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In the following code, in the innermost loop, when d < p is true and p % d == 0 is false, is variable d being incremented or is incrementing being skipped?

// Program to generate a table of prime numbers

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    int p, d;
    _Bool isPrime;

    for ( p = 2; p <= 50; ++p ) {
        isPrime = 1;

        for ( d = 2; d < p; ++d )
            if ( p % d == 0 )
                isPrime = 0;

            if ( isPrime != 0 )
                printf ("%i  ", p);
    }
    printf ("\n");
    return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, AusCBloke, Cody Gray, outis, animuson Mar 31 '12 at 6:54

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2  
Did you try running this in the debugger? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 2 '12 at 23:56
    
Should if ( isPrime != 0 ) be part of the inner or outer for loop? By the looks of the indentation it should be part of the inner loop, but the lack of braces means it's not. It doesn't affect the answer to your question, but thought it's worth pointing out. –  AusCBloke Jan 2 '12 at 23:58
    
You should, if p % d == 0, break out of the inner loop, if you don't, you're just burning cycles pointlessly. for(d = 2; d < p; ++d){ if (p % d == 0) { isPrime = 0; break; } }. Also, if p is a composite number, its smallest prime divisor does not exceed sqrt(p), so the inner loop need only run to that limit. That would greatly speed up the computation for higher limits than 50. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 3 '12 at 0:25
    
possible duplicate of While loop help. This is why an auto-indenting editor is helpful, and why you should always use braces around blocks. –  outis Mar 28 '12 at 23:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When d < p is true then d is being incremented. That's the only condition that matters, not whether or not the modulus has a value.

Also not that it matters but why not declare d and p inside the loop

int p = 2; p <= 50; ++p

int d = 2; d < p; ++d 

Not that it matters much but it's nice to limit the scope of the variables if you aren't going to use them after the loop

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Step through it under the debugger :)

You can see from the code that "d" is being incremented ONLY in the "for" loop.

You will see under the debugger that the moment d >= p, then "++d" is NOT being executed.

PS: I reformatted your code to make the indentation reflect the actual logic:

int main (void)
{
    int p, d;
    _Bool isPrime;

    for ( p = 2; p <= 50; ++p ) {
        isPrime = 1;

        for ( d = 2; d < p; ++d )
            if ( p % d == 0 )
                isPrime = 0;

        if ( isPrime != 0 )
            printf ("%i  ", p);
    }
    printf ("\n");
    return 0;
}
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