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I would like to overload the operator<< to allow it to work with shared_ptr.

template<typename T>
struct foo
{
    virtual foo& operator<<(const T& e) = 0;
};

foo<int> f1;
f1 << 1;

std::shared_ptr<foo<int>> f2(new foo<int>());
f2 << 1;

My first try is the following, but the problem is that it with also enable the behavior for any class.

template<typename T, typename U>
const std::shared_ptr<T>& operator<<(const std::shared_ptr<T>& o, const U& e)
{
    *o << e;
    return o;
}

My second try is the following:

template<typename T, typename U>
const std::shared_ptr<foo<T>>& operator<<(const std::shared_ptr<foo<T>>& o, const U& e)
{
    *o << e;
    return o;
}

The problem with this solution is not work for types inheriting foo since T cannot be automatically deduced.

So I could skip U and use T instead, in which case T will be deduced from the second argument and the argument for o can be converted into foo<T>.

template<typename T, typename U>
const std::shared_ptr<foo<T>>& operator<<(const std::shared_ptr<foo<T>>& o, const T& e)
{
    *o << e;
    return o;
}

But then the following will not work:

struct c    
{    
};

struct a
{
    a();
    a(c); // implicit conversion
};

struct b
{
    operator a(); // implicit conversion
};

auto f = std::make_shared<foo<a>>();
f << c; // doesn't work.
f << b; // doesn't work.

Any ideas on how make a working solution?

share|improve this question
4  
What do you want this overload to do? I'm not sure it's a good idea... –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 2 '12 at 12:58
    
Instead of writing *f << b, I want to be able to write f << b, independent of whether f is a value type or smart pointer. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 12:59
3  
That's the bit that doesn't sound like a good idea... –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 2 '12 at 13:15
    
@OliCharlesworth: Care to expand on why? –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 13:20
3  
@ronag: It obscures what happens. You smear the distinction between a pointer and its pointee. These are two different objects, and a * is a small price to pay to keep the distinction. –  thiton Jan 2 '12 at 13:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some options, see the second live at https://ideone.com/26nqr

Given

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
using namespace std;

template<typename T> struct foo {
    virtual foo& operator<<(const T& e) const { std::cout << "check foo\n"; }
};

//////
// derived instances

struct derived : foo<int> {
    virtual derived& operator<<(const int& e) const { std::cout << "check derived\n"; }
};

template<typename T> struct genericDerived : foo<T> {
    virtual derived& operator<<(const T& e) const { std::cout << "check genericDerived\n"; }
};

Simple: template template arguments

template<typename T, typename U, template <typename> class X>
const std::shared_ptr<X<T>>& operator<<(const std::shared_ptr<X<T>>& o, const U& e)
{
    *o << e;
    return o;
}

int main()
{
    auto f = make_shared<foo<int>>();
    f << 1;

    auto d = make_shared<derived>();
    d << 2; // compile error

    auto g = make_shared<genericDerived<int>>();
    g << 3; // SUCCESS!
}

Completer: SFINAE

The above doesn't catch derived classes (case 2). To do that, I'd resort to

#include <type_traits>
namespace detail
{
    template<typename Foo, typename T>
        const std::shared_ptr<Foo>& dispatch_lshift(
                  const std::shared_ptr<Foo>& o, const T& e, 
                  const std::true_type& enabler)
        {
            *o << e;
            return o;
        }
}

template<typename Foo, typename T>
    const std::shared_ptr<Foo>& operator<<(const std::shared_ptr<Foo>& o, const T& e)
{
    return detail::dispatch_lshift(o, e, std::is_convertible<Foo*, foo<T>* >());
}

int main()
{
    auto f = make_shared<foo<int>>();
    f << 1;

    auto d = make_shared<derived>();
    d << 2;

    auto g = make_shared<genericDerived<int>>();
    g << 3;

    auto x = make_shared<int>();
    // x << 4; // correctly FAILS to compile    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer! Just need to figure out why it works. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 13:34
    
see it live at ideone.com/26nqr –  sehe Jan 2 '12 at 13:35
    
It works because of (1) template template arguments, (2) SFINAE for the more complicated case –  sehe Jan 2 '12 at 13:35
    
Yea, the template template argument bit is a bit tricky. Need to find my Moden C++ Design book again. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 13:43
    
Somehow nobody noticed my earlier SFINAE version was broken (accepted any shared_ptr<>, because a pointer to an incomplete type is not a problem). I have posted a better approach now... –  sehe Jan 2 '12 at 16:23

May be you're putting yourself in a bad arena, of making C++ to look like Java.

C++ pointers, values, and references are different types, and have different semantics and operations. It is not in general a good idea to mix them up into a same syntax. Pointers are not their values: they can point to types other than the one they refer (typical, in case of inheritance). So it is in general better to let pointer dereference to remain explicit.

Neverless, saving to a stream a "pointer value" (not "pointe*d* value") has no interest, since that value (a memory address) will be meaningless on stream reading.

If you properly want to "save what is pointed", when saving a pointer you should save something tells "what type of object you're saving", an then save the object polymorphically, (through a call to a virtual function) o that also the derived data are saved. Meanwhile, you also have to track circular references, in order not to save a same object multiple times (and loading it back as distinct objects), so an "identity" is also required.

To load the object back, you should first read the metadata you saved to describe the type, and based on that, create a corresponding object, then reassign its members to the data loaded on extraction. (Or if just an identity was saved, point the pointer to the already recreated corresponding object).

All that stuffs goes under the name of serialization. There are many solution around, you should probably Google for that key.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to save what is "pointed", I want to "send" #to# what is "pointed". This question does not have anything to do with serializations. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 13:33
    
@ronag It has: if you want to "send", someone has to "receive". And to "receive" you must be able to reconstruct. And you cannot reconstruct if some information are missing. Saving is just a particular case where "sending" and "receiving" happen in different time. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jan 2 '12 at 13:40
    
There is no serialization going on here, just simple method invocation. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 13:41
    
@ronad: I don't insist. But you will be back here in a couple of weeks! –  Emilio Garavaglia Jan 2 '12 at 13:45
    
Likewise. In the meantime I suggest you take a look at sehe's answer. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 17:49

You could use your first solution with enable_if (I'm using C++03 namespaces):

template <typename T>
class is_funky : public boost::false_type {};

template <typename S>
class is_funky< Foo<S> > : public boost::true_type {};

template<typename T, typename U>
typename boost::enable_if< is_funky<T>, const boost::shared_ptr<T>& >::type 
operator<<(const boost::shared_ptr<T>& o, const U& e)
{
    *o << e;
    return o;
}

You might want to find a more appropriate name than is_funky in production code, but that depends on context.

share|improve this answer
    
That will not work for types inheriting foo. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 13:21

I see that there is an accepted solution but I think the proper solution is, indeed, to use std::enable_if, although not the way it was mentioned before: the type trait needs to detect that that foo<T> is a base of the smart pointer's element type. A simple approach to do this is to define a custom trait for this and use this in the definition of the shift operator:

namespace detail
{
    template <typename T> char (&is_foo_base_of_helper(foo<T> const*))[1];
    char (&is_foo_base_of_helper(void*, ...))[2];
}


template <typename T>
struct is_foo_base_of
{
    enum { value = 1 == sizeof(detail::is_foo_base_of_helper(static_cast<T const*>(0))) };
};

template <typename P, typename U>
typename std::enable_if<is_foo_base_of<typename P::element_type>::value, P>::type
operator<< (P const& ptr, U const& other)
{
    *ptr << other;
    return ptr;
}

(In an earlier version of the answer I missed that foo is a template)

This would allow all smart pointers which define a nested element_type to use this shift operator for classes derived from foo<T>. This can tightened to use only specific smart pointer, e.g. std::shared_ptr<T> by mentioning the actual smart point class template in the declaration of the pointer type. On the other hand, to extend it to other smart pointers and/or to plain pointers the pointee type would need to be obtained differently (instead of assuming there is a nested element_type).

share|improve this answer
    
It will not work since foo is a templated type. –  ronag Jan 2 '12 at 14:17

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