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Yes, I'm stuck supporting a legacy ASP application. I currently have VS2008 installed but it complains incessantly about the ASP and VBScript I am dealing with. What would be a better IDE to use to make it less sucky?

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closed as not constructive by Wesley Murch, Abizern, jonsca, unkulunkulu, ЯegDwight Sep 5 '12 at 10:09

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17 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Well, what do you know. No sooner do I ask then SP1 for Visual Studio 2008 is released with support for Classic ASP intellisense!

Wonderful!

Update: I've been using VS2008 for a few weeks now. It is perfect for my needs and I can recommend it as a viable IDE for Classic ASP and VBScript

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1  
I've had no luck getting intellisense to work for classic ASP except for a few rare reserved words that also apply to VB.Net. Any tips? –  Cory House Dec 23 '08 at 2:11
    
Have you tried installing SP1? –  iSid Sep 3 '10 at 6:07
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VS works great (I use 2008 & 2010). but intellisense does not read include files :-( –  gordatron Jan 25 '11 at 16:56
    
VS2010 works OK but Intellisense gets in the way as I think it assumes you're using VB6 instead of VBScript. VS2008 works fine. –  Joe N Sep 28 '11 at 4:01
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I don't know whether MS still support it, but the IDE back then was Visual Interdev.

If your company's got an ancient Asp app chances are they'll still have Interdev licenses somewhere.

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There is a free tools from Microsoft call Visual Web developer 2008 express edition. Works even better then Interdev(which does not work to well with C#) and funny thing -- it does not care if I work with C#, ASP.NET or VBScript-- doing any of those with ease!!!

And one more small thing-- I hate Dreamweaver because in more then one occasion it messed up perfectly fine classic ASP code replacing code with some unreadable gibberish. Long ago I learned that Dreamweaver is good only for 2 things-- html and slicing images.

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Back in the day I used Interdev, and I remember how hard it was to attach to running IIS process with Interdev. Maybe this will help fellow developers still stuck with classic ASP debugging. I've been using Team Remote ASP Debugger ( aspdebugger.com ) for years to debug classic ASP. Saved me time and tears back in the day. Hope this helps. –  Art Aroustamoff Sep 30 '12 at 19:22
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You could try Notepad2 or PSPad, which are free.

If you're willing to spend a bit of money, there's Homesite at $99, though it hasn't been updated in a while and feels a little dated, though it's still one of the best out there IMO. You could also try WeBuilder which looks a bit better, and is a bit cheaper than Homesite at $50 - $70.

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I used HomeSite for many years but after they got bought up I switched over to HTML Kit. It's basically the best features of Homesite 4, with plugins - including useful tools like regular expression search-and-replace. The free version is a good tool to have around.

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Try http://aspexpress.com/aspxprs.asp or the original ASP editor: Notepad.

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For a fully fledged IDE try and track down Visual Interdev, but there are a couple of nice text editors with good support for Classic ASP. My personal favorites are UltraEdit (commercial) and Notepad++ (OSS). UltraEdit is also a great general purpose text editor that will let you open huge files that other editors sometimes choke on (e.g. Apache log files)...

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Macromedia Dreamweaver

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AFAIK there is no official IDE for classic ASP and VBScript.

Simly use a text editor with syntax highlight like Notepad++

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Dreamweaver also supports ASP in it's editor and is good at keeping HTML clean... Your other option (besides the previously mentioned InterDev) is, dare I say it, Frontpage.

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I use e-texteditor which has support for Classic ASP via textmate-bundles. I had to do some (minor) changes to the syntax files to get the codebrowser working. I also have made (major) changes to the CTags-bundle so i can jump to function definitions via .

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VS2003 has full support for classic ASP development.

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I prefer VS2003 - works perfectly with ASP classic.

VS2005 works too (but needs SP1 to get classic ASP debugging working (and even so, that's by running a macro to attach the debugger to your browser process).

As others have said, 2008 should work... but I've not tried it.

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On the Mac, Coda has decent support for ASP.

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1  
Mac + ASP ?? really? –  Eduardo Molteni Nov 24 '09 at 12:03
    
Not by choice. It's more like... I'm on a Mac and occasionally a freelance client will require something done in ASP. –  philfreo Nov 24 '09 at 18:52
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You could use primalscript, personally I think it works great.

Yvan

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Having to work with Classic ASP a lot at work, I've really found Homesite 5 to be very useful.

It's probably not much different than Notepad++ but it's IntelliSense feature works for me.

http://www.adobe.com/products/homesite/


I've recently switched (at work) to Vista (just in time for Windows 7 to come out) and running Homesite isn't an option so I decided to switch and I've started using MS Visual Web Developer 2008 Express (the express makes it "free") and it does all the Homesite did plus it's from Microsoft so moving old work to .NET framework becomes much easier and IT'S FREE.

http://www.microsoft.com/express/downloads/#2008-Visual-Web-Developer

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