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I got the above error in my app. Here is the original code

public string GetCustomerNumber(Guid id)
{
     string accountNumber = 
          (string)DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(connectionStringSplendidmyApp, 
                          CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
                          "GetCustomerNumber", 
                          new SqlParameter("@id", id));
     return accountNumber.ToString();
 }

I replaced with

public string GetCustomerNumber(Guid id)
{
   object accountNumber =  
          (object)DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(connectionStringSplendidCRM, 
                                CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
                                "spx_GetCustomerNumber", 
                                new SqlParameter("@id", id));
    if (accountNumber is System.DBNull)
    {
       return string.Empty;
    }
    else
    {
       return accountNumber.ToString();
    }
}

Is there a better way around this?

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1  
you should really look into @rein's answer, will save you lots of time in the long run –  roman m Jun 19 '09 at 23:35
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7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted

A shorter form can be used:

return (accountNumber == DBNull.Value) ? string.Empty : accountNumber.ToString()

EDIT: Haven't paid attention to ExecuteScalar. It does really return null if the field is absent in the return result. So use instead:

return (accountNumber == null) ? string.Empty : accountNumber.ToString() 
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1  
That won't work - the "accountNumber" is not a database value but a regular old Plain Old .NET "object" instance - you need to check against normal "null" value. The DBNull.Value would work for a SqlDataReader or a SqlParameter - but not for this object here. –  marc_s May 15 '09 at 20:27
    
You're right, I started to optimize the condition check part, haven't looked at the line before. Mea culpa. –  User May 15 '09 at 20:28
    
Yep, now you're talking! :-) –  marc_s May 15 '09 at 20:29
    
There is typo in your post that I can't really edit because the edit requires 6 characters to be changed. Can someone change accountNumber.TosString() to accountNumber.ToString() –  Erik Kralj Jul 30 '13 at 11:31
    
@marc_s Depending on db/query layout, you need to check against either of them or even both. If the WHERE does not match any row, you'll get a null, if the selected row has NULL in that column, the return value is System.DBNull. –  Alexander May 27 at 7:52
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With a simple generic function you can make this very easy. Just do this:

return ConvertFromDBVal<string>(accountNumber);

using the function:

public static T ConvertFromDBVal<T>(object obj)
{
    if (obj == null || obj == DBNull.Value)
    {
        return default(T); // returns the default value for the type
    }
    else
    {
        return (T)obj;
    }
}
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Yes, a function like this is the only practical solution. Any kind of in-line logic will fail after you have copied and pasted it a thousand times. :-) –  Christian Hayter Jul 2 '09 at 15:49
    
this will not work if you try converting 1 to bool (Convert.ToBoolean(1) works fine tho) –  roman m Oct 17 '09 at 20:32
    
@roman: so then we would want to have an additional check (prior to checking for null) that checks for a boolean type... –  IAbstract Aug 27 '10 at 14:37
1  
awesome... +1 and bonus bounty for you. This should be the answer. –  IAbstract Aug 27 '10 at 14:42
3  
This is gold. So simple, yet so effective. +1 –  RPM1984 Oct 13 '11 at 1:25
show 3 more comments

ExecuteScalar will return

  • null if there is no result set
  • otherwise the first column of the first row of the resultset, which may be DBNull.

If you know that the first column of the resultset is a string, then to cover all bases you need to check for both null and DBNull. Something like:

object accountNumber = ...ExecuteScalar(...);
return (accountNumber == null) ? String.Empty : accountNumber.ToString();

The above code relies on the fact that DBNull.ToString returns an empty string.

If accountNumber was another type (say integer), then you'd need to be more explicit:

object accountNumber = ...ExecuteScalar(...);
return (accountNumber == null || Convert.IsDBNull(accountNumber) ?     
         (int) accountNumber : 0;

If you know for sure that your resultset will always have at least one row (e.g. SELECT COUNT(*)...), then you can skip the check for null.

In your case the error message "Unable to cast object of type ‘System.DBNull’ to type ‘System.String`" indicates that the first column of your result set is a DBNUll value. This is from the cast to string on the first line:

string accountNumber = (string) ... ExecuteScalar(...);

Marc_s's comment that you don't need to check for DBNull.Value is wrong.

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my resultset will not always return a row. –  Saif Khan May 15 '09 at 21:26
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There is another way to workaround this issue. How about modify your store procedure? by using ISNULL(your field, "") sql function , you can return empty string if the return value is null.

Then you have your clean code as original version.

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I suppose you can do it like this:

string accountNumber = DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(...) as string;

If accountNumber is null it means it was DBNull not string :)

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Or return (accountNumber as string) ?? string.Empty; , with accountNumber still being an object. If you prefer to keep your database call on its own line. –  Brian Aug 30 '10 at 18:10
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You can use C#'s null coalescing operator

return accountNumber ?? string.Empty;
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+1 You beat me to it. :( –  dss539 May 15 '09 at 20:38
    
-1: That won't compile: the method returns a string and accountNumber is an object. –  Joe May 15 '09 at 20:58
1  
return Cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString() ?? String.Empty; –  Chaitanya Jan 19 '10 at 6:34
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String.Concat transforms DBNull and null values to an empty string.

public string GetCustomerNumber(Guid id)
{
   object accountNumber =  
          (object)DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(connectionStringSplendidCRM, 
                                CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
                                "spx_GetCustomerNumber", 
                                new SqlParameter("@id", id));

    return String.Concat(accountNumber);

 }

However, I think you lose something on code understandability

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What happens if you write return "" + accountNumber;? –  Zev Spitz Jul 6 at 12:13
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