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Suppose we have two structs:

typedef struct Struct1
{
    short a_short;
    int id;
} Struct1;

typedef struct Struct2
{
    short a_short;
    int id;
    short another_short;
} Struct2;

Is it safe to cast from Struct2 * to Struct1 * ? What does the ANSI spec says about this? I know that some compilers have the option to reorder structs fields to optimize memory usage, which might render the two structs incompatible. Is there any way to be sure this code will be valid, regardless of the compiler flag?

Thank you!

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2  
Reordering the members is not allowed by the standard AFAIK. I believe inserting different amounts of padding would be allowed though. –  delnan Jan 2 '12 at 15:53
    
@delnan Oh so then that struct 'packing' will only disable alignment? Thanks, I didn't know that! –  Waneck Jan 2 '12 at 16:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

struct pointers types always have the same representation in C.

(C99, 6.2.5p27) "All pointers to structure types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other."

And members in structure types are always in order in C.

(C99, 6.7.2.1p5) "a structure is a type consisting of a sequence of members, whose storage is allocated in an ordered sequence"

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This does not answer the question; even with these constraints it could still be an aliasing violation. However, under certain conditions, the C standard does explicitly allow what OP wants. –  R.. Jan 2 '12 at 15:57
    
Thank you very much for these quotes from the ANSI spec. This for me makes it clear that this is safe! –  Waneck Jan 2 '12 at 15:58
    
@R. What conditions? –  Waneck Jan 2 '12 at 15:59
    
@R.. This is a good point. If the casted pointer is dereferenced, this can still violate C aliasing rules. If the implementation take advantage of strict aliasing rules, this could be considered unsafe. –  ouah Jan 2 '12 at 16:50

It is safe, as far as I know.

But it's far better, if possible, to do:

typedef struct {
    Struct1 struct1;
    short another_short;
} Struct2;

Then you've even told the compiler that Struct2 starts with an instance of Struct1, and since a pointer to a struct always points at its first member, you're safe to treat a Struct2 * as a Struct1 *.

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well, if there is the slightest chance that one day offsetof( Struct1.a_short ) will be found to NOT be equal to offsetof( Struct2.a_short ) then there is an equal amount of chance that one day offsetof( Struct2.struct1 ) will be found not equal to zero. (Which would mean that &struct2 != (Struct2*)&struct2.struct1). –  Mike Nakis Jan 2 '12 at 15:56
    
Indeed, this way is much better! :) Thank you! –  Waneck Jan 2 '12 at 15:56

It will most probably work. But you are very correct in asking how you can be sure this code will be valid. So: somewhere in your program (at startup maybe) embed a bunch of ASSERT statements which make sure that offsetof( Struct1.a_short ) is equal to offsetof( Struct2.a_short ) etc. Besides, some programmer other than you might one day modify one of these structures but not the other, so better safe than sorry.

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Using static asserts would be much better... –  R.. Jan 2 '12 at 15:58
    
Thanks Mike, I'll for sure add some asserts to ensure this! –  Waneck Jan 2 '12 at 16:03
    
@R.. static asserts? I did not know they existed. I looked it up and found out. You are right, thanks. –  Mike Nakis Jan 2 '12 at 16:10
    
#define static_assert(p) struct{char dummy[2*!!(p)-1];} –  R.. Jan 2 '12 at 16:13

Yes, it is ok to do that!

A sample program is as follows.

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct Struct1
{
    short a_short;
    int id; 
} Struct1;

typedef struct Struct2
{
    short a_short;
    int id; 
    short another_short;
} Struct2;

int main(void) 
{

    Struct2 s2 = {1, 2, 3}; 
    Struct1 *ptr = &s2;
    void *vp = &s2;
    Struct1 *s1ptr = (Struct1 *)vp;

    printf("%d, %d \n", ptr->a_short, ptr->id);
    printf("%d, %d \n", s1ptr->a_short, s1ptr->id);

    return 0;
}
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