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I am trying to loop from 100 to 0. How do I do this in Python?

for i in range (100,0) doesn't work.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Try range(100,-1,-1), the 3rd argument being the increment to use (documented here).

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1  
you could also use xrange instead of range if you don't need the number list, but this is the correct answer. –  cyborg_ar May 15 '09 at 17:24
2  
Also I need to use this to delete items from the collection, so that's why just wanted the indices. –  Joan Venge May 15 '09 at 17:33
1  
whats the second argument? –  deltanine Jul 13 '12 at 1:34
    
the second argument is one less than the final value. so if you put -1 then the range stops at 0, if you put -5, the range stops at -4 (for an increment of -1) –  mulllhausen Jul 20 at 14:01

In my opinion, this is the most readable:

for i in reversed(xrange(101)):
    print i,
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5  
This is better than the accepted answer since it doesn't actually allocate all the numbers in memory (in Python 3 the accepted answer wouldn't either), plus it's more obvious what is happening. –  Blixt Mar 23 '12 at 13:52
2  
Python before 2.6 does allocate all numbers, because reversed has no way to tell the xrange to go backwards... (Since Python 2.6 it calls __reversed__().) –  Robert Siemer Jun 21 '12 at 18:31
    
@Triptych thanks prefer this solution –  zulucoda Oct 2 '12 at 8:51
    
I prefer reversed(xrange(len(list))) to xrange(len(list)-1:-1:-1); the latter just looks weird with so many -1's. –  musiphil Sep 7 '13 at 1:13
for i in range(100, -1, -1)

and some slightly longer (and slower) solution:

for i in reversed(range(101))

for i in range(101)[::-1]
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Generally in Python, you can use negative indices to start from the back:

numbers = [10, 20, 30, 40, 50]
for i in xrange(len(numbers)):
    print numbers[-i - 1]

Result:

50
40
30
20
10
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Another solution:

z = 10
for x in range (z):
   y = z-x
   print y

Result:

10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

Tip: If you are using this method to count back indices in a list, you will want to -1 from the 'y' value, as your list indices will begin at 0.

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for var in range(10,-1,-1) works

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I tried this in one of the codeacademy exercises (reversing chars in a string without using reversed nor :: -1)

def reverse(text):
    chars= []
    l = len(text)
    last = l-1
    for i in range (l):
        chars.append(text[last])
        last-=1

    result= ""   
    for c in chars:
        result += c
    return result
print reverse('hola')
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