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I want to get some specific parts of an image so I'm cropping the images. However, when I want to get a part that is not parallel to the image, I rotate the image and crop afterwards.

I don't want to rotate the image and crop a parallel rectangle. What I want is, without rotating the image, to crop a rectangle with an angle from the image.

Is there any way to do that?

I think I couldnt express myself well enough. This is what I want to do: example picture.

Assume the red thing is a rectangle :) I want to crop that thing out of image. After cropping it doesn't need to be angeled. So mj can lie down.

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is that in web-application? –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Jan 2 '12 at 9:17
    
does this require a full 360 degrees rotation? or 90? –  AlanFoster Jan 2 '12 at 9:26
    
it is not in a web-application. the degree changes actually, may be 32,90 whatever. –  user1125953 Jan 2 '12 at 9:30
    
How are you currently defining the part you want to crop? A Rectangle and an angle? does the image rotate around it's center or around the center of the crop Rectangle? –  Rotem Jan 2 '12 at 10:20
    
@rotem. i dont want to rotate the image. the image will stay as it is. but the rectangle i crop will be angled according to image. –  user1125953 Jan 2 '12 at 10:56
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This method should perform what you asked for.

public static Bitmap CropRotatedRect(Bitmap source, Rectangle rect, float angle, bool HighQuality)
{
    Bitmap result = new Bitmap(rect.Width, rect.Height);
    using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(result))
    {
        g.InterpolationMode = HighQuality ? InterpolationMode.HighQualityBicubic : InterpolationMode.Default;
        using (Matrix mat = new Matrix())
        {
            mat.Translate(-rect.Location.X, -rect.Location.Y);
            mat.RotateAt(angle, rect.Location);
            g.Transform = mat;
            g.DrawImage(source, new Point(0, 0));
        }
    }
    return result;
}

usage (using your MJ example):

Bitmap src = new Bitmap("C:\\mjexample.jpg");
Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(272, 5, 100, 350);
Bitmap cropped = cropRotatedRect(src, rect, -42.5f, true);
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Thank you so much. This works perfect. Just wondered that does this affect image quality at all? –  user1125953 Jan 2 '12 at 12:37
    
It affects image quality just as any rotation (other than 90 degrees) inevitably affects the quality. If the answer is what you need please accept it as the answer. –  Rotem Jan 2 '12 at 12:48
    
Sorry but i have to ask one more thing now :(. What can i do if the rectengle exceeds image dimension? Actually in that case i want to take the exceeding part from the back of the starting point. if i explaint it visually again :) it should be like : imageshack.us/photo/my-images/215/smoothcriminalleanexcee.jpg Actually it is still a rectangle as you see. Nothing has changed about the rectangle's size or starting point.. –  user1125953 Jan 6 '12 at 12:27
    
I thought I understood what you want but your example confused me. Where is the starting point and what is that shape? –  Rotem Jan 6 '12 at 15:14
    
Yeah you understood right but i forgot to tell this before.Actually nothing has changed. If you look carefully, when you merge these 2 parts from that weird puzzle like part, it is still a rectangle. What i want is still croping a rectangle. but when the image dimensions are exceeded i dont want to get a blank background color. I want to contuniue to crop. cropping from where? cropping from behind of starting edge as many as rectangle size needs. so it will finish where it is started. i hope i am clear enough –  user1125953 Jan 6 '12 at 16:10
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