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Hello i am programming twin panel file manager in java and i am facing a problem.

Whenever I scroll JTable it takes about 8M more memory... Is there a way how to fix that ? It stops everytime after consuming 40 - 60M of memory. Is it a Swing component problem ?

Thank you for your responses.

Edit

I tried to understand why it takes so much memory. Now i know the source of the problem. I made a small button with this actionPerformed: jScrollPane1.repaint();.

When I hit it 10 times i got big memory consumptions in task manager and also in VisualVM. But in VisualVM GC starts to collect on 50 MB and lowers it to 8 Mb. But windows taskmanager is still increasing its value.

The repaint method is making big memory leaks in windows. Is there any fix ?

Edit2

A further research of this problem gave me this. I tried to run this program on Linux platform with no leaking. The program had about 20 M of memory used. So i've programmed a little thread which was invoking the method repaint on both JScrollPanes. And to my suprise on Windows machine memory was rising until 110 M but then the OS started to push harder on memory.

The Thread:

@Override
public void run() {
        while (true) {
            jScrollPane1.repaint();
            jScrollPane2.repaint();
            try {
                this.sleep(10);
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

I was doing normal copy/rename/delete operations also was going through directories with no memory rising. I noticed that the memory was also decreasing to 99M.

On the monitoring thread:

@Override
public void run() {
    while (true) {
        aLabel.setText("Memory consumption: " + (Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory() - Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory());
        try {
            this.sleep(200);
        } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

the numbers were from 8M to 50M and then again 8M. So garbage collecting was successful. So the real problem is windows platform or the compatibilty of the JVM ? As trashgod suggested that task manager is not precise in getting the memory consumptions but the memory is being really used by the java process.

share|improve this question
    
Is it possible that you open the files / directories and not closing them? – MByD Jan 2 '12 at 15:41
1  
please why your JTable take ..., can you explains, post a sscce.org, everything another are shots to the dark – mKorbel Jan 2 '12 at 15:42
1  
8K is nothing. It could come from the graphics that must be updated, from the temporary objects created by the renderer, you just shouldn't care. – JB Nizet Jan 2 '12 at 15:42
1  
60-80K? Still don't care. Did you profile this to know where the memory is being consumed, or are you just assuming it's JTable? – duffymo Jan 2 '12 at 15:56
1  
The garbage collector will probably reclaim this memory when it feels it should, which might mean some time later, or never, because there is plenty of memory available and there is no need to GC. – JB Nizet Jan 2 '12 at 16:05

Invoking FileSystemView.getFileSystemView() repeatedly may be a problem, as suggested here and profiled here. It may help to edit your question to include an sscce that demonstrates the problem. Using a profiler may suggest the scope and severity of the problem; Java VisualVM may already be installed.

Windows task manager is still increasing its value.

The Windows task manager may not be entirely dispositive, as suggested here. In this context, the jvisualvm result may be more reliable.

share|improve this answer
    
I figured it out I think. I spent 3 hours of testing and came to this conclusion... I run my program on Windows Platform and run VisualVM. Also i made a small thread which was monitoring Runtime freememory. I always get maximum used memory in heap 11 Mb. But Windows task manager is giving me numbers like 70 - 180 Mb. So... I run it on Linux machine and task manager gave me 20 Mb and 30 max. So i think microsoft has some bad task enumerating or something. – Animator Jan 2 '12 at 19:09
    
As @JB Nizet observed above, the there may be no problem. I suspect that the Windows task manager result may be misleading, as suggested in these comments. See also this related answer. – trashgod Jan 2 '12 at 19:26
    
I tried to understand why it takes so much memory. Now i know the source of the problem. I made a small button with this actionPerformed: jScrollPane1.repaint();. When I hit it 10 times i got big memory consumptions in task manager and also in VisualVM. But in VisualVM GC starts to collect on 50 MB and lowers it to 8 Mb. But windows taskmanager is still increasing its value. I think there should be some fix for the repainting of the jScrollPane when scrolling... – Animator Jan 2 '12 at 19:48
    
Yes but, that memory which is in the task manager is really being used! I've tested it and got OutOfMemoryException. – Animator Jan 3 '12 at 8:03

never use Thread#sleep during EDT, that reason why you get un_expecting UsedMemory,

1) Swing GUI is single threaded

2) Swing GUI waits for all events done, all changes are done on screen in one moment, including usage of Thread#sleep,

3) by using Thread#sleep you can simulating and see on the screen un_expected repaint of GUI, or value aren't refreshed or repainted

4) you have issues with Concurency in Swing

5) I can't see any reason for using repaint() there, notice that very hard method for local enviroment

6) use and wrap you code to the

7) since I have a few methods when is required (deliberate) usage Thread#sleep, not easy job without Controler covered whole EDT

share|improve this answer
    
These two threads are invoked because of testing. The repaint method was causing heavy memory loads so I made a thread which was invoking the repaint method automatically. – Animator Jan 3 '12 at 9:58
    
Also the threads are not the source of unexpected usedMemory - the repaint method is the source. I don't know what do you mean with this answer to my problem at all. – Animator Jan 3 '12 at 10:04
    
redirect that to the SwingWorker or Runnable#Thread, by delaing SwingxTimer or util#Timer, then you can testing whatever in SWing GUI correctly, otherwise your test shouldn't be accurated, there nothing about Java Esential Classes, there going about GUI, and lots of these methods came from Native OS – mKorbel Jan 3 '12 at 10:04
1  
@islander: What problem are you trying to solve by repainting scroll panes at such high frequency? Please provide an sscce that exhibits the problem you describe. – trashgod Jan 3 '12 at 12:04
1  
@trashgod that right (:- but most peoples that comings here working on top secrets project for their Authority, then why did you suprised :-) – mKorbel Jan 3 '12 at 12:17

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