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I have a structure which contains some elements, i free the memory of this structure in a loop, roughly like:

for (i = 0; i < teller; i++) {
   free((glycan+i)->desc);
}
free(glycan)

I assume that the pointers are still pointing to the empty memory blocks, therefore i wanted to set them to NULL as follows:

for (i = teller; i > 0; i--) {
    (glycan+i)->desc = NULL;
}
glycan = NULL;

Valgrind however tells me something which i don't really understand:

==11783== Invalid write of size 4
==11783==    at 0x8048F49: main (spectral_matcher.c:122)
==11783==  Address 0x431c070 is 72 bytes inside a block of size 28,000 free'd
==11783==    at 0x4027C02: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:366)
==11783==    by 0x8048F2C: main (spectral_matcher.c:121)

Can anyone explain to me why this warning/error occurs and what i should do differently not to solve it?

EDIT: I am aware that i am setting the pointer to NULL after freeing, freeing only marks the memory as free so the pointer is still intact (if i'm not mistaking) which i subsequently wish to set to NULL.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Once you free the variable glycan you can't touch (glycan+i)->desc anymore - nor does it make sense.

About the sense part: just think of it, if you say glycan = NULL, why would you care for the individual elements' members ?

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I always understood that free only clears the values within the memory block but that the pointer than points to an empty memory block, am i wrong on that? –  Bas Jansen Jan 2 '12 at 15:09
1  
@BasJansen Actually you got it wrong. Free marks the memory as "free" but on most implementations it doesn't actually change its contents. So accessing "freed" memory is always undefined behavior. –  cnicutar Jan 2 '12 at 15:10
2  
If you set anything to NULL, you can set glycan to NULL, but anything pointed to by glycan is no longer yours and you should not touch it. (Note that setting glycan to NULL really does nothing to help you except perhaps help you catch invalid accesses later.) –  Dark Falcon Jan 2 '12 at 15:17
1  
@BasJansen It's not sad. Yes, the pointer itself is yours so you may make it point to anything, it's perfectly legal. BUT, (glycan+i)->desc changes the memory formerly pointed by glycan, which you freed. –  cnicutar Jan 3 '12 at 12:58
1  
@BasJansen Yes, but where is the actual desc stored ? Inside the memory pointed by glycan. –  cnicutar Jan 3 '12 at 13:28

The problem was you were de-referencing a free()'ed pointer to set that to NULL.

Now, try this!

for (i = 0; i < teller; i++) {
    free((glycan+i)->desc);
    (glycan+i)->desc = NULL;
}

free(glycan)
glycan = NULL;

Setting it to NULL make sense if you are going to re-use the same variable to malloc() some memory and don't want the program to crash if some module access that without checking for NULL

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You are setting (glycan+i)->desc to NULL after glycan has been freed.

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