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We use single table inheritance for every table in our application. This allows different instances of the same application stack to work with the same DAOs while their entities might differ slightly potentially containing information unique to that instance. An abstract class defines the basic table structure and an extension defines additional columns, if needed by that instance:

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.SINGLE_TABLE)
@Table(name = "client")
public abstract class Client extends AbstractPersistable<Long> {
    // ...
}

application A:

@Entity
public class ClientSimple extends Client {
    private String name;
    // getter, setter
}

application B:

@Entity
public class ClientAdvanced extends Client {
    private String description;
    // getter, setter
}

Now a DAO can work with Client objects for application A and B but application B can define additional information for its client object that may be read by a manager method unique to application B:

application A:

Client client = new ClientSimple();
clientDao.save(client);

application B:

Client client = new ClientAdvanced();
clientDao.save(client);

Unfortunately this means there is a DTYPE column in every table (or any other name that I might choose). Is there any way to get rid of this? We don't need it and it's using up DB space...

Thanks!


EDIT

Important to note: @MappedSuperclass won't work. We're using QueryDSL as our HQL abstraction layer. This requires automatically generated Query Type classes for type save querying. These however will only be generated correctly if the abstract class is annotated with @Entity.

This is neccessairy because we want to query against the abstract class Client while in truth querying ClientSimple in application A and ClientAdvanced in application B:

So in any application this will work:

query.where(QClient.client.name.equals("something");

and in application B this will work:

query.where(QClientSimple.client.description.equals("something else");

EDIT2 - boil down

It seems to boil down to this: Can I configure hibernate at deploy time to set the discriminator type for an inhertited entity to a fixed value. So going with my example a Client will always be ClientSimple in one application and ClientAdvanced in the other so that I don't have to store that information in the database?

Like I said: Each application will be an instance of the base application stack. Each application might define additional columns for their local database but ALL objects will be of the same type for that instance so we guarantee that the discriminator is always the same making it redundant in the database and a use case for hibernate configuration.

share|improve this question
    
Which Querydsl version are you using? – Timo Westkämper Jan 3 '12 at 11:57
    
We're using QueryDSL 2.2.3 but could update if newer versions support mapped superclasses as query targets: like this: @MappedSuperclass @Table public abstract class Client ... + @Entity public class ClientSimple extends Client ==> generate query types... ==> query: QClient.client.name – Pete Jan 3 '12 at 12:15
1  
It's not supported directly, but you can add a ticket for it on GitHub. It's easily implemented. – Timo Westkämper Jan 3 '12 at 14:25
    
Alright, did that. Hoping to see it implemented soon ;) We still have some time before going life with this but it would still be good to know if we can go with @MappedSuperclass or with some kind of Hibernate setup or class overrides.. – Pete Jan 3 '12 at 14:54
    
I know this isn't the proper place to ask, but what if I'm inheriting an entity that belongs to a framework and thus I can't change the superclass? Hibernate is spitting out this DTYPE column that doesn't exist. How can I avoid it? – Igor Donin May 19 '15 at 17:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you never need to use both ClientSimple and ClientAdvanced in the same application you can declare Client as @MappedSuperclass rather than @Entity.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately that's not possible. We're using query DSL as our HQL abstraction layer. This requires the abstract classes to be annotated @Entity so that a query can be run against the abstract class while in fact querying the extension. I'll edit my post to reflect this limitation. – Pete Jan 2 '12 at 15:45

I know, this is a very old question, but I encountered this problem recently and this might prove useful to someone.

This can be done using Hibernate's @DiscriminatorFormula annotation. The following description is based on the book Java Persistence with Hibernate, section 5.1.3; the relevant part begins at page the last paragraph on page 202.

With @DiscriminatorFormula you can provide an SQL statement that determines the value of the discriminator while fetching the relevant rows from the database. In your case, it would have to be a simple string that evaluates to some arbitrarily selected value. For this to work, you need to decide upon a name that would be used for your Client entity. Suppose that you select 'GenericClient' as the name of the entity. This is the name that should appear within @Entity annotation as the value of the name attribute. So, the complete example, in your case would look like the following.

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.SINGLE_TABLE)
@Table(name = "client")
@DiscriminatorFormula("'GenericClient'")  // *1*
public abstract class Client extends AbstractPersistable<Long> {
    // ...
}

// Application A
@Entity
@DiscriminatorValue("GenericClient")  // *2*
public class SimpleClient extends Client {
    // ...
}


// Application B
@Entity
@DiscriminatorValue("GenericClient")  // *3*
public class AdvancedClient extends Client {
    // ...
}

The line that is denoted by '1' is a part of the SQL snippet that will always return 'GenericClient' as its value. The subclasses of the Client should always be annotated with the @DiscriminatorValue("GenericClient"). What this means is that when Hibernate fetches the rows from the DB, the type of the object to be constructed would always be the specific subclass of Client.

If the package where the subclasses of Client reside, and the name of the subclasses are fixed:

In that case, the @DiscriminatorValue("GenericClient") on the sub-classes wouldn't be required, all you would need to do is:

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.SINGLE_TABLE)
@Table(name = "client")
@DiscriminatorFormula("'com.example.fixed.path.FixedSubClassName'")
public abstract class Client extends AbstractPersistable<Long> {
    // ...
}

The subclasses wouldn't need any annotations. The discriminator-value defaults to the entity-name, which itself defaults to the fully-qualified class-name.

Note: The SQL statement inside @DiscriminatorFormula() can be any valid SQL statement for your targeted DB server.

share|improve this answer

In Hibernate, Single Table per Class hierarchy would always need a discriminator column to distinguish between the entities as all classes in one hierarchy are stored in one table. Here is an example of Hibernate Single Table per Class Hierarchy.

But you may want to consider a different Hierarchy scheme like below:

Hibernate Single Table per Subclass

Advantages

  • Using this hierarchy, does not require complex changes to the database schema when a single parent class is modified.
  • It works well with shallow hierarchy.

Disadvantages

  • As the hierarchy grows, it may result in poor performance.
  • The number of joins required to construct a subclass also grows.

Hibernate Single Table per Concrete class

Advantages

  • This is the easiest method of Inheritance mapping to implement.

Disadvantages

  • Data thats belongs to a parent class is scattered across a number of subclass tables, which represents concrete classes.
  • This hierarchy is not recommended for most cases.
  • Changes to a parent class is reflected to large number of tables
  • A query couched in terms of parent class is likely to cause a large number of select operations

I would suggest you to have a look at Single Table Per Subclass scheme. Although I am not sure about your exact requirement. But this may help.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you absolutely certain there is no way to write some custom deserializer? I am not a hibernate expert, but I bet if we looked at the way hibernate converts the ResultSet to object, there is a way to customize it the way Pete wants. – guy mograbi Jan 3 '12 at 7:49
    
Thanks for the links viralpatel, good read but unfortunately it doesn't really help. Maybe this cannot be done with just annotations, like guy mograbi hints...?! – Pete Jan 3 '12 at 8:38
    
Hi Guy, Well its certain that you can override many default functionality of open frameworks like Hibernate. But the problem with this one (Table per Hierarchy) is that your data is stored in single table. And there must be a column to identify which data row belongs to which Class in hierarchy. – Viral Patel Jan 3 '12 at 8:38

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