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if you have a class with a static import to java.lang.Integer and my class also has a static method parseInt(String) then which method will the call parseInt("12345") point to?

Thanks in Advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you're inside your own class it will call your method.
If you're outside your class (and import both classes) you must specify which class to use.

Prove: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/download/langspec-3.0.pdf $8 and $6.3 (see comments)

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can you show a reference indicating it is guaranteed by the standard to be the case? It might be compiler depended... –  amit Jan 2 '12 at 12:06
    
waiting for sm1 to reply to amit –  MozenRath Jan 2 '12 at 12:14
2  
From Java Language Specification $8: The scope (§6.3) of a member (§8.2) is the entire body of the declaration of the class to which the member belongs. | From $6.3: The scope of a declaration is the region of the program within which the entity declared by the declaration can be referred to using a simple name (provided it isvvisible (§6.3.1)). –  Paranaix Jan 2 '12 at 12:22
    
@Paranaix: Please add link to the specs and add it to your answer, and you get my +1. It is a full proven answer, in my opinion. –  amit Jan 2 '12 at 12:26
2  
I think it still misses one point (from jls): §6.3.1 A declaration d of a method named n shadows the declarations of any other methods named n that are in an enclosing scope at the point where d occurs throughout the scope of d. –  soulcheck Jan 2 '12 at 12:32

Try this:

import static java.lang.Integer.parseInt;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(parseInt("12345"));
    }

    private static int parseInt(String str) {
        System.out.println("str");
        return 123;
    }
}

the result:

str
123

the method in you class is executed first.

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2  
can you show a reference indicating it is guaranteed by the standard to be the case? It might be compiler depended... –  amit Jan 2 '12 at 12:05
1  
+1 I like the proof. –  Bohemian Jan 2 '12 at 12:08

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