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In a B tree you can store both keys and data in the internal/leaf nodes. But in a B+ tree you have to store the data in the leaf nodes only. Is there any advantage of doing the above in a B+ tree? Why not use B trees instead of B+ trees everywhere? As intuitively they seem much faster. I mean why do you need to replicate the key(data) in a B+ tree?

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There is no tree called "B-", it's a "B" tree. Tag Data-structures doesn't mean there are structures of type Data- –  Erandros Sep 27 '11 at 15:05

14 Answers 14

The image below helps show the differences between B+ trees and B trees.

Advantages of B+ trees:

  • Because B+ trees don't have data associated with interior nodes, more keys can fit on a page of memory. Therefore, it will require fewer cache misses in order to access data that is on a leaf node.
  • The leaf nodes of B+ trees are linked, so doing a full scan of all objects in a tree requires just one linear pass through all the leaf nodes. A B tree, on the other hand, would require a traversal of every level in the tree. This full-tree traversal will likely involve more cache misses than the linear traversal of B+ leaves.

Advantage of B trees:

  • Because B trees contain data with each key, frequently accessed nodes can lie closer to the root, and therefore can be accessed more quickly.

B and B+ tree

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Is their any constrain on number of entries in leaf node?? –  TLE Feb 21 at 1:02
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@TLE Good question! Yes. A hard drive accesses a minimum of a page of memory at a time, so we want to fit all the pointers in a single page of memory. We want to require only one disk read per leaf access, so we don't want to assign more than a page size of pointers to a leaf. If we fill a leaf with a page size of pointers, and then we want to add another pointer to this leaf, we create two children of this node, and give half of the leaf's pointers to each new child. Of course, there may be some reshuffling to ensure the tree's height is kept to a minimum. Does this help? –  Rose Perrone Feb 21 at 5:28
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@RosePerrone Great answer! –  Sahil Sareen Feb 26 at 18:54
    
the last pointer of each leaf node of B-tree should point to the next leaf node, right? –  camino Jun 15 at 21:55
    
@camino that is correct –  Babyburger Jun 23 at 12:35

The principal advantage of B+ trees over B trees is they allow you to in pack more pointers to other nodes by removing pointers to data, thus increasing the fanout and potentially decreasing the depth of the tree.

The disadvantage is that there are no early outs when you might have found a match in an internal node. But since both data structures have huge fanouts, the vast majority of your matches will be on leaf nodes anyway, making on average the B+ tree more efficient.

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I prefer Jeff's answer, because it emphasizes the difference in efficiency when doing a full scan. –  Rose Perrone Aug 17 '12 at 23:06

B+Trees are much easier and higher performing to do a full scan, as in look at every piece of data that the tree indexes, since the terminal nodes form a linked list. To do a full scan with a B-Tree you need to do a full tree traversal to find all the data.

B-Trees on the other hand can be faster when you do a seek (looking for a specific piece of data by key) especially when the tree resides in RAM or other non-block storage. Since you can elevate commonly used nodes in the tree there are less comparisons required to get to the data.

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Define "much faster". Asymptotically they're about the same. The differences lie in how they make use of secondary storage. The Wikipedia articles on B-trees and B+trees look pretty trustworthy.

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I agree with Charlie. Since one node of a B-Tree represents one secondary memory page or block, the passage from one node to another requires a time consuming page-change. –  Dean Toader Jan 2 '13 at 8:49

In B+ Tree, since only pointers are stored in the internal nodes, their size becomes significantly smaller than the internal nodes of B tree (which store both data+key). Hence, the indexes of the B+ tree can be fetched from the external storage in a single disk read, processed to find the location of the target. If it has been a B tree, a disk read is required for each and every decision making process. Hope I made my point clear! :)

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Adegoke A, Amit

I guess one crucial point you people are missing is difference between data and pointers as explained in this section.

Pointer : pointer to other nodes.

Data :- In context of database indexes, data is just another pointer to real data (row) which reside somewhere else.

Hence in case of B tree each node has three information keys, pointers to data associated with the keys and pointer to child nodes.

In B+ tree internal node keep keys and pointers to child node while leaf node keep keys and pointers to associated data. This allows more number of key for a given size of node. Size of node is determined mainly by block size.

Advantage of having more key per node is explained well above so I will save my typing effort.

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  1. In a B tree search keys and data stored in internal or leaf nodes. But in B+-tree data store only leaf nodes.
  2. Searching of any data in a B+ tree is very easy because all data are found in leaf nodes otherwise in a B tree data cannot found in leaf node.
  3. In B tree data may found leaf or non leaf node. Deletion of non leaf node is very complicated. Otherwise in a B+ tree data must found leaf node. So deletion is easy in leaf node.
  4. Insertion of a B tree is more complicated than B+ tree.
  5. B +tree store redundant search key but b-tree has no redundant value.
  6. In B+ tree leaf node data are ordered in a sequential linked list but in B tree the leaf node cannot stored using linked list. Many database system implementers prefer the structural simplicity of a b+ tree.

I take this from the following blog post:Difference between B and B+ tree in database

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B+ Trees are especially good in block-based storage (eg: hard disk). with this in mind, you get several advantages, for example (from the top of my head):

  • high fanout / low depth: that means you have to get less blocks to get to the data. with data intermingled with the pointers, each read gets less pointers, so you need more seeks to get to the data

  • simple and consistent block storage: an inner node has N pointers, nothing else, a leaf node has data, nothing else. that makes it easy to parse, debug and even reconstruct.

  • high key density means the top nodes are almost certainly on cache, in many cases all inner nodes get quickly cached, so only the data access has to go to disk.

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What are b-tree's good for? –  Malfist May 15 '09 at 20:01
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mostly for in-memory trees; but there are other popular options, like red-black trees, skip lists, and such. –  Javier May 15 '09 at 21:31
    
B-trees are also designed for efficient block-based storage, limiting the asymptotic number of node accesses. Otherwise, if using a memory-like storage medium with random access, one can use a self-balancing binary tree such as a red-black tree to achieve better results. –  dionyziz Feb 1 '12 at 9:44
    
shouldn't your first point say "less seeks" rather than "more seeks". Smaller depth -> less seeks –  Jesse May 9 '12 at 16:30
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@AdegokeA: a B+tree has two kinds of nodes: inner nodes with only keys and pointers, no data; and leaf nodes, with data and no pointers. that allows for maximum number of keys on each inner node. if you store data on an inner node, then you can fit less pointers and your tree gets taller. –  Javier Apr 18 '13 at 13:38

A B+tree is a balanced tree in which every path from the root of the tree to a leaf is of the same length, and each nonleaf node of the tree has between [n/2] and [n] children, where n is fixed for a particular tree. It contains index pages and data pages. Binary trees only have two children per parent node, B+ trees can have a variable number of children for each parent node

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Take one example - you have a table with huge data per row. That means every instance of the object is Big.

If you use B tree here then most of the time is spent scanning the pages with data - which is of no use. In databases that is the reason of using B+ Trees to avoid scanning object data.

B+ Trees separate keys from data.

But if your data size is less then you can store them with key which is what B tree does.

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"If you use B tree here then most of the time is spent scanning the pages with data" - not necessary. B-tree nodes can keep only "pointers" to data on disc, not data itself. –  TT_ Dec 23 '13 at 23:24

The primary distinction between B-tree and B+tree is that B-tree eliminates the redundant storage of search key values.Since search keys are not repeated in the B-tree,we may not be able to store the index using fewer tree nodes than in corresponding B+tree index.However,since search key that appear in non-leaf nodes appear nowhere else in B-tree,we are forced to include an additional pointer field for each search key in a non-leaf node. Their are space advantages for B-tree, as repetition does not occur and can be used for large indices.

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One possible use of B+ tress is that it is suitable for situations where the tree grows so large that it need not fit into available memory. Thus, you'd generally expect to be doing multiple I/O's. Often it does happen that a B+ tree is used even when it in fact fits into memory, and then your cache manager might keep it there permanently. But this is a special case, not the general one, and caching policy is a separate from B+ tree maintenance as such.

Also, in a B+ tree, the leaf pages are linked together in a linked list (or doubly-linked list), which optimizes traversals (for range searches, sorting, etc.). So the number of pointers is a function of the specific algorithm that is used.

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What about B- trees? –  Malfist May 15 '09 at 18:54
    
This is in answer to the question that why should we not use B-trees instead of B+ trees everywhere :) –  stack programmer May 15 '09 at 19:20
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But you only described one side, as far as we know, with your answer b-trees could function exactly the same way. The OP asked to explain the differences and you only talked about one and not the other. You can't have a venn diagram with one circle! –  Malfist May 15 '09 at 20:00

**

The major drawback of B-Tree is the difficulty of Traversing the keys sequentially. The B+ Tree retains the rapid random access property of the B-Tree while also allowing rapid sequential access

** ref: Data Structures Using C// Author: Aaro M Tenenbaum

http://books.google.co.in/books?id=X0Cd1Pr2W0gC&pg=PA456&lpg=PA456&dq=drawback+of+B-Tree+is+the+difficulty+of+Traversing+the+keys+sequentially&source=bl&ots=pGcPQSEJMS&sig=F9MY7zEXYAMVKl_Sg4W-0LTRor8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=nD5AUbeeH4zwrQe12oCYAQ&ved=0CDsQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=drawback%20of%20B-Tree%20is%20the%20difficulty%20of%20Traversing%20the%20keys%20sequentially&f=false

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Example from Database system concepts 5th

B+-tree B+tree

corresponding B-tree Btree

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