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Can I write nested classes in Javascript?

function A()
{
    this.a;
    this.B = function()
    {
      this.ab ;
      this.C  = function()
      {
         this.ab = 0;
      }
    }
}

If the above code is correct,then

1.How do I declare an object of type B
2.Whose property is  ab.A() 's  or B() 's?.
3.Inside B() where does the 'this' points to.To A() Or to B()?
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1  
JavaScript does not have classes, only objects and functions. –  Incognito Jan 2 '12 at 21:24
    
Take a look on my edit :) –  abuduba Jan 2 '12 at 23:05
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Abstract:

Calling to function without using new operator means that this will be refer to object in which that function was created. For global variables this object is window object. Calling using new - function behave as constructor like in classes and this refers to this instance which will been created

1.How do I declare an object of type B

First way( as a curiosity ) - by calling to A without using new operator this will be refer to windowobject and B method and all other what was declared with this leaks to global scope because A == window.A => true

A(); 
var b = new B; // means => new window.B  //parentheses can be ommited if you invoking without arguments  
alert( ab )  // alerts 'inside A'  -> value from code presented below

or from instance of A:

new new A().B  // means => new ( new A ).B  

Be careful.

2.Whose property is ab.A() 's or B() 's?.

As above, it depends of how we'll accessing to it:

 function A()
    {
        this.ab = "inside A";
        this.B = function()
        {
          this.ab = "inside B";
          this.c  = function()
          {  
             this.ab = "inside C";
          }
        }
    };

Check this out

var a = new A;
a.ab // "inside A"
a.B(); // in B now 'this' refers to 'a', 'a.ab' will be replaced to 'ab' from inside 'B'
a.ab // "inside B"

but

var a = new A;
a.ab // "inside A"
var b = new a.B;
a.ab // "inside A"
b.ab // "inside B"

// and now
b.c() 
b.ab // "inside C" and so on:)  

3.Inside B() where does the 'this' points to.To A() Or to B()?

As above:)

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In your example, the "classes" will be instance-specific. Are you sure you want that? You might be looking for something more along the lines of:

function A() {
    // ...
}

A.B = function() {
    // ...
};

var one = new A();
var two = new A.B();

Although the "nested" classes won't be able to access "private members" because JavaScript doesn't have those in the first place.


As for your example:

  1. You would create an instance of A, say new A(), and access B, say new new A().B()1, or replacing new A() with a variable.
  2. Neither, it's an empty statement for now... but it would be a property of the B instance.
  3. To an instance of B (unless Function.call or Function.apply is used).

1 Yes, it works!

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It's very unorthodox, but there's nothing stopping you from nesting constructor functions in JavaScript.

From your example, you can access the B function from an instance of A:

var someA = new A();
var someB = new someA.B();

To answer your other question:

 this.B = function() {
      this.ab = 0;
      this.c  = function() {
         this.ab++;
      }
    }

What this refers to inside of B depends on how B is invoked. If you call B as a constructor, with the new keyword, this will be a new object inheriting from B's prototype.

If you call B without new, it will be treated as a method, and this will be the instance of A on which the method was called.

And so on with C. If C is called with new, this inside of C will be a new object inheriting from C's prototype. Or C can be a method of B, which makes a lot more sense. Is something like this what you're wanting:

function A() {
    this.a;
    this.B = function() {
         this.ab = 0;
         this.c  = function() {
             this.ab++;
         }
    }
}

var someA = new A();
var someB = new someA.B();

console.log(someB.ab); //0
someB.c();
console.log(someB.ab); //1

DEMO


Finally, note that, though nesting constructors like this isn't too common, there's nothing stopping you from adding to B's prototype just like you would any other constructor

function A() {
    this.a;
    this.B = function() {
      this.ab = 0;
      this.c  = function() {
         this.ab++;
      }
    }
    this.B.prototype.foo = function() { alert("Bar " + this.ab) };
}

var someA = new A();
var someB = new someA.B();

console.log(someB.ab);
someB.c();
console.log(someB.ab);
someB.foo();   //Bar 1

Updated Demo

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Which object is referred by 'this' inside B().Object of A or objet of B? –  Jinu Joseph Daniel Jan 2 '12 at 20:47
    
Can i use 'this' like <pre> function A() { this.a; this.B = function() { this.ab ; this.C = function() { this.ab = 0;//this refers to B this.a =1;//this refers to A } } } –  Jinu Joseph Daniel Jan 2 '12 at 20:57
    
@JinuJD - see my edit - hopefully that helps –  Adam Rackis Jan 2 '12 at 21:00
    
Understood..Thanks Adam Rackis –  Jinu Joseph Daniel Jan 2 '12 at 21:06
1  
@JinuJD - sure thing. For completeness I added one more edit –  Adam Rackis Jan 2 '12 at 21:10
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