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Code:

struct Base { ... };

struct A : public Base { ... };
struct B : public Base { ... };
struct C : public Base { ... };

Is it possible to create an array, that holds that types of struct? sample/expected result:

Type inheritedTypesOfStruct[3] = {A, B, C};

The purpose of this is that I later want to create an object with a random class retrieved from the array.

share|improve this question
    
you mean like that: vector<Base> v; –  juergen d Jan 2 '12 at 15:44
3  
Do you want an array of the types themselves? Or an array of objects of the types? –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 2 '12 at 15:46
1  
@BenjaminLindley: Obviously he wants an array of types. The usage of Base as the array item type is misleading, however. –  Niklas B. Jan 2 '12 at 15:47
    
An array of types. I need that, because I'm going to create obj/struct of random type in future. –  justi Jan 2 '12 at 15:49
2  
@NiklasBaumstark: It's not obvious to me. A lot of people on here don't communicate their intentions effectively, either because they're not fluent in programming terminology, or they're not fluent in English. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 2 '12 at 15:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;




// interface
class Base
{
public:
    virtual ~Base() { }
    virtual int getClassId() = 0;
};


// class A relizes interface Base, has ID == 1 (is used in automatic registration to factory)
class A : public Base
{
public:
    const static int ID = 1;
    static Base* CreateInstance()
    {
        return new A();
    }

    virtual int getClassId()
    {
        return ID;
    }

    virtual ~A() { }
};


// class B relizes interface Base, has ID == 2 (is used in automatic registration to factory)
class B : public Base
{
public:
    const static int ID = 2;
    static Base* CreateInstance()
    {
        return new B();
    }

    virtual int getClassId()
    {
        return ID;
    }

    virtual ~B() { }
};



// this is the objects factory, with registration only (unregister s not allowed)
class ObjectFactory
{
    ObjectFactory() { }
    ObjectFactory(ObjectFactory&) { }
public:
    virtual ~ObjectFactory() { }
    static ObjectFactory& instance()
    {
        static ObjectFactory objectFactory;

        return objectFactory;
    }

    typedef Base* (*Creator) ();

    void registerCreator(int id, Creator creator)
    {
        registry[id] = creator;
    }

    Base* CreateById(int id)
    {
        return registry[id]();
    }

private:
    map<int, Creator> registry;
};


// this template class is used for automatic registration of object's creators
template <class T>
struct RegisterToFactory
{
    RegisterToFactory(ObjectFactory& factory)
    {
        factory.registerCreator(T::ID, &T::CreateInstance);
    }
};


namespace
{
    // automaticaly register creators for each class
    RegisterToFactory<A> autoregisterACreator(ObjectFactory::instance());
    RegisterToFactory<B> autoregisterBCreator(ObjectFactory::instance());
}




// lets this this solution
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    vector<int> ids;

    ids.push_back(static_cast<int>(A::ID));
    ids.push_back(static_cast<int>(B::ID));

    srand(time(0));

    for (int i = 0; i < 20; ++i)
    {
        int randomClasssId = ids[rand() % ids.size()];
        auto_ptr<Base> testObject(ObjectFactory::instance().CreateById(randomClasssId));
        cout << "Object of classId = " << testObject->getClassId() << " has been produced by factory." << endl;
    }


    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If You wanna protect the object creator, move static creator to private/protected section, and make this class friend'ed to concrete external creator class. This may be usefull whenever the creation process is complex, and error prone. The external creator has entire knowledge how to properly instantiate objects of this class, so the end-user never fails in here. –  rzur2004 Jan 2 '12 at 18:36
    
i don't recomment using RTTI unless You know the concrete platform, and every module (DLL, SO, LIB ....) has strictly thesame compile and link option. Some older compilers may have problems with RTTI with namespaces and cross module registrations to such factory especialy when we try to register template classes. In general RTTI is week, try not to use it, because RTTI may be disabled at building configuration, and nothig will run. –  rzur2004 Jan 2 '12 at 18:45
    
Ok i try it, thx –  justi Jan 2 '12 at 20:13
    
Works fine, thx! –  justi Jan 8 '12 at 21:25

You could create an array of functions, each of which returns a base pointer(or smart pointer) that each point to objects of your various derived classes. e.g.

typedef std::unique_ptr<Base> base_ptr;

template<typename Derived>
base_ptr CreateObject()
{
    return base_ptr(new Derived);
}

int main()
{
    std::function<base_ptr(void)> f[3] = {
        CreateObject<A>, CreateObject<B>, CreateObject<C>
    };

    base_ptr arr[10];
    for (int i=0; i<10; ++i)
        arr[i] = f[rand()%3]();
}

Here it is in action: http://ideone.com/dg4uq

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, interesting.. –  justi Jan 2 '12 at 16:07
    
I try Your example, but in my compiler doesn't work: is some problem with unique_ptr –  justi Jan 2 '12 at 16:51
1  
@justi: Try including the header <functional>. I should have done that anyway, it just happened that one of the other headers apparently brought it in. If that doesn't work, what compiler(and version) are you using? It's a C++11 feature, so it's possible that either your compiler doesn't support it, or you may need to set some flags. e.g. with g++, you need -std=c++0x. If you can't use c++11, fret not, there are other solutions, but let's try this first. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 2 '12 at 16:56
    
I have default DevCpp environment. I add the header but no results. Adding to compiler -std=c++0x with no positive results. –  justi Jan 2 '12 at 17:14
    
I'm not sure what compiler DevCpp uses, and unfortunately, I don't have time to investigate it right now. Try to get a modern compiler. I know for sure that both Visual C++ 2010 and MinGW support the code above out of the box. Try to get one of those. I'll be back later to check up. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 2 '12 at 17:26

If your compiler supports RTTI, you can do something like:

const type_info *inheritedTypesOfStruct[3] = {
    &typeid(A), &typeid(B), &typeid(C)
};

However, you won't be able to instantiate a class using only its type_info. The factory pattern might be a better answer to your root problem.

Update: Since type_info instances cannot be copied (their copy constructor and assignment operator are private), and arrays of references are illegal, constant pointers have to be used in the example above.

share|improve this answer

I don't get the question. Are you asking for an array that can hold different type of instances at the same time? That is possible using polymorphism, of course. Or are you trying to get an array of types (like reflection)? That would be possible using RTTI or Qt type information (as an example), but I never did that.

share|improve this answer
    
Requests for clarification go as comments, not as answers. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 2 '12 at 16:22

You can take a look here: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Cpp/Class/Objectarraypolymorphism.htm

on how to use Polymorphism in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Question isn't about polymorphism, and links aren't answers –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 2 '12 at 16:02

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