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I want to list all files of the current directory, so I have this code :

int WLoader::listdir(void)
{
    WIN32_FIND_DATA data;
    std::wstring path(L"*");
    std::wstring *name;
    HANDLE hFile = FindFirstFile(path.c_str(), &data);

    if  (hFile == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
       return (-1);

    while(FindNextFile(hFile, &data) != 0 || GetLastError() != ERROR_NO_MORE_FILES)
    {
        std::cout << data.cFileName << std::endl;
    }
    return (0);
}

For unknown reasons, my program is displaying this result :

0029F29C
0029F29C
0029F29C
0029F29C
0029F29C
0029F29C

Can someone help me please?

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1  
It appears to be outputting the cFileName element's address pointer instead of the string it contains. Have you tried just using printf() instead? –  Nick Shaw Jan 2 '12 at 15:31
    
yeah it works with printf, but i need to have cFileName into a string, because i need it to open a dll. so i think if i can't write the right name of the file, i can't have the right name into a string. –  Adrien A. Jan 2 '12 at 15:34
    
@NickShaw: That's a terrible idea. There's clearly something up with what he's trying to stream; reverting to the stone-age only possibly masks that problem, and possibly makes it worse. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 2 '12 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The WIN32_FIND_DATA structure's member cFileName is a TCHAR[N], and TCHAR is a Windows type alias that maps either to char or wchar_t. Problem is, you don't know which one it will be when you write your code.

Depending on your build settings, you either have a char*, or a wchar_t*; one should be used with std::cout and the other must be used with std::wcout. But which one do you use?!

Fortunately, there's a macro to find out which is in use when you compile:

while(FindNextFile(hFile, &data) != 0 || GetLastError() != ERROR_NO_MORE_FILES) {
#ifdef UNICODE
   std::wcout << data.cFileName << std::endl;
#else
   std::cout << data.cFileName << std::endl;
#endif
}

You're going to find the same problem if you try to assign the filename to a std::string/std::wstring. That's what you get for using the Windows API. :)


One way around this is to define macros for the output stream and for strings.

So, somewhere at the top of your program:

#ifdef UNICODE
#define STDCOUT std::wcout
#define STDSTR  std::wstring
#else
#define STDCOUT std::cout
#define STDSTR  std::string
#endif

Then in your function, all you need is:

while(FindNextFile(hFile, &data) != 0 || GetLastError() != ERROR_NO_MORE_FILES) {
   STDCOUT << data.cFileName << std::endl;
}

and you can use STDSTR elsewhere.

Something to consider.

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ok i see. thanks for your help. –  Adrien A. Jan 2 '12 at 16:30
    
@Yumino: You're very welcome. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 3 '12 at 1:07

You are using std::cout to output a wide-character string. Use std::wcout instead.

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and if i want to put cFileName into a string ? –  Adrien A. Jan 2 '12 at 15:35
    
@Yumino You are already using std::wstring for the path, continue using that. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 2 '12 at 15:38
    
Put it into a wstring –  David Heffernan Jan 2 '12 at 15:38
    
@DavidHeffernan: And then when he turns UNICODE off, he's got the same problem again. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 2 '12 at 15:41
    
@TomalakGeret'kal In Windows programming UNICODE is something that you turn on and then never turn off. Trying to write code that works with UNICODE either on or off makes life needlessly difficult. –  David Heffernan Jan 2 '12 at 15:47

I expect you have a Unicode/ANSI mismatch. To print a Unicode string, use std::wcout

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