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I've used stackoverflow.com as a source of inspiration and problem-solving for many months now. I've just never run into a problem without a solution so far, which is the reason why I'd first like to introduce myself hereby, and to share my problem with everyone who's interested.

For the past couple of weeks I've tried animating certain shapes and lines on a canvas element, in order to create some interesting effects - such as handwriting or similar.
In order to achieve this, I use some technique which utilizes the .clip() command of the canvas element, to hide and gradually reveal areas under which a pre-rendered image (forms, lines...) "waits". The problem I run into here, has to do with the variables which determine the clipping area in the canvas element. It seems to have some strange problem with increasing (but not decreasing) the values in the animation.
And since all this sounds very weird, which I am aware of, here is the relevant part of the code I am talking about.

$(document).ready(function() {
    var ctx = $( "#canvas" )[0].getContext("2d");
    ctx.fillStyle = "#a00";
    var recW = 200;

    function animate() {
        ctx.clearRect(0,0,400,400);

        ctx.beginPath();
        ctx.rect(50,50,recW,100);
        ctx.clip();

        ctx.beginPath();
        ctx.arc(250,100,90,0,Math.PI*2,true);
        ctx.fill();

        recW--;

        if (recW == 150) clearInterval(run);
    }
    var run = setInterval(function() { animate(); },60);
});

The above code works perfectly fine. It draws a rectangle in a 400*400 canvas, uses it as a clipping region, draws the circle afterwards, and this circle is then clipped accordingly. Through the animation Interval, the length of the clipping-rectangle is then decreased to a test-value of 150. So far, so good. But here comes the part which has kept me riddled for hours on end:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var ctx = $( "#canvas" )[0].getContext("2d");
    ctx.fillStyle = "#a00";
    var recW = 150;

    function animate() {
        ctx.clearRect(0,0,400,400);

        ctx.beginPath();
        ctx.rect(50,50,recW,100);
        ctx.clip();

        ctx.beginPath();
        ctx.arc(250,100,90,0,Math.PI*2,true);
        ctx.fill();

        recW++;

        if (recW == 200) clearInterval(run);
    }
    var run = setInterval(function() { animate(); },60);
});

If I turn the whole animation around, begin with a width of 150 for the clipping rectangle, and increase it with recW++ up to the test-value of 200, suddenly the animation does no longer work. The gradual increase of the variable works without problems, but the visible clipping area does not grow.

I suspect that I am perhaps just overlooking the obvious here, but I simply cannot seem to find the error and I'd be very thankful if somebody could point me into the right direction ;)

Thanks a lot
Tricon

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1  
A great place to start would be to publish your full code online. Go to jsfiddle and put the code so that we can better run it and play around with it –  puk Jan 3 '12 at 7:09
    
It goes without saying that once you put it there, give us a link to your snippet of code =) –  puk Jan 3 '12 at 7:10
    
see below for solution. Also, when responding to comments, put an ampersand @ then the users name. In this case, the very first line of your response should have been @puk. The exception to this is when you are responding to the actual person who made the question/answer, then you don't need to do this –  puk Jan 3 '12 at 8:20
    
@puk Of course, why haven't I thought of that in the first place ;) Here would be the entire code - the HTML and CSS part are pretty dull, as this is a mere experiment for a larger project. (jsfiddle.net/tricon/TdVKe/4) Thanks already for looking into this ;) –  tricon Jan 3 '12 at 8:29

2 Answers 2

Your problem is a tricky one to debug unless you have a lot of experience (which I didn't either).

The reason you can animate the shape getting smaller and not it getting larger is because, I suspect, you are ANDing the clips together. Therefore, as they get smaller, everything looks fine since you are expecting the smallest clip area. When the clip is getting larger, however, you are ANDing with the original small clip area, so it appears like there is no animation.

To fix this you need to place a restore() call at the end of your clip. However, for this to work, you also need a save() call at the beginning of your clip. Finally, I added a bordering box to indicate where the clip is exactly, and since this is a fill and a stroke, I placed another beginPath statement to not stroke the circle outside of the clip area (which we just restored from).

Here is the full jsFiddle code

var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');

ctx.fillStyle = "#a00";
var recW = 150;

function animate2() {
    ctx.clearRect(50,50,canvas.width,recW - 1);

    ctx.save();

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.rect(50, 50, recW, recW);
    ctx.clip();

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(250,100,90,0,Math.PI*2,true);
    ctx.fill();

    ctx.restore();
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.rect(50 - 1, 50 - 1, recW + 2, recW + 2);
    ctx.lineWidth = 10;
    ctx.stroke();
    console.log(recW);
    recW++;

    if (recW == 300) clearInterval(run);
}
var run = setInterval(function() { animate2(); },5);
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Thanks a ton for the quick reply. I am currently checking up the code, the save() and restore() commands, as I have not actively used those before ;) –  tricon Jan 3 '12 at 8:45
    
@tricon I have written 50,000+ lines of code in Canvas and I still have to google even the simplest of things (ie. is it ctx.lineWidth or ctx.linewidth or ctx.lw...) –  puk Jan 3 '12 at 8:51
    
@tricon in addition to the clip, the globalCompositeOperation is really cool too. See here –  puk Jan 3 '12 at 8:52
    
I believe I've got it. The documentations I've read (well, most of them anyway) did not explain, that the clipping operation is saved in the stack of drawing states (which I personally find slightly...irritating ;)). That explains why the increase of a clipping area is not properly translated by an animation, since the a growing clipping area is always limited by it's smallest part (did that make sense? ^^). As a result, saving the completely empty canvas (i.e. no clipping operation yet), and restoring it before drawing the next frame is the only solution - I hope I got it right ;D –  tricon Jan 3 '12 at 9:04
    
@tricon yes, that is what I meant by ANDing. I suppose it has to do with the fact that the clip and beginPath and a whole host of other operations are designed such that they can be combined together. It's debatable whether it's a good idea to combine clips, I can't think of a situation where it would be better to do 2 clips, but perhaps some complex clips can't be done with paths alone. –  puk Jan 3 '12 at 9:07

Here is a nice guide on how to animate a clipping path. Your problem is that once the clip is made, you have to take it away in order to grow it, so you use save states and canvas wipes to make this effect.

Here is some example code.

<canvas  id="slide29Canvas2" width="970px" height="600px"></canvas>

<script>
    // Grabs the canvas element we made above
var ca1=document.getElementById("slide29Canvas1");

// Defines the 2d thing, standard for making a canvas
var c1=ca1.getContext("2d");

// Creates an image variable to hold and preload our image (can't do animations on an image unless its fully loaded)
var img1 = document.createElement('IMG');

// Loads image link into the img element we created above
img1.src = "http://tajvirani.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/slide29-bg_1.png";

// Creates the first save event, this gives us a base to clear our clipping / mask to since you can't just delete elements.
c1.save();

// Our function for when the image loads
img1.onload = function () {

    // First call to our canvas drawing function, the thing that is going to do all the work for us.
        // You can just call the function but I did it through a timer
    setTimeout(function() { drawc1r(0); },5);

        // The function that is doing all the heavy lifting. The reason we are doing a function is because
        // to make an animation we have to draw the circle (or element) frame by frame, to do this manually would be to time
        // intensive so we are just going to create a loop to do it. 'i' stands for the radius of our border
        // so over time our radius is going to get bigger and bigger.
    function drawc1r(i) {

        // Creates a save state. Imagine a save state like an array, when you clear one it pops last element in the array off the stack
        // When you save, it creates an element at the top of the stack. So if we cleared without making new ones, we would end up with nothing on our stage.
    c1.save();

        // This clears everything off the stage, I do this because our image has transparency, and restore() (the thing that pops one off the stack)
        // Doesn't clear off images, and so if we stick an image on the stage over and over, the transparency will stack on top of each other and
        // That isn't quite what we want.
    c1.clearRect(0, 0, ca1.width, ca1.height);

        // Adds one to the radius making the circle a little bigger with every step
    i++;

        // Tells canvas we are going to start creating an item on the stage - it can be a line, a rectangle or any shape you draw, but whatever
        // after this path will be added to the clip when its called. I can have 3 rectangles drawn and that would make a clip.
    c1.beginPath();

        // Can't make a true circle, so we make an arced line that happens to trace a circle - 'i' is used to define our radius.
    c1.arc(853, 320, i, 0, 2 * Math.PI, false);

        // After everything is defined, we make a clip area out of it.
    c1.clip();

        // Now that we have the clip added to it, we are going to add the image to the clip area.
    c1.drawImage(img1, 0, 0);

        // This pops one off the stack which gets rid of the clip so we can enlarge it and make it again on the next pass
    c1.restore();

        // Here is the final size of the circle, I want it to grow the circle until it hits 800 so we set a timeout to run this function again
        // until we get the size we want. The time in milliseconds pretty much defines your framerate for growing the circle. There are other
        // methods for doing this that give you better frame rates, but I didn't have much luck with them so I'm not going to include them.
    if(i < 800) {
        setTimeout(function() { drawc1r(i); },5);
    }

}

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