Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It's a badly worded title but I can't come up with anything better, sorry!

We have a table which effectively looks like this (trimmed for brevity):

create table Appointment (
    AppointmentId       int     not null identity(1, 1),
    CustomerId          int     not null,
    AppointmentDate     date    not null,

    constraint PK_Appointment primary key (AppointmentId),
    constraint FK_Appointment_Customer foreign key (CustomerId) references Customer(CustomerId)
)

We're trying to write a query which finds details of all customers who have had their SECOND appointment within a given date range. Note that customers could potentially have had two appointments on the same date.

We can do this using a few CTEs, but I'm sure there's a better way (probably using some sort of row_number type function?). Any suggestions? The thing I really dislike about our solution is that it's completely inflexible (what happens when they want to see the THIRD appointment within the given date range, etc).

Anyway; here's what we came up with:

declare @startDate date = '2011-12-01'
declare @endDate date = '2011-12-31'
;
-- Limit to appointments before the end date
with AppointmentDates as (
    select
        AppointmentId,
        CustomerId,
        AppointmentDate
    from
        Appointment
    where
        AppointmentDate < @endDate
),

-- Get first appointment date - careful to cater for customers who have had
-- two appointments on the same day
FirstAppointments as (
    select
        CustomerId,
        Min(AppointmentId) AppointmentId,
        Min(AppointmentDate) AppointmentDate
    from
        AppointmentDates
    group by
        CustomerId
),

-- Second appointment date
SecondAppointments as (
    select
        AppointmentDates.CustomerId,
        Min(AppointmentDates.AppointmentId) AppointmentId,
        Min(AppointmentDates.AppointmentDate) AppointmentDate
    from
        AppointmentDates
        inner join FirstAppointments on AppointmentDates.CustomerId = FirstAppointments.CustomerId
    where
        AppointmentDates.AppointmentId > FirstAppointments.AppointmentId
    group by 
        AppointmentDates.CustomerId
    having
        Min(AppointmentDates.AppointmentDate) > @startDate
)

-- Bulk of query goes here; trimmed for brevity
select * from SecondAppointments
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, using ROW_NUMBER() you would be able to solve this problem much easier:

;WITH ranked AS (
  SELECT
    CustomerId,
    AppointmentId,
    AppointmentDate,
    VisitNumber = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY CustomerId
                                         ORDER BY AppointmentDate)
  FROM AppointmentDates
)
SELECT
  CustomerId,
  AppointmentId,
  AppointmentDate
FROM ranked
WHERE VisitNumber     =  @visitNumber
  AND AppointmentDate >= @startDate
  AND AppointmentDate <  @endDate
share|improve this answer
    
That's the one I was after, thanks! –  gerrod Jan 3 '12 at 0:51

Nested uses of TOP should this. Note that the sort order on the inner loop is descending. So that the outer loop gets the first entry in descending order. This should work for finding any nth position.

SELECT TOP 1 * 
FROM (
    SELECT TOP 2 * 
    FROM employee
    GROUP BY CustomerID
    ORDER BY AppointmentDate ASC) a
GROUP BY CustomerID
ORDER BY AppointmentDate DESC

Please note that I have NOT tested this SQL.

Fixed to reflect second appt, not second most recent appt.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought that second highest meant second maximum too, but based on the OP's script it's more likely second minimum date. –  Andriy M Jan 3 '12 at 0:37
    
Yep, that was a typo by me, sorry. Have updated the question to reflect this. –  gerrod Jan 3 '12 at 0:50
1  
easily fixed, just swap ASC and DESC on the ORDER BY clause. –  Gerald P. Wright Jan 3 '12 at 0:53
    
Either way, this script won't work because TOP is not an aggregate function (unless there's a way to make it so). So effectively the result set will be 1 row, no matter how many customers there are. –  gerrod Jan 3 '12 at 3:17
    
Sorry about that, writing the SQL in my head... gotta get SQL Server back on my home machine after HDD wipe. –  Gerald P. Wright Jan 3 '12 at 3:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.