6:10
    
Not quite sure what you're asking, but it's a smoothed noise function I'm making. I have it working using the full square and doing bilinear interpolation, similar to perlin noise, but I'm trying to get it to work using triangles instead of squares. –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 6:19
    
I found a very close method but the artifacts are pretty bad. picture –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 7:00
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I found the best way to do it, though there will still be some artifacts. It looks impossible to have a perfect triangular interpolation unless you are using a unit triangle, but this is close. This is based on barycentric coordinates.

                if (x > y)
                {
                    b1 = -(x - 1);
                    b2 = (x - 1) - (y - 1);
                    b3 = 1 - b1 - b2;
                    return
                        v1 * b1 +
                        v2 * b2 +
                        v3 * b3;
                }
                else
                {
                    b1 = -(y - 1);
                    b2 = -((x - 1) - (y - 1));
                    b3 = 1 - b1 - b2;
                    return
                        v1 * b1 +
                        v4 * b2 +
                        v3 * b3;
                }
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Say, could you post a picture of the result for comparison? –  rsaxvc Jul 22 '13 at 2:22
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Here is some pseudocode for nearest-neighbor:

if( dist( p, p1 ) <= dist( p, p2 ) && dist( p, p1 ) <= dist( p, p3 ) )
  return val( p1 )
if( dist( p, p2 ) <= dist( p, p3 ) && dist( p, p2 ) <= dist( p, p1 ) )
  return val( p2 )
if( dist( p, p3 ) <= dist( p, p1 ) && dist( p, p3 ) <= dist( p, p2 ) )
  return val( p3 )

I think this also generates a voronoi diagram

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I need some form of linear interpolation because nearest neighbor will just produce big squares of color –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 5:57
    
Not squares. It would only generate squares when using sampling points at square locations, and you specified triangles. –  rsaxvc Jan 2 '12 at 6:09
    
Sorry I mean it will make big solid colored triangles* –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 6:22
    
No, it would not. It will have big solid colored areas though, but not triangles - this would generate 4 sided shapes. For a point, it would make two sides being half the outer edges of the triangle, and two perpendicular bisectors of lines to the other points. –  rsaxvc Jan 2 '12 at 6:35
    
Ah ok. I haven't tested it out, but the point is it won't fit the job. –  Frobot Jan 2 '12 at 6:39
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Actually the simplest and most robust solution is based on barycentric coordinates -

http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/383804/calculate-uv-coordinates-of-3d-point-on-plane-of-m.html

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