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  1. I was going through this article http://www.vaannila.com/spring/spring-ioc-1.html and here the term container is used. The diagram below shows container. What is container in this article? Is it a piece of code or the bean config file?

  2. Can Spring IOC be used in Spring MVC?

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Container is used to describe any component that can contain other components inside itself.

As per the Spring documentation here

The BeanFactory interface is the central IoC container interface in Spring. Its
responsibilities include instantiating or sourcing application objects, configuring such objects, and assembling the dependencies between these objects.

IOC is the core principle which Spring uses for Separation of concern concept . No matter what you use - Spring MVC, Security , Core , DAO integrations , you will be using the IOC principle.

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This documentation is very useful.. Cleared my doubts. – akash746 Dec 26 '13 at 17:34

In this context a container has the meaning of something that provides an infrastructrure needed by some components to life.

You can imagine it this way:

  • Like the JVM is a container to run Java Programms,
  • a Tomcat (or Servlet Container in general) is the thing that runs servlets
  • a EJB-Container is the environmet where EJB live (see this wikipedia article (in german, but you can use your browser translator))

The same way Spring is the container where Spring Beans live.

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Container is piece of code which reads bean config file and performs corresponding actions.

Yes IOC can be used with MVC. Here is an article about it. spring mvc

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