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I'd like to be able to send the HTML file I'm currently editing in vim to my web browser, Chrome. I'm running Linux.

This gets me very close:

nmap <silent> <leader>w :!google-chrome % &

The browser opens and displays the correct file. However, the command isn't running in the background, which is what the & is supposed to do. Instead vim drops to the background and I get some text output to my terminal window. I then have to do some clicking and Enter pressing to get my vim to come back to the foreground.

Am I missing something?

UPDATE: Thanks for all the suggestions. The issue seems to be that the focus seems to shift away from my terminal window when the browser window opens. Not sure if there's anything I can do about this.

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6 Answers 6

For Mac, you might have to type something that looks more like this:

nnoremap <F12>f :exe ':silent !open -a /Applications/Firefox.app %'<CR>
nnoremap <F12>c :exe ':silent !open -a /Applications/Google\ Chrome.app %'<CR>
nnoremap <F12>g :exe ':silent !open -a /Applications/Google\ Chrome.app %'<CR>
nnoremap <F12>s :exe ':silent !open /Applications/Safari.app %'<CR>

Notce it's Safari.app on the end...it'll save you a few minutes. :)

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Here are various tips on previewing files in your browser from Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X. Preview current HTML file

This mapping allows you to use a browser to preview the HTML file currently being edited.

 nnoremap <F5> :silent update<Bar>silent !firefox %:p &<CR>

If necessary, the current file is saved, then Firefox is used to open the file. Replace "firefox" with the name of another browser if wanted, such as "chromium-browser".

So as the question states that Chrome is the desired browser, then add this to your vimrc:

nnoremap <F5> :silent update<Bar>silent !chromium-browser %:p &<CR>

As well as answer the OP, I wanted to share this link for those that reached this question in search of Windows and Mac OS X support.

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I wrote a small plugin with 7 commands to handle web searches.

After installing you could use:

  • :WSearchInit to start a sites repository in the current folder
  • :WSearchSaveTagAndSite google www.google.com/search?q={WSearch} to save a site with corresponding tag

and then search with:

  • :WSearch will run your latest saved or searched site replacing {WSearch} with the cursored word
  • :WSearch Manual Search will do the same as WSearch but instead will replace {WSearch} with Manual+Search.

I hope it can help you or other people with the same problem.

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I use the shell.vim plugin to run commands in background on Windows. I don't know exactly what it does, but I believe it also works for that on Linux:

http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=3123

Shell.vim does allow for asynchronous external commands, but I don't know whether it allows you to keep focus with Vim terminal, avoid moving back manually.

Another plugin that allows asynchronous calls is below, although it relies on having Vim compiled with Python support and I haven't tested: https://github.com/MarcWeber/vim-addon-background-cmd

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From my .vimrc:

nnoremap <F12>f :exe ':silent !firefox %'<CR>
nnoremap <F12>c :exe ':silent !chromium-browser %'<CR>
nnoremap <F12>o :exe ':silent !opera %'<CR>

These three commands open the current file in the chosen browser without side effects. The use of <F12> makes it GVim-only, though.

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1  
How about using sensible-browser to open the default browser? –  Waxolunist May 2 '14 at 5:01

You can exec chrome silently:

nmap <silent> <leader>w :exec 'silent !google-chrome % &'

:exe[cute] {expr1} .. Executes the string that results from the evaluation of {expr1} as an Ex command.

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Thanks, but I'm still getting a similar result. It's writing to standard output, Created new window in existing browser session. I tried redirecting the output to /dev/null, but that didn't work either. –  Josh Earl Jan 3 '12 at 5:19
    
@JoshEarl. Try :exec –  kev Jan 3 '12 at 5:31
    
Grrr. Same result. vim has a lot of ways of doing the same thing. :) –  Josh Earl Jan 3 '12 at 6:16

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