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I am writing a WP7 app which restores its state on the main UI thread in its page's OnNavigatedTo() override handler. In this handler, it sets the page's listbox ItemsSource property to the deserialized ObservableCollection of data items. The deserialization is from isolated storage and is quick enough that it doesn't hang the thread.

However, when the page comes up, the listbox is empty. Upon setting a breakpoint and inspecting the state of the page, the Items property is correctly populated and non-empty.

If I delay the settings of the ItemsSource property like so:

protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
{
  base.OnNavigatedTo(e);

  int delayMs = 100; // Why 100 ?
  runDelayedDispatch(Deployment.Current.Dispatcher, 
   delayMs, delegate() 
  {
    deserializeFromStorageAndSetItemsSource();
  });
}

...

// Does a BeginInvoke() after the specified delay.
public static void runDelayedDispatch(Dispatcher dispatcher,
  int delayInMilliseconds, Action action)
{
  Action dispatcherAction = delegate()
  {
    dispatcher.BeginInvoke(action);
  };

  BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
  worker.DoWork += (s, e) => Thread.Sleep(delayInMilliseconds);
  worker.RunWorkerCompleted += (s, e) => dispatcherAction.Invoke();
  worker.RunWorkerAsync();
}

Then everything works fine.

What am I doing wrong? Should I be reading from isolated storage on a different handler or later in the application lifecycle?

Articles about app lifecycle have not shed any light on this :(

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.controls.page.onnavigatedto(v=vs.95).aspx http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc838245(v=vs.95).aspx http://windowsphonegeek.com/articles/WP7-Application-Lifecycle-and-Tombstoning http://visualstudiomagazine.com/articles/2011/06/01/pcmob_app-lifecycle.aspx

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
that runDelayedDispatch is a cool function -- consider making delayInMilliseconds a TimeSpan instead though. –  William Melani Jan 3 '12 at 6:17
    
what are the benefits? :) –  swinefeaster Jan 3 '12 at 6:28
    
btw i got it from here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4726239/… –  swinefeaster Jan 3 '12 at 6:30
1  
Well, say you want to set the event to fire after 10 seconds, or 1 minute. or 1 hour, etc- you don't need to worry about 'Is there 84600 milliseconds in a hour' (or w/e). Just set a TimeSpan to an 1 hour. Reduces the need to read the variable name to understand the value which should be passed to the function. –  William Melani Jan 3 '12 at 7:15

3 Answers 3

It sounds like maybe your data context isn't set correctly, your binding isn't set correctly, or your INotifyPropertyChanged isn't firing.

PS: I think you should reword your question to get rid of your attempt to bypass the problem with a delay - that is giving you answers along lines you don't want and I'm pretty sure it isn't needed at all. Instead, put the ALL the RELEVANT code for the list and page in your question so we can see what you're doing.

share|improve this answer

All you have to do is to refresh the UI using INotifyPropertyChanged

protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
{
  base.OnNavigatedTo(e);

  int delayMs = 100; // Why 100 ?
  runDelayedDispatch(Deployment.Current.Dispatcher, 
   delayMs, delegate() 
  {
    deserializeFromStorageAndSetItemsSource();
  });

  NotifyPropertyChange("UI");
}

public static void runDelayedDispatch(Dispatcher dispatcher,
  int delayInMilliseconds, Action action)
{
  Action dispatcherAction = delegate()
  {
    dispatcher.BeginInvoke(action);
  };

  BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
  worker.DoWork += (s, e) => Thread.Sleep(delayInMilliseconds);
  worker.RunWorkerCompleted += (s, e) => dispatcherAction.Invoke();
  worker.RunWorkerAsync();

  NotifyPropertyChanged("UI");
}

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String info)
{
  if (PropertyChanged != null)
  {
    PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. can you please reformat your code snippet? i'm trying to follow... –  swinefeaster Jan 3 '12 at 6:28
    
what is "DisplayItem"? where did it come from? –  swinefeaster Jan 3 '12 at 6:29
    
that was in my code sorry –  Apoorva Jan 3 '12 at 6:47
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/7526650/… if u follow this code it might help. and i dont think u should use delay. –  Apoorva Jan 3 '12 at 7:14
    
But I am actually setting the ListBox.ItemsSource property to a new value, so shouldn't it already know that it has changed and update accordingly? I have looked at your link but I don't think it applies in this case; it would only be necessary if I was modifying the ObservableCollection's contents after setting it (I am creating a new ObservableCollection) –  swinefeaster Jan 3 '12 at 7:19

I found it, thanks all! I went back to the basics and tested this scenario from a bare bones list box and it worked in the OnNavigatedTo() without any problem.

The culprit was that I was hooking into receiving notification when the DataContext had changed in order to bind the width of the listbox items to the listbox width, but I could easily accomplish this by hooking into the LayoutUpdated event.

Here was the culprit code that I removed: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/38559/Silverlight-DataContext-Changed-Event

Thanks guys and sorry for wasting your time :|

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