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I am running a batch operation over all rows in a database. This involves selecting every single model and doing something to it. It makes sense to split this into chunks and do it chunk by chunk.

I'm currently using Paginator, because it's convenient. This means that I need an ordering on the values so that they can be paged through in order. This does generate SQL statements which have order and limit clauses, and for each chunk I think Postgres may be sorting the whole table (although I can't claim to have any knowledge about internals). All I know is that the database is at around 50% CPU and I think that's too high just to be doing selects.

What's the best way to iterate over the entire table in a RDMBS/CPU-friendly way?

Assuming that the contents of the database doesn't change during the batch operation.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From your description you don't actually care about the sort order of the rows you process. If you have primary keys in your tables (which I expect!), this crude method of partitioning would be much faster:

SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE id BETWEEN 0    AND 1000;
SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE id BETWEEN 1001 AND 2000;
...

This performs the same for any offset and (almost) the same for any size of table. Retrieve min and max of your primary key and partition accordingly:

SELECT min(id), max(id) from tbl; -- then divide in suitable chunks

As opposed to:

SELECT * FROM tbl ORDER BY id LIMIT 1000;
SELECT * FROM tbl ORDER BY id LIMIT 1000 OFFSET 1000;
...

This is generally slower because all rows have to be sorted and performance degrades additionally with higher offsets and bigger tables.

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This assumes that the records are returned in the same order without a sort clause. Is this correct? Also, if I have a default sorting in my Meta class can I somehow remove it for the query? –  Joe Jan 3 '12 at 12:41
    
@Joe: Basically you get the same records, but unsorted. If there are gaps in your ID-space, the number of records returned can be less than expected for every call. While with LIMIT / OFFSET you get a fixed number of sorted rows (except of the last call per table). I don't how to handle the Meta class, but you need to order your rows for LIMIT / OFFSET. –  Erwin Brandstetter Jan 3 '12 at 14:09
    
Erwin, I'm really sorry I didn't read your answer correctly. Are you sure this is faster? the between clause can surely only work if either the ids are already sorted, or it performs a whole table scan each time? –  Joe Jan 3 '12 at 15:27
    
@Joe: There is no natural order in a table. Of course, if the physical order of rows matches the index, this may speed up the operation as fewer blocks have to be read. You may be interested in CLUSTER And no, my query will result in an index scan, if id is indexed, but only if the chunk you read is a small portion of the table. The query planner decides which will be faster: index or seq scan. Just test with EXPLAIN ANALYZE and see for yourself. –  Erwin Brandstetter Jan 3 '12 at 15:39
    
Excellent, thank you! –  Joe Jan 3 '12 at 17:08

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