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In a makefile that is generated by eclipse, I see the following rules:

./Cores/$(TARGET).core.3.srec : ../$(TARGET).core.3/Debug/$(TARGET).core.3.elf
        @mkdir -p ./Cores/
        @e-objcopy --srec-forceS3 --output-target srec "$<" "$@".temp
        @echo Creating srec file for CoreID\<0x826\>
        @head --lines=1 "$@".temp  | sed 's/0000/0826/' > "$@"
        @tail --lines=+2 "$@".temp >> "$@"

What is the purpose of the "@" at the beginning of the recipe lines?

Reading through the GNU Make user's manual I could not find a reference to this use of @. I then assumed that it is actually transferred as-is to the shell.

So, reading the BASH manual, the only place I could relate to this use is in command substitution when the extglob option is set. However, trying this in the command line gave me an error.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The @ prefix causes make to run the command silently. See this section of the GNU make manual.

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Thanks! So, is it a make command or a shell command (modifier/directive)? – ysap Jan 3 '12 at 6:46
    
@@%$#! - I knew I missed it... Thanks for the pointer. – ysap Jan 3 '12 at 6:49
    
It's a GNU make feature. – Paul R Jan 3 '12 at 6:50

The @ suppresses echoing the command when running the recipe, see http://stackoverflow.com/a/867093/60462.

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Thanks! So, is it a make command or a shell command (modifier/directive)? – ysap Jan 3 '12 at 6:45
1  
It's make syntax alone. Or did @ls ever give you a directory listing? – Jens Aug 30 '15 at 17:51

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