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I just can't seem to get my head around how to do this. I'm trying to come up with a regex (for .NET if it makes a difference) that can extract a sentence from a block of text that contains abbreviations with periods. Basically, I want to go from a specific start word, don't stop on a defined list of abbreviations, and end at the closing period.

A couple of examples might be:

Blah blah blah. Died of disease at Annapolis Junction, Md., February 2, 1862. Blah blah blah.

would capture "Died of disease at Annapolis Junction, Md., February 2, 1862." or

Blah blah blah. Died in General Hospital, Washington, D. C., September 17, 1862, of wounds received in action at Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862. Blah Blah Blah.

would capture "Died in General Hospital, Washington, D. C., September 17, 1862, of wounds received in action at Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862."

Using a simple expression of

Died [^\.]*\.

of course only matches up to the first period: "Died of disease at Annapolis Junction, Md."

The list abbreviations that need to be passed over will be from a controlled vocabulary so the regexp does not need to account for all possible abbreviations, only those in the list. ie: Md.|D. C.|Va.|Mich.

I know the following doesn't work, but it should give a rough idea of what I am trying to accomplish:

Died [^(Md\.|D\. C\.|Va\.|Mich\.)]*\.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

-Matt

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Are the examples always as you showed, where the desired sentence is in the middle? If so, you could just strip out the outer sentences. –  Origin Jan 3 '12 at 5:28
    
The sentences could occur just about anywhere in the text blocks and could start with any number of specific words. –  Matt Jan 3 '12 at 6:38

2 Answers 2

I don't think you'll be able to use Regex to skip over a list of things you don't want to match. You're better off looking for a different pattern.

This works with the two examples you've shown here, but I'm not sure if all your data looks like that:

Died.*[0-9]{4}\.

This basically matches "Died" and then everything up to four numbers (a date) followed by a period.

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Adapted from here (Regex to match . (periods marking end of sentences) but not Mr. (as in Mr. Hopkins))

private IEnumerable<string> GetSentences(string longString)
{
    var pattern = @"(?<!Md|D_C|Va|Mich|Md)\.";

    // Filter D. C. -> Replace with D_C.
    longString = longString.Replace("D. C.", "D_C.");
    var regex = new Regex(pattern);
    var matches = regex.Split(longString);

    var sentences = new List<string>(matches.Length);

    foreach (var match in matches)
    {
        var sentence = match.Replace("D_C.", "D. C.").Trim();
        if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(sentence) == false)
        {
            sentences.Add(sentence);
        }
    }

    return sentences;
}

The workaround for D. C. is because the pattern does not match this string, hence the replacement with D_C..


Example 1

Input
Blah blah blah. Died of disease at Annapolis Junction, Md., February 2, 1862. Blah blah blah.

Sentences

  • Blah blah blah
  • Died of disease at Annapolis Junction, Md., February 2, 1862
  • Blah blah blah

Example 2

Input
Blah blah blah. Died in General Hospital, Washington, D. C., September 17, 1862, of wounds received in action at Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862. Blah Blah Blah.

Sentences

  • Blah blah blah
  • Died in General Hospital, Washington, D. C., September 17, 1862, of wounds received in action at Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862
  • Blah blah blah
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