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Why would the following queries return different result sets?

select count(ml.link_type),mc.conv_string
from MSP_CONVERSIONS mc,MSP_LINKS ml
where ml.PROJ_ID = 4
and mc.STRING_TYPE_ID = 3
and mc.CONV_VALUE *= ml.link_type
group by mc.conv_string

select count(ml.link_type),mc.conv_string
from MSP_CONVERSIONS mc left outer join MSP_LINKS ml on mc.CONV_VALUE = ml.LINK_TYPE
where ml.PROJ_ID = 4
and mc.STRING_TYPE_ID = 3
group by mc.conv_string

The first query returns:

3 FF

10790 FS

0 SF

117 SS

The second query returns:

3 FF

10790 FS

117 SS

Both queries are run against a SQL Server 2008 Standard database. I cannot understand why two different result sets get returned? I thought that *= was shorthand syntax for LEFT OUTER JOIN. I have been looking at this for so long, maybe I missed something small?

Thanks...

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2 Answers 2

Because your first query is really equivalent to this:

select count(ml.link_type),mc.conv_string
from MSP_CONVERSIONS mc
LEFT JOIN MSP_LINKS ml
    ON ml.PROJ_ID = 4
    and mc.STRING_TYPE_ID = 3
    and mc.CONV_VALUE = ml.link_type
group by mc.conv_string

You've pulled all the conditions up into the join, making it impossible to ever completely filter out any rows from the MSP_CONVERSIONS table. Best to always stick with the full 'LEFT/INNER JOIN' syntax and avoid the confusion.

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Thanks for the answer however the query example you provided returns EVERY mc.conv_string. This query returns things as I needed: select count(ml.link_type),mc.conv_string from MSP_CONVERSIONS mc LEFT OUTER JOIN MSP_LINKS ml ON mc.CONV_VALUE = ml.link_type and ml.PROJ_ID = 4 where mc.STRING_TYPE_ID = 3 group by mc.conv_string Thanks for your help. –  Eric R May 18 '09 at 20:01

"*=" isn't so much "shorthand" syntax as old-fashion pre-ANSI OUTER JOIN syntax. Don't use it. Also, in general, if you have "a LEFT OUTER JOIN b ..." in your selection, then adding additional criteria on "b" in the WHERE clause is a bad idea- if it's read as filtering to be applied to the result of the join, then it will discard all rows where there was no match in b--- effectively converting your outer join to an inner join.

This ties into what Joel wrote--- having all the conditions in the "ON" clause means that the filtering is applied at the time of joining, and that's a different result. The ANSI syntax is more explicit.

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+1 - ANSI-89 syntax is evil. SQL Server actually handles ANSI-92 (explicit join) syntax more performantly in a number of situations, so you're best to stick with explicit joins. –  Aaron Alton May 17 '09 at 2:37
    
This should also not be used becasue it can be misinterpreted and the correct results cannot be guarneteed even as far back as SQL Server 2000. This is just plain bad code. It also is deprecated. –  HLGEM Jun 3 '11 at 20:04

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