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I'm attempting to use the Microsoft crypto APIs to compute an MD5 hash, but I'm getting incorrect hashes:

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <wincrypt.h>

char* HashMD5(char* data, DWORD *result)
{
    DWORD dwStatus = 0;
    DWORD cbHash = 16;
    int i = 0;
    HCRYPTPROV cryptProv;
    HCRYPTHASH cryptHash;
    BYTE hash[16];
    char *hex = "01234567879abcdef";
    char *strHash = "00000000000000000000000000000000";
    if(!CryptAcquireContext(&cryptProv, NULL, MS_DEF_PROV, PROV_RSA_FULL, CRYPT_VERIFYCONTEXT))
    {
        dwStatus = GetLastError();
        printf("CryptAcquireContext failed: %d\n", dwStatus);
        *result = dwStatus;
        return NULL;
    }
    if(!CryptCreateHash(cryptProv, CALG_MD5, 0, 0, &cryptHash))
    {
        dwStatus = GetLastError();
        printf("CryptCreateHash failed: %d\n", dwStatus);
        CryptReleaseContext(cryptProv, 0);
        *result = dwStatus;
        return NULL;
    }
    if(!CryptHashData(cryptHash, (BYTE*)data, strlen(data), 0))
    {
        dwStatus = GetLastError();
        printf("CryptHashData failed: %d\n", dwStatus);
        CryptReleaseContext(cryptProv, 0);
        CryptDestroyHash(cryptHash);
        *result = dwStatus;
        return NULL;
    }
    if(!CryptGetHashParam(cryptHash, HP_HASHVAL, hash, &cbHash, 0))
    {
        dwStatus = GetLastError();
        printf("CryptGetHashParam failed: %d\n", dwStatus);
        CryptReleaseContext(cryptProv, 0);
        CryptDestroyHash(cryptHash);
        *result = dwStatus;
        return NULL;
    }
    for(i = 0; i < cbHash; i++)
    {
        strHash[i*2]     = hex[hash[i] >> 4];
        strHash[(i*2)+1] = hex[hash[i] & 0xF];
    }
    CryptReleaseContext(cryptProv, 0);
    CryptDestroyHash(cryptHash);
    return strHash;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    DWORD result = 0;
    char* hash;
    if(argc != 2)
    {
        printf("Usage: crypto.exe <word>\n");
        return 0;
    }
    hash = HashMD5(argv[1], &result);
    if(result == 0)
    {
        printf("Hash of '%s' is: %s\n", argv[1], hash);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Failed! Result: %d\n", result);
    }
    return result;
}

The code executes fine, no error message is printed, but the returned hash value is incorrect for certain plaintexts:

$ ./crypto.exe test
Hash of 'test' is: 078e6abc4621c373b9cd4d832627a4e6

$ ./crypto.exe StackOverflow
Hash of 'StackOverflow' is: 84c7cb17766b446e5d4084d8ebd87e82

The latter is correct, but the former should be 098f6bcd4621d373cade4e832627b4f6.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
this is a job for the code review site. –  bmargulies Jan 2 '12 at 14:42
2  
@bmargulies: No, code review is not for failing code. It really belongs here. –  Niklas B. Jan 2 '12 at 14:43
    
According to the code review FAQ, they review code that is working but perhaps not optimal. They also state that code review is not for trouble-shooting. This code is broken and requires trouble-shooting. –  Polynomial Jan 2 '12 at 14:44
1  
Actually both hashes are wrong (although not completely), so I suspect that the conversion to hex is faulty. –  Niklas B. Jan 2 '12 at 14:44
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted
char *hex = "01234567879abcdef";

You have an error in that line.

It should read:

char *hex = "0123456789abcdef";
share|improve this answer
    
*facepalm*... Thanks for spotting that one! –  Polynomial Jan 2 '12 at 14:46
add comment
strHash[i*2]     = hex[hash[i] >> 4];
strHash[(i*2)+1] = hex[hash[i] & 0xF];

strHash points to a string literal. string literal are non-modifiable. Modifying a string literal is undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
I patched the code to use malloc() instead, but still have the same problem. –  Polynomial Jan 2 '12 at 14:45
    
+1: not the problem (as it turns out), but an excellent point nonetheless. –  ruakh Jan 2 '12 at 14:49
    
@Dave the problem is he is returning strHash at the end of the function, so he cannot do that. –  ouah Jan 2 '12 at 15:05
    
aah; didn't read carefully. –  Dave Jan 2 '12 at 15:09
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