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Getting more and more familiar with DI but I still have few niggles.

Read few articles where it says "Injection must be done at the entry point"

Suppose I have a situation where we have wcf Services and these are used both by internal win/web application and external third parties uses those wcf services.

Now where do you inject the Services and repositories? Above to me seems to be a common scenarios!

Also i pass all those interfaces around.(Very good for mocking) how do I stop somebody from calling EG my repository from a layer that should NOT be calling the repository.

EG only the business Layer should call DAL. Now by injecting a IRepository into a controller nothing stops a developer from calling the DAL.

Any suggestion? Links that clear all this

Noddy example of my poor man DI. How do I do the same using unity and Injecting all at the entryPoint?

[TestFixture]
public class Class1
{
    [Test]
    public void GetAll_when_called_is_invoked()
    {
        var mockRepository = new Mock<ICustomerRepository>();
        mockRepository.Setup(x => x.GetAll()).Verifiable();

        new CustomerService(mockRepository.Object);
        ICustomerBiz customerBiz = new CustomerBizImp(mockRepository.Object);

        customerBiz.GetAll();
        mockRepository.Verify(x=>x.GetAll(),Times.AtLeastOnce());
    }
}
public class CustomerService : ICustomerService  //For brevity (in real will be a wcf service)
{
    private readonly ICustomerRepository _customerRepository;

    public CustomerService(ICustomerRepository customerRepository)
    {
        _customerRepository = customerRepository;
    }

    public IEnumerable<Customer> GetAll()
    {
        return _customerRepository.GetAll();
    }
}

public class CustomerBizImp : ICustomerBiz
{
    private readonly ICustomerRepository _customerRepository;

    public CustomerBizImp(ICustomerRepository customerRepository)
    {
        _customerRepository = customerRepository;
    }

    public IEnumerable<Customer> GetAll()
    {
        return _customerRepository.GetAll();
    }
}

public class CustomerRepository : ICustomerRepository
{
    public IEnumerable<Customer> GetAll()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
public interface ICustomerRepository
{
    IEnumerable<Customer> GetAll();
}

public interface ICustomerService
{
    IEnumerable<Customer> GetAll();
}

public interface ICustomerBiz
{
    IEnumerable<Customer> GetAll();
}

public class Customer
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

thanks

share|improve this question
    
We used to do only a DEBUG based build DIs in our code. In other words production never used to have a DI based codes at all. –  zenwalker Jan 2 '12 at 10:33
1  
@zenwalker then you've wasted your time using DI, one of the best reasons to use it is so that you can inject deifferent modules for developing, testing and release, each module tested on its own. –  Lloyd Jan 2 '12 at 10:49
    
Yep thats what i meant. We did DI only for testing purpose i.e DEBUG mode. We did not sent them as part of our production code i.e RELEASE mode to customer. Sorry if it was not clear earlier. –  zenwalker Jan 2 '12 at 12:56
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a blog post on Composition roots or what you call entry points. Its from Mark Seemann the author of Dependency Injection in .NET. If you are looking for a deep understanding of DI this book is a must read.

There are a lot of samples out there on how to combine WCF and DI. If you are hosting your services in IIS you would need to write a custom ServiceHostFactory where you initialize you DI container. This is a sample for Microsoft's Unity.

As to

how do I stop somebody from calling EG my repository from a layer that should NOT be calling the repository

Do you use poor man's DI and pass all your references around through all your layers? Then you should definitely consider using a DI/IoC container like StructureMap, Castle Windsor, AutoFac or Unity.

If you are asking "how can I in general avoid the situation that someone does not follow my layer boundaries": Write tests that fail if an assembly references another one it should not reference (e.g. UI should not reference DAL).


UPDATE

I assume you wanted the service to use ICustomerBiz instead of the ICustomerRepository. If that is right the setup for Unity would look like this:

[TestMethod]
public void GetAll_with_Unity()
{
  var container = new UnityContainer();
  container.RegisterType<ICustomerRepository, CustomerRepository>();
  container.RegisterType<ICustomerBiz, CustomerBizImp>();
  container.RegisterType<ICustomerService, CustomerService>();
  var svc = container.Resolve<ICustomerService>();
  var all = svc.GetAll();
  Assert.AreEqual(1, all.Count());
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Weber thanks for your reply and links. I had already read Mark Seeman posts + I m now looking into writing a ServiceHostFactory.Poor Man's DI.Yes I am doing this. Is there an example of using Unity that shows how to avoid passing refs around? I am doing UI --> (channelFactory)ServiceLayer(wcf) ---> BizLayer-->Dal. Only Biz Layer should call DAL.Injecting into constructor(passing around) IService and IRepository between layers –  user231465 Jan 2 '12 at 11:16
    
The TecX project contains a sample on how to inject a service using Unity. Your view-model class would need a constructor that takes an IMyService parameter. Then you tell Unity that IMyService should be mapped using the ChannelFactory. And on the service side your service implementation takes an IMyBiz parameter and the business logic implementation takes an IDal. You need to tell Unity that IMyBiz maps to MyBizImpl and IDal to NHibernateDal and you are done. –  Sebastian Weber Jan 2 '12 at 11:27
    
@Weber thanks for the link.Digesting the link.What you describe is exactly what I want to do. Is there or come across a noddy example the goes from the beginning to end using unity and Interested in looking how the various project ref each other etc... –  user231465 Jan 2 '12 at 15:22
    
@Weber added noddy example of implementation. –  user231465 Jan 2 '12 at 15:36
    
@Weber Thank you very much.That helped a lot –  user231465 Jan 2 '12 at 20:16
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DI is much more about injecting a dependency inside your dipendency architecture, that's why it can not resolve, as is, layers isolation problem you face.

Production code can and should contain DI code, if it needed.

  • If we are talking about plugin-based architectureDI is one of most natural choices out there.

  • if we are talking about app behaviour change, like for example Logging system choice: save on remote server if connection present if not injject local logger for future sync with the server.

There are plenty of usages of DI in production, but all that is up to Architect to decide when, how and if use it.

In other words, there is no single rule of it use, it's not a hummer for any nail, so use it where you think it's approriate and use it wisely.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply.How do I prevent a repository to be called from a layer is not intended to when Dependency injection is used.Any examples anywhere? –  user231465 Jan 2 '12 at 11:00
    
@user231465: repository in domain model is a super class that has to be responsable for managing object in your dependency model and shouldn't present referencies inside injecting laters. Who is gonna cal your repository? –  Tigran Jan 2 '12 at 11:08
    
at what stage do you inject your "IRepositories". –  user231465 Jan 2 '12 at 11:18
    
I'm afraid I don't really understand your problem. The repository implements an interface. If consumer object csn not host that interface, there is no way it can get a reference to a repositiry it doesn't support. Isn't it? –  Tigran Jan 2 '12 at 11:30
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