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I have a text file:

<table style="background-color: #f3f3f3; font-family: Arial; font-size: 8pt; border-top: #e7e7e7 5px solid" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
  <tbody>
<tr>
<td style="padding-bottom: 20px; padding-left: 20px; padding-right: 20px; padding-top: 20px">
<p style="color: #b0b0b0"><font color="#808080" size="1"><strong>Important information</strong>: on this communication as it does not purport to be comprehensive. This disclaimer does not purport to exclude any warranties implied by law which may not be lawfully excluded. We have taken precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail. We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software </p>

This is not a dump of the website, it's what the application puts into a file.

My method for checking the text file looks like this:

def check_email_exists(firstname, email_sub, search_string)
email_fldr="C:\\Agent\\TestMailFolder"
email_id="myname@gmail.com"
Dir.chdir("#{email_fldr}\\#{firstname}") do
  Dir.glob("#{email_id}*#{email_sub}*") do |filename|
    File.open(filename) do |file|
      file.readlines(filename).index("#{search_string}")
    end
   end
  end
end

This is not working.

I am passing values in my search_string which are strings. For example, I am trying to see if the string = "transmitting software" is in the file. Also I am checking if the file contains some random strings which are not there. In this case it should pass if it finds and matches the value in the file and fail if it can't.

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1 Answer 1

Your file contains HTML. For 90%+ applications involving HTML, you should use a parser. I recommend Nokogiri.

require 'nokogiri'

html = <<EOT
<table style="background-color: #f3f3f3; font-family: Arial; font-size: 8pt; border-top: #e7e7e7 5px solid" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
  <tbody>
<tr>
<td style="padding-bottom: 20px; padding-left: 20px; padding-right: 20px; padding-top: 20px">
<p style="color: #b0b0b0"><font color="#808080" size="1"><strong>Important information</strong>: on this communication as it does not purport to be comprehensive. This disclaimer does not purport to exclude any warranties implied by law which may not be lawfully excluded. We have taken precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail. We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software </p>
EOT

doc = Nokogiri::HTML::DocumentFragment.parse(html)

content = doc.content

puts content

Which outputs:

Important information: on this communication as it does not purport to be comprehensive. This disclaimer does not purport to exclude any warranties implied by law which may not be lawfully excluded. We have taken precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail. We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software 

If you want to see if the results contain the string "transmitting software" try this in addition:

puts "contains tranmitting software" if (content['transmitting software'])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response, I did get the idea of using nokogiri. –  user1126946 Jan 4 '12 at 1:11
    
I hadn't mentioned earlier that I am using cucumber to test these scenarios –  user1126946 Jan 4 '12 at 1:12

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