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I wrote the code below.

I cannot find any error in it.

But

say $valid $1;

does not work. $valid file is empty when the program finishes.

What's wrong?

Thanks in advance! ^^

#!/usr/bin/perl
use 5.012;
use strict;
use warnings;
use LWP::Simple;

open my $input, '<', 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\addrHDP.txt' or die "Cannot read: $!\n";
open my $valid, '<', 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\valid.txt' or die "Cannot read: $!\n";
my @totalReport;
my $eachAddr;
my $copyFile;
my $copyFilePath = 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\HADOOP XML\\';
my $tempFile;
my $tempFilePath = 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\temp.txt';
my $analyzed;
my $analyzedPath = 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\analyzed - HADOOP.txt';
my $undefCheck;
my $i = 0;
my $j = 0;
my $title = 'temp';
my $dup = 0;

while(<$input>) { chomp; push @totalReport, $_; }
foreach(@totalReport)
{
    $eachAddr = $_;
    $undefCheck = get($eachAddr);
    if(defined($undefCheck) == 0) { next; }

    # Copy one XML file to 'temp.txt' and then close the file.
    open $tempFile, '>', $tempFilePath or die "Cannot open 1: $!\n";
    print $tempFile get($eachAddr);
    close $tempFile;

    # If the entry is a duplicate, go on to the next entry
    open $tempFile, '<', $tempFilePath or die "Cannot open 2: $!\n";
    ($title, $dup) = isDuplicate($tempFile, $title);
    if($dup == 1) { close $tempFile; next; }
    close $tempFile;
    say ++$i . "th report!!!";

    # Copy one XML file to HDD.
    if($eachAddr =~ /.*\/(.*)/)
    {
        say $valid $1;
        open $copyFile, '>', $copyFilePath . $1 or die "Cannot open 3: $!\n";
        print $copyFile get($eachAddr);
        close $copyFile;
    }

    # If the entry is NOT fixed or resolved, go on to the next entry
    open $tempFile, '<', $tempFilePath or die "Cannot open 4: $!\n";
    if(isFixCloseResolve($tempFile) == 0) { close $tempFile; next; }
    close $tempFile;

    # Analyze one entry
    open $tempFile, '<',  $tempFilePath or die "Cannot open 5: $!\n";
    open $analyzed, '>>', $analyzedPath or die "Cannot open 6: $!\n";
    analyzeOneReport($tempFile, $analyzed);
    close $tempFile;
    close $analyzed;
    say '                      ' . ++$j . "th fixed & closed report!!!";
}
say "$i total reports.";
say "$j total fixed & closed reports.";
close $input;
close $valid;
say "Finished!";

sub isDuplicate
{
    my $iReport = $_[0];
    my $title = 'temp';
    my $dup = 0;

    while(<$iReport>)
    {
        if ($_ =~ /.*\<title>(.*)\<\/title>/)
        {
            if($1 ne 'ASF JIRA') { $title = $1; if($title eq $_[1]) { $dup = 1; } last; }
        }
    }
    return ($title, $dup);
}

# returns 1 if an entry is a Bug and Fixed and Closed
sub isFixCloseResolve
{
    my $iReport = $_[0];
    my $isCloseResolve = 0;
    my $isFixed = 0;
    while(<$iReport>)
    {
        if   ($_ =~ /.*\<status[^>]*>(.*)\<\/status>/) { if(($1 eq 'Closed')||($1 eq 'Resolved')) { $isCloseResolve = 1;} }
        elsif($_ =~ /.*\<resolution[^>]*>(.*)\<\/resolution>/) { if($1 eq 'Fixed') { $isFixed = 1;} }
    }
    return $isCloseResolve * $isFixed;
}

sub analyzeOneReport
{
    my $iReport = $_[0];
    my $oReport = $_[1];

    while(<$iReport>)
    {
        chomp;
        if   ($_ =~ /.*\<title>(.*)\<\/title>/) { if($1 ne 'ASF JIRA') { say $oReport "Title   : $1"; } }
        elsif($_ =~ /.*\<assignee username="(.*)">.*\<\/assignee>/) { say $oReport "Assignee: $1"; }
        elsif($_ =~ /.*\<reporter username="(.*)">.*\<\/reporter>/) { say $oReport "Reporter: $1"; }
        elsif($_ =~ /.*\<type[^>]*>(.*)\<\/type>/)         { say $oReport "Type    : $1"; }
        elsif($_ =~ /.*\<priority[^>]*>(.*)\<\/priority>/) { say $oReport "Priority: $1"; }
        elsif($_ =~ /.*\<created>(.*)\<\/created>/)        { say $oReport "Created : $1"; }
        elsif($_ =~ /.*\<resolved>(.*)\<\/resolved>/)      { say $oReport "Resolved: $1"; }
    }
    say $oReport '--------------------------------------------';
}

--- Postscript ---

Oh, I was wrong on '>' part!! Thank you everyone!!

But when I changed that into '>', still nothing was written on the file 'DURING PROGRAM RUNNING TIME'.

So I was confused...and I found that Perl actually writes the contents to the file 'WHEN IT CLOSED THE FILE'.

So during running time, for 4~8 hours, I could not see anything in the file.

Data is written on the file when the file is closed.

That's one of the reason why I thought this code was not working. ^^;

Hope nobody else suffer from this problem again! :)

share|improve this question
    
$copyfile->autoflush(1) –  Brad Gilbert Jan 3 '12 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

Here:

open my $valid, '<',....

you have opened $valid for reading. If you wish to write to the file, you must instead write:

open my $valid, '>',....

If you need to keep existing contents and write only to the end then instead use

open my $valid, '>>',....
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I was wrong on that part!! Thank you!! But when I changed that into '>', still nothing was written on the file 'DURING PROGRAM RUNNING TIME'. So I was confused...and I found that Perl writes the contents to the file 'WHEN IT CLOSED THE FILE'. So during running time, for 4~8 hours, I could not see anything in the file. That's one of the reason why I thought this code was not working. ^^; –  S.J. Jan 3 '12 at 13:28
1  
That's buffering for you. Perl keeps data in a buffer until it's full, then flushes it to the file when the buffer is full, or the file is closed. You can make the buffer flush immediately to the file by using the line: $| = 1; before opening your file. –  Rohaq Jan 4 '12 at 17:55
    
@Rohaq Thank you so much!! I learned a new thing! ^^ –  S.J. Jan 4 '12 at 18:17

You're only opening the file under the $valid file handle with read capabilities, as you can see from this line:

open my $valid, '<', 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\valid.txt' or die "Cannot read: $!\n";

So nothing you write to the file will actually go into it. Change it to read/write (or append, if you need it, just use +>> instead of +> in the code below), and you should be good, as follows:

open my $valid, '+>', 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\valid.txt' or die "Cannot read: $!\n";
share|improve this answer
    
It's looking like read access is unnecessary; i'm not seeing where the script reads the file at all. Plain old write (>) or append (>>) should do. –  cHao Jan 2 '12 at 5:36
    
Ah, I assumed he might have been using the read access for a reason. Yep, write/append access is probably best then. –  Rohaq Jan 2 '12 at 5:39
    
Oh, I was wrong on that part!! Thank you!! But when I changed that into '>', still nothing was written on the file 'DURING PROGRAM RUNNING TIME'. So I was confused...and I found that Perl writes the contents to the file 'WHEN IT CLOSED THE FILE'. So during running time, for 4~8 hours, I could not see anything in the file. That's one of the reason why I thought this code was not working. ^^; –  S.J. Jan 3 '12 at 13:30
    
Since you posted the same comment under my solution :): That's buffering for you. Perl keeps data in a buffer until it's full, then flushes it to the file when the buffer is full, or the file is closed. You can make the buffer flush immediately to the file by using the line: $| = 1; before opening your file. –  Rohaq Jan 4 '12 at 17:57

I am going to review this code as if it had been posted to Code Review.

First off you are writing in Perl as if it were C. Which in general is not that bad, but it does mean that you are doing quite a bit more work than is necessary.


Instead of using this overly verbose, and potentially memory intensive:

my @totalReport
...
while(<$input>) { chomp; push @totalReport, $_; }
foreach(@totalReport)
{
  $eachAddr = $_;
  ...
}
while( my $addr = <$input> ){
  chomp $addr;
  ...
}

Notice how I've eliminated a variable, and made it so that it loops on the input once, instead of twice. It also doesn't keep the values in memory over the entire length of the program.


Instead of opening a file for writing, closing it, and opening it again:

my $tempFile;

open $tempFile, '>', $tempFilePath or die "Cannot open 1: $!\n";
print $tempFile get($eachAddr);
close $tempFile;

open $tempFile, '<', $tempFilePath or die "Cannot open 2: $!\n";
open my $tempFile, '+>', $tempFilePath or die "Can't open '$tempFilePath' with mode'+>': '$!'";
print $tempFile get($eachAddr);
seek $tempFile, 0, 0;

Instead of getting the text at the given URL twice, and using a weird defined test:

$undefCheck = get($eachAddr);
if(defined($undefCheck) == 0) { next; }
...
print $tempFile get($eachAddr);
my $text = get( $addr );
next unless defined $text;
...
print $tempFile $text;

Instead of a bunch of:

open ... or die ...;

I would use autodie.

use autodie;
...
# will now die on error and will tell you the file it fails on.
open my $fh, '<', $filename;

Another thing I would like to point out is that die "...\n" prevents die from appending the location of the error. The only time you should do that is if the default behaviour is unhelpful.


If you closed $tempFile before checking $dup this could be simpler:

if($dup == 1) { close $tempFile; next; }
close $tempFile;
close $tempFile;
next if $dup;

Instead of this repetitive block of code:

while(<$iReport>)
{
    chomp;
    if   ($_ =~ /.*\<title>(.*)\<\/title>/) { if($1 ne 'ASF JIRA') { say $oReport "Title   : $1"; } }
    elsif($_ =~ /.*\<assignee username="(.*)">.*\<\/assignee>/) { say $oReport "Assignee: $1"; }
    elsif($_ =~ /.*\<reporter username="(.*)">.*\<\/reporter>/) { say $oReport "Reporter: $1"; }
    elsif($_ =~ /.*\<type[^>]*>(.*)\<\/type>/)         { say $oReport "Type    : $1"; }
    elsif($_ =~ /.*\<priority[^>]*>(.*)\<\/priority>/) { say $oReport "Priority: $1"; }
    elsif($_ =~ /.*\<created>(.*)\<\/created>/)        { say $oReport "Created : $1"; }
    elsif($_ =~ /.*\<resolved>(.*)\<\/resolved>/)      { say $oReport "Resolved: $1"; }
}
use List::Util qw'max';
my @simple_tags = qw'title type priority created resolved';
my $simple_tags_length = max map length, @simple_tags, qw'assignee reporter';
my $simple_tags = join '|', @simple_tags;
...
while( <$iReport> ){
  my($tag,$contents);
  if( ($tag,$contents) = /<($simple_tags)[^>]*>(.*?)<\/\g{1}>/ ){
  }elsif( ($tag,$contents) = /<(assignee|reporter) username="(.*?)">.*?<\/\g{1}>/ ){
  }else{ next }
  printf $oReport "%-${simple_tags_length}s: %s\n", ucfirst($tag), $contents;
}

While this code isn't any shorter, or clearer, it would be very easy to add another tag to compare against. So it isn't really better, as less repetitive.
I would like to point out that $_ =~ /.../ is better written as /.../.


Perhaps the worst part of the code is that you define almost all of you variables up-front.

my @totalReport;
my $eachAddr;
my $copyFile;
my $copyFilePath = 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\HADOOP XML\\';
my $tempFile;
my $tempFilePath = 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\temp.txt';
my $analyzed;
my $analyzedPath = 'c:\perl\015_JiraGet\analyzed - HADOOP.txt';
my $undefCheck;
my $i = 0;
my $j = 0;
my $title = 'temp';
my $dup = 0;

This means that you are practically using global variables. While some of these appear to need to be defined there, some of them don't, and therefore shouldn't be defined there. You should really be defining your variables at the point you need them, or at least at the beginning of the block where you need them.

share|improve this answer
    
Sincerely thank you very much for your kind comments. As you might guessed already, I've been using C for several years and started using Perl just 4 month ago. Your comments will help me a lot. Thank you so much and Happy New Year!!! ^^ –  S.J. Jan 3 '12 at 13:27
    
@user1125721 I was worried that I might have come off overly critical. I'm glad that at least you don't think so. –  Brad Gilbert Jan 3 '12 at 16:39

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