Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am refreshing my C skills and am having a little bit of difficulty with a simple program I am working on. Here it is:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h> // for isdigit()
#include <stdlib.h> // for atoi()

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    // first read in # of file events to follow, if not an int,
    // complain & abort
    char *input;
    input = malloc(2); // input[0] holds the character
                       // input[1] holds the terminator

    int numLines = 0;
    scanf("%c", &input);
    if (isdigit((int)input)) {
        numLines = atoi(input);
    } else {
        printf("First line of input must be int type! Aborting...\n");
        return 1;
    }
    //...
}

The problem is, then even when I enter a number (i.e. 2) it still outputs the aborting message and exits:

2
First line of input must be int type! Aborting...

I am having a hard time figuring out why it behaves like it is and what I should do to fix the problem. Shouldn't the '%c' specifier tell the compiler to take in the input as an ANSI character and then isdigit() should properly interpret that to be an integer?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change this:

scanf("%c", &input);
if (isdigit((int)input)) {

to this:

scanf("%c", input);
if (isdigit(input[0])) {

As it is right now, you are overwriting the pointer itself, rather writing to the allocated memory.

Also, you need to null-terminate:

input[1] = '\0';

Furthermore, it's not necessary to allocate memory for this. You can get away with just:

char input[] = " ";
scanf("%c", input);
if (isdigit(input[0])) {
    numLines = atoi(input);

or alternatively:

char input;
scanf("%c", &input);
if (isdigit(input)) {
    numLines = input - '0';
share|improve this answer
    
It's actually exactly right. –  Dan Jan 3 '12 at 4:41
    
But you can't use atol() on the single char input;, can you? –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 3 '12 at 4:42
    
@JonathanLeffler Correct, I'm fixing it right now. –  Mysticial Jan 3 '12 at 4:43
    
Thanks for the explanation and for suggesting an alternate way of doing it. I ended up using that as it's more elegant. –  Stunner Jan 3 '12 at 4:50

Change your code to:

char input[2] = {0};  // <<-- you don't clear the memory after malloc,
                      // your atoi might fail. No need for malloc here.
int numLines = 0;
scanf("%c", &input[0]);
if (isdigit((int)input[0])) {
    numLines = atoi(input);
} else {
    printf("First line of input must be int type! Aborting...\n");
    return 1;
}

And you're good. No need to dynamically allocate here, its just a waste of effort.

share|improve this answer
    
What are you talking about? He's giving an address of a char *, which is wrong but not for the reason he said, and while using malloc is unnecessary, it isn't wrong. –  Dan Jan 3 '12 at 4:40
    
Note that nothing has set input[1] = '\0'; yet, so atol() is unreliable. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 3 '12 at 4:41
    
You can't have an array of size 0. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 3 '12 at 4:44
    
@Dan - doesn't matter, really. the point is that he's passing a wrong pointer –  littleadv Jan 3 '12 at 4:46
    
Thanks, tested your code and it worked. –  Stunner Jan 3 '12 at 5:04

When you pass &input to scanf, you are passing a pointer to a char *. You should just pass the pointer itself, that is,

scanf("%c", input);
share|improve this answer
    
It still wouldn't solve the problem. –  littleadv Jan 3 '12 at 4:48
    
Yeah, I tried doing this but I still get the same behavior. –  Stunner Jan 3 '12 at 5:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.