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When I optimize my 2 single queries to run in less than 0.02 seconds and then UNION them the resulting query takes over 1 second to run. Also, a UNION ALL takes longer than a UNION DISTINCT. I would assume allowing duplicates would make the query run faster and not slower. Am I really just better off running the 2 queries separately? I would prefer to use the UNION.

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could you post the script? –  Eric May 15 '09 at 18:07
    
Unfortunately I cannot (work), it is a pretty straight forward query though I think. Perhaps I need some insight on how UNIONS are performed by MySQL. I notice on an explain for the joined query I am using filesort and temp table whereas each individual query is not. –  Greg May 15 '09 at 18:13
    
Not the whole script, just the relevant query. –  ceejayoz May 15 '09 at 18:16
    
As a simple example if I do SELECT name FROM t1 WHERE field1 = true it takes .001 and if I do SELECT name FROM t1 WHERE field1 = false it takes .1 seconds. If I then run SELECT name FROM t1 WHERE field1 = true UNION ALL SELECT name FROM t1 WHERE field1 = false it takes over 1 second. It is not the result of a specific query. –  Greg May 15 '09 at 18:20

3 Answers 3

When I optimize my 2 single queries to run in less than 0.02 seconds and then UNION them the resulting query takes over 1 second to run.

Do your queries include ORDER BY … LIMIT clauses?

If you put an ORDER BY … LIMIT after a UNION, it gets applied to the whole UNION, and indexes cannot be used in this case.

If id is a primary key, this query will be instant:

SELECT  *
FROM    table
ORDER BY id
LIMIT 1

, but this one will not:

SELECT  *
FROM    table
UNION ALL
SELECT  *
FROM    table
ORDER BY id
LIMIT 1

Also, a UNION ALL takes longer than a UNION DISTINCT. I would assume allowing duplicates would make the query run faster and not slower.

This also seems to be due to ORDER BY. Sorting a smaller set is faster than a larger one.

Am I really just better off running the 2 queries separately? I would prefer to use the UNION

Do you need the resulting set to be sorted?

If not, just get rid of the final ORDER BY.

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what if i need the order by removing it. makes my query 2.5secs, with it can go up to 45secs. –  bonez Jun 11 '13 at 10:14
    
@sharif: what kind of an answer do you expect? –  Quassnoi Jun 11 '13 at 13:28

A guess: Since you query one table with 2 unions, it might be,that mysql has difficulties to decide on a locking strategy for the table, or it tries some caching, that doesn't work here since you query for disjoint sets, tries to multithread the access (very reasonable) but runs into some locking/concurrency/file-seeking issues..

unions might also generally employ a higher safety setting, since these two selects have to be consistent. If you put them into separate transactions, they do not.

Experiment: Make a duplicate of the table and union those. If I'm right, it should be faster.

Possible solution: Split the single file into multiple files, to allow for better concurrency strategies. This wouldn't/shouldn't help with locking issues, but rules out the multithreading/seeking problems in the database.

It would be useful to know, which storage engine you use.

Well just my 2 cents. Can't test this here right now.

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im using Innodb, and MyIsam –  bonez Jun 12 '13 at 10:14

Could it be that you measure response time and not time to retrieve all data?

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duration in mysql workbench –  bonez Jun 12 '13 at 10:14

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