Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking to fetch a value after a match in a string. Lets say I have two string:

string1="Name: John Doe Age: 28 City: Oklahoma City"
string2="Name: Jane Age: 29 Years City: Boston"

Now I want to set three parameters: Name, Age and City. If I were to do:

name=$(echo "$string1" | awk '{ print $2 $3 }')
city=$(echo "$string1" | awk '{ print $5 }')
city=$(echo "$string1" | awk '{ print $8 $9 }

It would work for string1, but obviously not for string2. After some googling I believe I should put it in some kind of array, but I do not really know how to proceed.

Basically, I want everything after Name: and before Age: to be parameter $name. Everything between Age: and City: to be $age, and so on.

Best regards

share|improve this question
    
Please don't sign your posts. See stackoverflow.com/faq#signatures –  Amy Jan 3 '12 at 17:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Needs bash version 3 or higher:

if [[ $string1 =~ ^Name:\ (.*)\ Age:\ (.*)\ City:\ (.*) ]] ; then
    name=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
    age=${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
    city=${BASH_REMATCH[3]}
fi

You might need Age:\ ([0-9]*).*\ City: if you do not want "Years" to be included in $years.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice but it will return age="29 Years" instead of age="29" –  anubhava Jan 2 '12 at 19:15
    
@anubhava: updated. –  choroba Jan 2 '12 at 19:16
    
@choroba you should revert the change, that is expected behavior according to the OP. –  SiegeX Jan 2 '12 at 19:25
    
@choroba: Awesome. Works just as I expected. Thank you! –  Fredrik Jan 2 '12 at 23:27

awk is the best solution for this because you can set the field separator to a regex and then your fields are $2, $3 and $4

name=$(awk -F'[[:alpha:]]+: ' '{print $2}' <<<"$string1")
 age=$(awk -F'[[:alpha:]]+: ' '{print $3}' <<<"$string1")
city=$(awk -F'[[:alpha:]]+: ' '{print $4}' <<<"$string1")
share|improve this answer
    
Nice but it will return age="29 Years" instead of age="29" –  anubhava Jan 2 '12 at 19:14
    
@anubhava according to the OP, that is correct behavior. "Everything between Age: and City: to be $age" –  SiegeX Jan 2 '12 at 19:24
    
@SiegeX: Thank you for your suggestion. I really appreciate it. –  Fredrik Jan 2 '12 at 23:35
    
@Fredrik no problem, welcome to SO –  SiegeX Jan 3 '12 at 4:02

Perl solution (taken partly from my answer here):

Capture name:

name=`perl -ne 'print $1 if /Name: ([a-zA-Z ]+) Age:/' <<< $string`

Capture age:

age=`perl -ne 'print $1 if /Age: ([0-9a-zA-Z ]+) City:/' <<< $string`

-ne tells perl to loop the specified one-liner over the input file or standard input without printing anything by default (you could call it awk emulation mode).

The parens in the regexes specify the bits you're interested in capturing. The other fragments acts as delimiters.

After running both of these through $string1 of your example I get 'John Doe' and '28'.

Edit: replaced echo $string with <<< $string, which is nice.

share|improve this answer
    
Same problem, it will also return age="29 Years" instead of age="29" –  anubhava Jan 2 '12 at 19:16
    
See the other comments, I also think that's right according to the OP. –  Eduardo Ivanec Jan 2 '12 at 19:26
    
Thank you @EduardoIvanec for your assistance. –  Fredrik Jan 2 '12 at 23:35

Something like this might work:

string1="Name: John Doe Age: 28 City: Oklahoma City"
string1ByRow=$(echo "$string1" | perl -pe 's/(\w+:)/\n$1\n/g' | sed '/^$/d' | sed 's/^ *//')
string1Keys=$(echo "$string1ByRow" | grep ':$' | sed 's/:$//')
string1Vals=$(echo "$string1ByRow" | grep -v ':$')

echo "$string1Keys"
Name
Age
City

echo "$string1Vals"
John Doe 
28 
Oklahoma City
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. –  Fredrik Jan 2 '12 at 23:37

Consider these commands:

name=$(awk -F": |Age" '{print $2}' <<< $string1)
age=$(awk -F": |City|Years" '{print $3}' <<< $string1)
city=$(awk -F"City: " '{print $2}' <<< $string1)
share|improve this answer
    
This will return age="29" instead of age="29 Years" ;P –  SiegeX Jan 2 '12 at 19:25
    
That's intentional, age="29 years" in one case and age="28" in another doesn't make a lot of sense. You can't do any comparison with $age variable then. –  anubhava Jan 2 '12 at 19:29
    
It may be intentional, but it's not correct according to the specification given. Nowhere does he say he wants to do a numeric comparison on $age. He, however, did say Everything between Age: and City: to be $age –  SiegeX Jan 2 '12 at 19:31
    
I would leave it to OP to pick & choose the best behavior. If I am coding it I would never grab " years" in my $age variable. If at all I need to print "29 years" I will append it myself later. –  anubhava Jan 2 '12 at 19:36
    
@anubhava: Thank you for your effort. I appreciate it. I actually intended to keep it all, but again. Thank you for your effort. –  Fredrik Jan 2 '12 at 23:33

You can use three perl one-liners for assigning value to your variables -

name=$(perl -pe 's/.*(?<=Name: )([A-Za-z ]+)(?=Age).*/\1/' file)

age=$(perl -pe 's/.*(?<=Age: )([A-Za-z0-9 ]+)(?=City).*/\1/' file)

OR

age=$(perl -pe 's/.*(?<=Age: )([0-9 ]+)(?=Years|City).*/\1/' file)

city=$(perl -pe 's/.*(?<=City: )([A-Za-z ]+)"/\1/' file)

Test File:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
string1="Name: John Doe Age: 28 City: Oklahoma City"
string2="Name: Jane Age: 29 Years City: Boston"

Name:

[jaypal:~/Temp] perl -pe 's/.*(?<=Name: )([A-Za-z ]+)(?=Age).*/\1/' file
John Doe 
Jane 

Age:

[jaypal:~/Temp] perl -pe 's/.*(?<=Age: )([A-Za-z0-9 ]+)(?=City).*/\1/' file
28 
29 Years 

OR
if you just want the age and not years then

[jaypal:~/Temp] perl -pe 's/.*(?<=Age: )([0-9 ]+)(?=Years|City).*/\1/' file
28 
29 

City:

[jaypal:~/Temp] perl -pe 's/.*(?<=City: )([A-Za-z ]+)"/\1/' file
Oklahoma City
Boston
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @Jaypal –  Fredrik Jan 2 '12 at 23:38
    
You're welcome :) –  jaypal singh Jan 3 '12 at 0:33

I propose a generic solution:

keys=() values=()
for word in $string; do
    wlen=${#word}
    if [[ ${word:wlen-1:wlen} = : ]]; then
        keys+=("${word:0:wlen-1}") values+=("")
    else
        alen=${#values[@]}
        values[alen-1]=${values[alen-1]:+${values[alen-1]} }$word
    fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your effort. –  Fredrik Jan 2 '12 at 23:36

bash-3.2$ cat sample.log

string1="Name: John Doe Age: 28 City: Oklahoma City"
string2="Name: Jane Age: 29 Years City: Boston"

Using awk match inbuilt function:

awk ' { match($0,/Name:([A-Za-z ]*)Age:/,a); match($0,/Age:([ 0-9]*)/,b);  match($0,/City:([A-Za-z ]*)/,c); print a[1]":" b[1]":"c[1] } ' sample.log

Output:

 John Doe : 28 : Oklahoma City
 Jane : 29 : Boston
share|improve this answer
    
You can also use awk inbuilt FS parameter and do this way as well. bash-3.2$ awk 'BEGIN {FS="Name:|Age:|Years|Years.*City:|City:"; } { if(NF >=4) { name=$2; age=$3; city=$4; print name":"age":"city; } }' sample.log Output ` John Doe : 28 : Oklahoma City" Jane : 29 : Boston"` –  user982733 Jan 3 '12 at 22:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.