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I'm trying to implement an collision attack on hashes (I'm visiting the course 'cryptography'). Therefore I have two arrays of hashes (= byte-sequences byte[]) and want to find hashes which are present in both arrays. After some research and a lot of thinking I am sure that the best solution on a single-core machine would be a HashSet (add all elements of the first array and check via contains if elements of the second array are already present).

However, I want to implement a concurrent solution, since I have access to a machine with 8 cores and 12 GB RAM. The best solution I can think of is ConcurrentHashSet, which could be created via Collections.newSetFromMap(new ConcurrentHashMap<A,B>()). Using this data structure I could add all elements of the first array in parallel and - after all elements where added - I can concurrently check via contains for identical hashes.

So my question is: Do you know an algorithm designed for this exact problem? If not, do you have experience using such a ConcurrentHashSet concerning problems and effective runtime complexity? Or can you recommend another prebuilt data structure which could help me?

PS: If anyone is interested in the details: I plan to use Skandium to parallelize my program.

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Are the arrays already sorted? If so, a one-pass-through merge like function will find duplicates. Otherwise you could sort array1 and array2 in parallel and do the merge on the results. –  Ingo Jan 2 '12 at 13:03
1  
By byte hashes do you mean that all hashes are in the interval 0-255? –  Tudor Jan 2 '12 at 13:07
    
I meant byte-sequences, i.e. byte[]. They are the result of a hash-function like SHA or MD5. No, the arrays aren't sorted. Sorting and merging them would need O(n log n) for sorting and O(n + m) for merging. I hoped for a higher efficiency. –  Florian Pilz Jan 2 '12 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think it would be a complete waste of time to use any form of HashMap. I am guessing you are calculating multi-byte hashes of various data, these are already hashes, there is no need to perform any more hashing on them.

Although you do not state it, I am guessing your hashes are byte sequences. Clearly either a trie or a dawg would be ideal to store these.

I would suggest therefore you implement a trie/dawg and use it to store all of the hashes in the first array. You could then use all of your computing power in parallel to lookup each element in your second array in this trie. No locks would be required.

Added

Here's a simple Dawg implementation I knocked together. It seems to work.

public class Dawg {
  // All my children.
  Dawg[] children = new Dawg[256];
  // Am I a leaf.
  boolean isLeaf = false;

  // Add a new word.
  public void add ( byte[] word ) {
    // Finds its location, growing as necessary.
    Dawg loc = find ( word, 0, true );
    loc.isLeaf = true;
  }

  // String form.
  public void add ( String word ) {
    add(word.getBytes());
  }

  // Returns true if word is in the dawg.
  public boolean contains ( byte [] word ) {
    // Finds its location, no growing allowed.
    Dawg d = find ( word, 0, false );
    return d != null && d.isLeaf; 
  }

  // String form.
  public boolean contains ( String word ) {
    return contains(word.getBytes());
  }

  // Find the Dawg - growing the tree as necessary if requested.
  private Dawg find ( byte [] word, int i, boolean grow ) {
    Dawg child = children[word[i]];
    if ( child == null ) {
      // Not present!
      if ( grow ) {
        // Grow the tree.
        child = new Dawg();
        children[word[i]] = child;
      }
    }
    // Found it?
    if ( child != null ) {
      // More to find?
      if ( i < word.length - 1 ) {
        child = child.find(word, i+1, grow);
      }
    }
    return child;
  }

  public static void main ( String[] args ) {
    Dawg d = new Dawg();
    d.add("H");
    d.add("Hello");
    d.add("World");
    d.add("Hell");
    System.out.println("Hello is "+(d.contains("Hello")?"in":"out"));
    System.out.println("World is "+(d.contains("World")?"in":"out"));
    System.out.println("Hell is "+(d.contains("Hell")?"in":"out"));
    System.out.println("Hal is "+(d.contains("Hal")?"in":"out"));
    System.out.println("Hel is "+(d.contains("Hel")?"in":"out"));
    System.out.println("H is "+(d.contains("H")?"in":"out"));
  }
}

Added

This could be a good start at a concurrent lock-free version. These things are notoriously difficult to test so I cannot guarantee this will work but to my mind it certainly should.

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicReferenceArray;


public class LFDawg {
  // All my children.
  AtomicReferenceArray<LFDawg> children = new AtomicReferenceArray<LFDawg> ( 256 );
  // Am I a leaf.
  boolean isLeaf = false;

  // Add a new word.
  public void add ( byte[] word ) {
    // Finds its location, growing as necessary.
    LFDawg loc = find( word, 0, true );
    loc.isLeaf = true;
  }

  // String form.
  public void add ( String word ) {
    add( word.getBytes() );
  }

  // Returns true if word is in the dawg.
  public boolean contains ( byte[] word ) {
    // Finds its location, no growing allowed.
    LFDawg d = find( word, 0, false );
    return d != null && d.isLeaf;
  }

  // String form.
  public boolean contains ( String word ) {
    return contains( word.getBytes() );
  }

  // Find the Dawg - growing the tree as necessary if requested.
  private LFDawg find ( byte[] word, int i, boolean grow ) {
    LFDawg child = children.get( word[i] );
    if ( child == null ) {
      // Not present!
      if ( grow ) {
        // Grow the tree.
        child = new LFDawg();
        if ( !children.compareAndSet( word[i], null, child ) ) {
          // Someone else got there before me. Get the one they set.
          child = children.get( word[i] );
        }
      }
    }
    // Found it?
    if ( child != null ) {
      // More to find?
      if ( i < word.length - 1 ) {
        child = child.find( word, i + 1, grow );
      }
    }
    return child;
  }

  public static void main ( String[] args ) {
    LFDawg d = new LFDawg();
    d.add( "H" );
    d.add( "Hello" );
    d.add( "World" );
    d.add( "Hell" );
    System.out.println( "Hello is " + ( d.contains( "Hello" ) ? "in" : "out" ) );
    System.out.println( "World is " + ( d.contains( "World" ) ? "in" : "out" ) );
    System.out.println( "Hell is " + ( d.contains( "Hell" ) ? "in" : "out" ) );
    System.out.println( "Hal is " + ( d.contains( "Hal" ) ? "in" : "out" ) );
    System.out.println( "Hel is " + ( d.contains( "Hel" ) ? "in" : "out" ) );
    System.out.println( "H is " + ( d.contains( "H" ) ? "in" : "out" ) );
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah you are right, I would hash hashes which sounds awful. But I couldn't think about another way using prebuilt data-structures. I thought about Tries, too, but they have lookups in O(log n) rather O(1) a HashSet has - or am I wrong about that? Besides, if I can override the hash-method of the HashSet, I could put my data directly into that, preventing the hashing of hashes. (But I couldn't see how to do it in the JavaDoc of HashSet.) –  Florian Pilz Jan 2 '12 at 14:21
1  
@FlorianPilz the (worst case) access time of a Trie is indeed O(log n), where n = number of "characters" in your "word". But since hashes all have the same length, this is irrelevant, as n is always the same. Also, keep in mind that O(1) is allowed to take longer than even O(e^n) for small n and its only the asymptote that is part of the O()-notation. –  nd. Jan 2 '12 at 14:49
1  
@nd Thanks for your comment. If I understand you right, the Trie would have O(1) best-case and worst-case, since the length of my words is constant. After some more reading I understand that HashMap and Trie are comparable in speed (especially in this scenario), so Paul is right: A Trie would be better, since I don't loose speed, but save memory and have a better worst-case runtime complexity. If I got it right, this solution yields a guaranteed O(2 * n) runtime complexity, if may arrays contain n hashes. Correct? –  Florian Pilz Jan 2 '12 at 14:59
1  
@Florian - Yes and No. Once the dawg is built your maximum search depth for each key is the width of the hash - 1 (because if you hit the hash length you've found a match). n does not enter into the equation at all which makes searching essentially O(1). –  OldCurmudgeon Jan 2 '12 at 15:04
1  
@Paul Thanks for the added source code, however I'm looking for a DAWG / Trie that can be filled and read in parallel. This way I can use the 8 cores when adding all hashes of the first array. I hope such an concurrent DAWG / Trie implementation is out there. But I'm still not sure if this is the best solution. Maybe there is an idea like dynamic programming to lower the complexity by an order of magnitude. –  Florian Pilz Jan 2 '12 at 15:04

A simpler approach would be to just split the first array into N equal (or near-equal) parts (with 8 cores, n=8 seems reasonable). Then solve the program in the "normal" way, by looking if any hashes in the 2nd array are present in the N smaller sub-first-arrays. This can be done in parallel.

That said, I've never heard of tries/dawgs before and I found the main discussion fascinating and informative. (I mainly work with numbers, not words)

This assumes that the byte[] hashes are of some finite, shortish length so that you really can split up the original file to process in parallel. Is that the case?

EDIT ADDED

For an example of this idea, see GPU Graphics Gems, edited by Wen-Mei W. Hwu, chapter 11, an article by Ligowski, Rudnicki, Liu and Schmidt. They parallelize a massive protein sequence database search by splitting the huge single database into many smaller pieces, then run the normal algorithm on each subpiece. I like this quote. "The described algorithm is embarrassingly parallel". In their case they used CUDA and had to do a lot of memory optimization, but the principle should still apply to multi-core machines.

semi-PSEUDOCODE FOLLOWS. I'll use Lists for the incoming byte[] hashes, hope that's o.k.

Original, 1 core method

originalProcess(List<byte[]> list1, List<byte[]> list2) {
   HashSet<byte[]> bigHugeHashOfList1 = new HashSet<byte[]>();
   bigHugeHashOfList1.addAll(list1);
   for (byte[] hash : list2)
      if (bigHugeHashOfList1.contains(hash)
         // do something
}

New method. Uses exact same process method (later on). No DAWGS or TRIES here...

preprocess(List<byte[]> list1, List<byte[]> list2) {
   List<byte[]>[] splitLists = new ArrayList<byte[]>[8];
   for (int i=0; i<8; i++)
      splitLists[i] = new ArrayList<byte[]>();
   for (byte[] hash : list1) {
      int idx = hash[0]&7; // I'm taking the 3 low order bits, YMMV
      splitLists[idx].add(hash);
      // a minor speedup would be to create the HashSet here instead of in originalProcess()
   }

   // now, using your favorite parallel/concurrency technique,
   // do the equivalent of
   for (int i=0; i<8; i++)
      originalProcess(splitLists[i], list2);
}    
share|improve this answer
1  
Your approach is possible and simpler, but less efficient. Testing if an element is inside an Arrays of length n costs up to O(n), because you have to iterate through the array. HashMaps and Tries perform lookups in O(1), which is way faster. (Sidenote: Tries can normally have a lookup time of O(m), where m is the length of the word. In this special case all words have the same (constant) length, therefore it has no effect on the big-O-notation.) –  Florian Pilz Jan 2 '12 at 17:17
1  
You could still use a HashMap for the N smaller sub-problems. Just like your original single-core solution. That's what I meant by the "normal" way. An advantage is that they need not be Concurrent. –  user949300 Jan 2 '12 at 17:39
1  
You could split across 8 cores by taking the first 3 bits of the hash as a discriminator. This would be an excellent first step. –  OldCurmudgeon Jan 2 '12 at 19:00
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Yeah, a hash would be better. But now it's the exact same solution I proposed with the ConcurrentHashSet. @Paul You are right, that would be an excellent first step and I thought about it. I'm not sure if that improves the speed of the algorithm, but requires some clever splitting-algorithm to divide them by the first x bit (remember: the arrays aren't sorted). Maybe you could elaborate on that idea. :) –  Florian Pilz Jan 3 '12 at 9:57
1  
@Florian Yes, it is the exact same solution you proposed with a HashSet. That's the point. You have parallelized "strategically", not "tactically". Please see edits in my answer for more info. –  user949300 Jan 3 '12 at 16:20

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