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OK, so I am doing an exercise in a book, converting different types of money to dollars. For some reason when I type in 'e' as input for a char variable and compare it to 'e' in an if statement the comparison doesnt work, however if I replace it with another letter it will work fine. What's the deal? Heres the code:

int main()
{
    const double yen_per_dollar = .013;
    const double pound_per_dollar = 1.55;
    const double euro_per_dollar = 1.29;

    double amount = 1;
    char unit = ' ';

    std::cout << "Please enter a amount followed by a unit (p, y, or e): ";
    std::cin >> amount >> unit;

    if (unit == 'y')
        std::cout << amount << " yen is $" << amount * yen_per_dollar << " dollars.\n";
    if (unit == 'p')
        if (amount == 1)
            std::cout << amount << " pound is $" << amount * pound_per_dollar << " dollars.\n";
        else
            std::cout << amount << " pounds is $" << amount * pound_per_dollar << " dollars.\n";
    if (unit == 'e')
        if (amount == 1)
            std::cout << amount << " euro is $" << amount * euro_per_dollar << " dollars.\n";
        else
            std::cout << amount << " euros is $" << amount * euro_per_dollar << " dollars.\n";
    else 
        std::cout << "Sorry, that input isn't in the correct format." << std::endl;
    std::cin >> amount; // Keeps window open
}
share|improve this question
8  
¤ Consider that e.g. 3.14e20 is a valid specification of a double value. Cheers & hth., – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 3 '12 at 3:51
    
Ahhh i thought it might have something to do with that, just remembering notation from grade school, didnt know doubles could be expressed like that. Thanks. – Fuddlebutts Jan 3 '12 at 3:52
1  
Please do not pause your programs artificially at the end with platform-dependent techniques like system("pause");. If the problem is that "the window just disappears", then run the program differently, such that the lifetime of the window is not tied to the lifetime of the program. Your program does not create the command window, and as such, is not logically responsible for keeping it around. – Karl Knechtel Jan 3 '12 at 4:02
1  
@KarlKnechtel: Well said! I think that should be extended to platform-independent techniques like std::cin.get(). OK to copy-paste your message to future offenders? – Potatoswatter Jan 3 '12 at 4:08
2  
@AntonGolov Sometimes we have to do these kinds of things for proper i18n/l10n, but then we should be using something more sophisticated to build our strings than in-order concatenation with operator<< etc. (i.e., some kind of positional formatting tool, such as boost::format). – Karl Knechtel Jan 3 '12 at 4:11

There are lots of comments but no solution. In fact, I couldn't come up with a good solution, either. The best I could think of is to install a custom num_get facet (this alone almost certainly rules the code out as being suitable for being handed in as a homework solution): this is somewhat advanced stuff and I don't think many people would ever think of this.

Other than this, I'd think that you want to data-drive the currencies, i.e. instead of having a code branch for each currency, you want to set up some sort of container describing all currencies (BTW, the plural of Euro is Euro). The resulting program would look something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <locale>
#include <string>
#include <tuple>
#include <map>
#include <ctype.h>

struct currency_get:
    std::num_get<char>
{
    iter_type do_get(iter_type it, iter_type end, std::ios_base&, std::ios_base::iostate& err, double& v) const
    {
        std::string input;
        for (; it != end && (*it == '.' || *it == '-' || *it == '+'
                             || isdigit(static_cast<unsigned char>(*it))); ++it)
        {
            input.push_back(*it);
        }
        errno = 0;
        if (input.empty())
        {
            err |= std::ios_base::failbit;
        }
        else
        {
            v = strtod(input.c_str(), 0);
        }

        return it;
    }
};

int main()
{
    typedef std::tuple<double, std::string, std::string> desc;
    std::map<char, desc> currencies;
    currencies['y'] = desc(0.013, "yen", "yen");
    currencies['p'] = desc(1.55, "pound", "pounds");
    currencies['e'] = desc(1.29, "euro", "euro");

    double amount(0);
    char   currency(' ');
    std::locale loc(std::locale(), new currency_get);
    std::cin.imbue(loc);

    if (std::cin >> amount >> currency)
    {
        std::map<char, desc>::const_iterator it(currencies.find(currency));
        if (it != currencies.end())
        {
            desc const& d(it->second);
            std::cout << amount << " " << (amount == 1? std::get<1>(d): std::get<2>(d)) << " is "
                      << (std::get<0>(d) * amount) << " dollar"
                      << (std::get<0>(d) * amount == 1? "": "s") << "\n";
        }
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "input failed\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I think the easiest solution is to require the user to type a space between the number and the currency specifier. :) – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 3 '12 at 5:25

Here are the suggestions for your program:

1. Use something like system("pause"); to pause the program or make change in project settings if you are using Visual Studio so that debug windows waits for you after execution.

2. For next if statements you should use else statement and surround by braces. Here's an example,

else if (unit == 'p') {
    if (amount == 1)
        std::cout << amount << " pound is $" << amount * pound_per_dollar << " dollars.\n";
    else
        std::cout << amount << " pounds is $" << amount * pound_per_dollar << " dollars.\n";
}

If you do it in this way your last else statement will give you correct result. Otherwise you'll always get "Sorry, that input isn't in the correct format" except for 'e'. Indeed, that's what happening in your program.

3. You should do add a return 0 statement for your int return type of main function.

4. Instead of typing std every time you can add this statement once,

using namespace std;

after your include preprocessors and may omit including std namespace afterwards like this,

cout << "Please enter a amount followed by a unit (p, y, or e): ";


5. e is a reserved char for using with integer/double etc numeric types. e means exponential. When entering currency, use a space before to explicitly tell cin that this e is not part of numerical input. Otherwise, you have to parse the input using strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that if you omit an explicit return from the end of main(), then the effect is as if you wrote return 0;. Only main() gets this exemption. I don't like it much, but it it the standard behaviour (and C99 also supports this, and therefore so does C11). – Jonathan Leffler Jan 3 '12 at 5:00
    
using "return 0" will be good. In old days we got compilation time errors in programming contests because of omitting that as most judge compiler were not so.. – Atique Jan 3 '12 at 5:04
    
Explicit qualification will be good if program is consuming good amount memory including unnecessary namespace members.. For little programs explicit qualifications wouldn't matter much. – Atique Jan 3 '12 at 5:21
    
I too disagree on most points. Point 2 is simply wrong: if (a) if (b) stmt; else stmt; parses the else as referring to the inner if, as can be seen here: ideone.com/atPqk I see what you mean. – Anton Golov Jan 3 '12 at 6:04
    
You are right but you misunderstood me. I didn't offend the fundamental syntax of c. I suggested it to make his program work and also comprehensive. I think if you look at his program you will understand. – Atique Jan 3 '12 at 6:07

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