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I am trying to find the top occurrances of words in a string.

e.g.

Hello World This is a great world, This World is simply great

from the above string i am trying to calculate results something like follows:

  • world, 3
  • great, 2
  • hello, 1
  • this, 2

but ignoring any words with length less then 3 characters e.g. is which occurred twice.

I tried to look into Dictionary<key, value> pairs, I tried to look into linq's GroupBy extension. I know the solution lies somewhere in between but I just can't get my head around the algorithm and how to get this done.

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4  
Is this a homework? –  dasblinkenlight Jan 3 '12 at 2:12
    
This is similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/8630235/… –  Matthias Jan 3 '12 at 2:17
    
@dasblinkenlight - No this is not a homework, i am trying to extract meta keywords and save in the database for each record. –  Thr3e Jan 3 '12 at 5:22
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5 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Using LINQ and Regex

Regex.Split("Hello World This is a great world, This World is simply great".ToLower(), @"\W+")
    .Where(s => s.Length > 3)
    .GroupBy(s => s)
    .OrderByDescending(g => g.Count())
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2  
great answer, but i wouldnt recommend this solution, it would be better for him to understand the usage of dictionary rather than regex or linq. just saying. –  DarthVader Jan 3 '12 at 2:19
    
+1 Best answer as it takes into account punctuation... –  alexfreiria Jan 3 '12 at 2:32
    
@DarthVader I agree on mathematical level. From programming perspective knowing LINQ is just as valuable. –  Ilia G Jan 3 '12 at 3:53
    
Exactly what i was looking for. Thanks ... i am going to convert the result .ToList.Take(5) to get the top 5 words by density. Thank you for the help –  Thr3e Jan 3 '12 at 5:57
    
tell me how to print only the maximum repeating word –  Lijo Jul 8 at 7:49
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const string input = "Hello World This is a great world, This World is simply great";
var words = input
    .Split(new[] { ' ' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
    .Where(w => w.Length >= 3)
    .GroupBy(w => w)
    .OrderByDescending(g => g.Count());

foreach (var word in words)
    Console.WriteLine("{0}x {1}", g.Count(), word.Key);

// 2x World
// 2x This
// 2x great
// 1x Hello
// 1x world,
// 1x simply

Not perfect, because it doesn't trim the comma, but it shows you how to do the grouping and filtering at least.

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So I'd avoid LINQ and Regex and the like since it sounds like you are trying to find an algorithm and understand this not use some function to do it for you.

Not that those are not valid solutions. They are. Definitely.

Try something like this

Dictionary<string, int> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>();

string sInput = "Hello World, This is a great World. I love this great World";
sInput = sInput.Replace(",", ""); //Just cleaning up a bit
sInput = sInput.Replace(".", ""); //Just cleaning up a bit
string[] arr = sInput.Split(' '); //Create an array of words

foreach (string word in arr) //let's loop over the words
{
    if (word.Length >= 3) //if it meets our criteria of at least 3 letters
    {
        if (dictionary.ContainsKey(word)) //if it's in the dictionary
            dictionary[word] = dictionary[word] + 1; //Increment the count
        else
            dictionary[word] = 1; //put it in the dictionary with a count 1
     }
}

foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> pair in dictionary) //loop through the dictionary
    Response.Write(string.Format("Key: {0}, Pair: {1}<br />",pair.Key,pair.Value));
share|improve this answer
    
You can make string sInput = "Hello World, This is a great World. I love this great World"; string sInput = "Hello World, This is a great World. I love this great World".ToLower(); to make it case insensitive. Personally I like case sensitivity there as it can tell you proper nouns and the start of a sentence even without punctuation, so nothing is lost. On the downside World and world aren't equal. –  Jordan Jan 3 '12 at 2:49
    
+1 Nice teaching post. Would give another +1 for comments if I could. –  competent_tech Jan 3 '12 at 3:29
1  
Regarding your comment on casing, there is a much easier solution: create the dictionary using a case-insensitive comparer: var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase); –  competent_tech Jan 3 '12 at 3:31
    
@Competent_tech Ah I didn't know you could do that :) That's what I get for not looking at the overloads! –  Jordan Jan 3 '12 at 3:49
    
@Jordan .. thank you very much for the algorithm. Even i am using the function described above for my app, but you have helped me solve where i was stuck and also this will help me at several parts of my program. Great Answer –  Thr3e Jan 3 '12 at 6:06
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I write a string processor class.You can use it.

Example:

metaKeywords = bodyText.Process(blackListWords: prepositions).OrderByDescending().TakeTop().GetWords().AsString();

Class:

 public static class StringProcessor
{
    private static List<String> PrepositionList;

    public static string ToNormalString(this string strText)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(strText)) return String.Empty;
        char chNormalKaf = (char)1603;
        char chNormalYah = (char)1610;
        char chNonNormalKaf = (char)1705;
        char chNonNormalYah = (char)1740;
        string result = strText.Replace(chNonNormalKaf, chNormalKaf);
        result = result.Replace(chNonNormalYah, chNormalYah);
        return result;
    }

    public static List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> Process(this String bodyText,
        List<String> blackListWords = null,
        int minimumWordLength = 3,
        char splitor = ' ',
        bool perWordIsLowerCase = true)
    {
        string[] btArray = bodyText.ToNormalString().Split(splitor);
        long numberOfWords = btArray.LongLength;
        Dictionary<String, Int32> wordsDic = new Dictionary<String, Int32>(1);
        foreach (string word in btArray)
        {
            if (word != null)
            {
                string lowerWord = word;
                if (perWordIsLowerCase)
                    lowerWord = word.ToLower();
                var normalWord = lowerWord.Replace(".", "").Replace("(", "").Replace(")", "")
                    .Replace("?", "").Replace("!", "").Replace(",", "")
                    .Replace("<br>", "").Replace(":", "").Replace(";", "")
                    .Replace("،", "").Replace("-", "").Replace("\n", "").Trim();
                if ((normalWord.Length > minimumWordLength && !normalWord.IsMemberOfBlackListWords(blackListWords)))
                {
                    if (wordsDic.ContainsKey(normalWord))
                    {
                        var cnt = wordsDic[normalWord];
                        wordsDic[normalWord] = ++cnt;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        wordsDic.Add(normalWord, 1);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> keywords = wordsDic.ToList();
        return keywords;
    }

    public static List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> OrderByDescending(this List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> list, bool isBasedOnFrequency = true)
    {
        List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> result = null;
        if (isBasedOnFrequency)
            result = list.OrderByDescending(q => q.Value).ToList();
        else
            result = list.OrderByDescending(q => q.Key).ToList();
        return result;
    }

    public static List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> TakeTop(this List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> list, Int32 n = 10)
    {
        List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> result = list.Take(n).ToList();
        return result;
    }

    public static List<String> GetWords(this List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> list)
    {
        List<String> result = new List<String>();
        foreach (var item in list)
        {
            result.Add(item.Key);
        }
        return result;
    }

    public static List<Int32> GetFrequency(this List<KeyValuePair<String, Int32>> list)
    {
        List<Int32> result = new List<Int32>();
        foreach (var item in list)
        {
            result.Add(item.Value);
        }
        return result;
    }

    public static String AsString<T>(this List<T> list, string seprator = ", ")
    {
        String result = string.Empty;
        foreach (var item in list)
        {
            result += string.Format("{0}{1}", item, seprator);
        }
        return result;
    }

    private static bool IsMemberOfBlackListWords(this String word, List<String> blackListWords)
    {
        bool result = false;
        if (blackListWords == null) return false;
        foreach (var w in blackListWords)
        {
            if (w.ToNormalString().Equals(word))
            {
                result = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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string words = "Hello World This is a great world, This World is simply great".ToLower();

var results = words.Split(' ').Where(x => x.Length > 3)
                              .GroupBy(x => x)
                              .Select(x => new { Count = x.Count(), Word = x.Key })
                              .OrderByDescending(x => x.Count);

foreach (var item in results)
    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} occured {1} times", item.Word, item.Count));

Console.ReadLine();

To get the word with the most occurrences:

results.First().Word;

share|improve this answer
    
Instead of Word = x.First(), you can access the group key via Word = x.Key. –  Tatham Oddie Jan 3 '12 at 2:34
    
Thanks @TathamOddie didn't know that - btw, thanks for the FormsAuthenticationExtensions ;) –  alexfreiria Jan 3 '12 at 2:39
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