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I have a problem that has been bothering me now for a few days. I have tried to Google the problem, but so far have not been able to find any solutions, not even a single person with the same problem.

It seems that the C# method System.Buffer.BlockCopy leaves you with some sort of memory ghosts. I have for example this method:

private float[,] readFloatArray2 (byte[] b) {
   int floatSize = sizeof(float);
   float[,] v = new float[2, (b.Length / 2) / floatSize];
   System.Buffer.BlockCopy(b, 0, v, 0, b.Length);

   return v;
}

to convert a byte array to a 2D float array. The data is previously read from a stream. I have located the problem to be the System.Buffer.BlockCopy method.

If I remove the BlockCopy command, the memory used by the application will be half the size. this means that its not my fault that the byte array is still alive. because without the BlockCopy command, the byte array dies properly. the float array gets created anyway (with or without the copied information).

I am not quite sure if this is a problem of the BlockCopy command or the GC because I have also tried to call System.GC.Collect(); after the BlockCopy and then it also works perfectly (I know you should not do this... thats why I am asking for advise here).

I also wouldn't bother asking, but the issue involves several hundred meg.

Besides the memory issues, the method works perfectly fine. Does anyone know what causes the memory problem?

greetings and thanks in advance oli

ps: I am using .NET4.0 with Visual Studio 2010 PRO and WIN7... don't know whether this is relevant or not.

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2  
If you say the memory is properly collected by a GC.Collect then everything is fine. b will eventually be collected by a normal GC when the time comes. –  buttiful buttefly Jan 3 '12 at 10:11
    
If you're working on audio data, I'd use a jagged array of the form float[len][channelCount]. That way you can treat channels separately, which is sometimes useful. –  CodesInChaos Jan 3 '12 at 11:07
1  
"the float array gets created anyway" Only half true. It doesn't necessarily need physical memory yet. Memory pages that are all 0 and have never been written to, are optimized by the windows memory manager. –  CodesInChaos Jan 3 '12 at 11:09

4 Answers 4

BlockCopy doesn't have managed .NET implementation. Internally, it invokes external win api.

[SecuritySafeCritical]
public static extern void BlockCopy(Array src, int srcOffset, Array dst, int dstOffset, int count);
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ok... and how to deal with this problem? what do you suggest? –  Oliver Bernhardt Jan 3 '12 at 10:07
    
Nothing. GC will take care of it eventually when it needs the extra memory. –  Tomislav Markovski Jan 3 '12 at 10:13

Buffer.BlockCopy is byte-based rather than index-based. I would suggest you to use Array.Copy which basically does the same thing. BlockCopy is just slightly faster.

you need to convert the byte[] to float[] first.Have a look at the below for that

static float[] ConvertByteArrayToFloat(byte[] bytes)
{
    if(bytes == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("bytes");

   if(bytes.Length % 4 != 0)
        throw new ArgumentException
              ("bytes does not represent a sequence of floats");

    return Enumerable.Range(0, bytes.Length / 4)
                     .Select(i => BitConverter.ToSingle(bytes, i * 4))
                     .ToArray();
}
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But Array.Copy does not work with different datatypes. I cannot use it to copy from byte[] to float[,]. –  Oliver Bernhardt Jan 3 '12 at 10:56
    
I have edited my answer –  Massimiliano Peluso Jan 3 '12 at 11:03
    
yeah... ok... thats cool but I have a 1D byte array to a 2D float array (float [ , ]). But your suggestion is cool. I did not knew this. (coding in C# for 4 month now) –  Oliver Bernhardt Jan 3 '12 at 11:06

I have located the problem to be the System.Buffer.BlockCopy method. If I remove the BlockCopy command, the memory used by the application will be half the size. this means that its not my fault that the byte array is still alive. Because without the BlockCopy command, the byte array dies properly.

I disagree with that conclusion. I see several phases:

  1. The byte array exists and is filled with data
  2. You allocate the float array, but it isn't filled with data yet.
  3. You fill the float array with data
  4. The byte array isn't referenced anymore, but hasn't been collected yet
  5. The byte array has been collected.

The live of the byte array isn't influenced by BlockCopy.

Step 2 reserves and commits virtual memory. So the commit size grows in this step. But since the content of the array has never been written to, and consists entirely of 00 bytes, the windows memory manager doesn't allocate any physical memory for it. It just notes that these pages consist entirely of 00s.

The physical memory for the float array get only allocated in step 3. You'd get the same effect if you'd add a loop that initialized every field in the array.


Apart from the actual problem, I also have some design suggestions:

  1. Reuse buffers. The GC is good for small shortlived objects, but very bad for large shortlived objects. This means you should not use functions that allocate and return large arrays. Instead take them as a parameter, so an existing array can be reused.
  2. If you're using working with audio data(Seems likely), I wouldn't use a solid 2D array. I'd instead use an array of arrays. Where the inner array represents the samples in a single buffer, and the outer array represents the buffers. This has two advantages:

    • You can easily write code that only operates on a single channel.
    • Solid 2D arrays are slow to index, so it's often faster too.
  3. Do you really want to read all data at once? I'd read in chunks of a few kilobytes.
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I am a bioinformatition so, no i do not work with audio files. More like with MS spectra. I need the WHOLE data for processing and therefore the design suggestions 1. and 2. are no option (step 1 is no option because the length of the readed bytes differ dramatically (from 32 bytes to >10.000.000)). Design suggestion 3 is also not an option because I do have to process different parts of the data more than once to highlight different aspects. reloading everything on the fly is therefore not possible because I need the whole set of information till the end of the process. but thanks anyway :) –  Oliver Bernhardt Jan 3 '12 at 13:11
    
Oh... and to suggestion 3, I do not read ALL at once. I read spectra-wise. And one spectra size can differ from 32B to >10MB. And I have about about 80.000 spectra to read. Every single on of those is necessary for the processing. –  Oliver Bernhardt Jan 3 '12 at 13:27

I am not quite sure if this is a problem of the BlockCopy command or the GC because I have also tried to call System.GC.Collect(); after the BlockCopy and then it also works perfectly (I know you should not do this... thats why I am asking for advise here). I also wouldn't bother asking if it wasn't about several hundret MB we are talking about.

Garbage Collection runs when there is a need for more memory for the particular generation, or from the LOH. As a rule Garbage Collection will not run just because there is garbage to collect, and as a rule this is a good thing (it really doesn't cost us anything to have gigabytes of memory officially "in use" that we aren't using as long as GC can get it when we do need it).

There are times when calling GC.Collect() does make sense in a real program, and this may well be one of them, so if doing so "works perfectly", then I wouldn't worry too much about it being against best-practice for 99.9% of the code. The reason it's "best practice" rather than a hard-and-fast rule is that sometimes we're in the 0.1% case and what's normally best practice is no longer the best practice at all.

Also, if you can predict ahead of time the maximum size of the arrays (or failing that, of just the source byte arrays), then CodeInChaos' first approach may work. It doesn't actually hurt to use 10,000,000 bytes to process 32 as long as at some time you will indeed be using that 10,000,000. Re-using that 10,000,000 makes for a very real saving over the lifetime of the process.

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