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I have this program written in C++ Builder 6. I didn't write all the code, just some of it. The language, however, is not C++ (as far as I'm aware) - it looks more like Delphi or Pascal. So that's why I included them all in the tags.

I have an int called Oversteering.

try
{
    Oversteering=HoursCounter.ToInt();
}
catch(EConvertError &convertError)
{
    Oversteering=0;
}

HoursCounter is an AnsiString, and it is in the form of an int.

Since this is the only try/catch statement in the whole code (that's not too good, I know), and I couldn't find any good example of such in Delphi/Pascal/???, I don't know if it's correctly written.

Well, I try to convert the string to an int. Sometimes I get this error:

error

That is, an exception called EConvertError has occurred.

So my question is: why is this exception NOT caught by the catch statement?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried catching const reference? –  BЈовић Jan 3 '12 at 10:34
4  
The language in the code snippet is indeed C++, but the class library is basically the same as used in Delphi which might make it look more like Delphi in some cases. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 3 '12 at 10:37
    
On your exception it mentions "" isn't a valid integer value. Your conversion from a string to an int isn't happening, maybe because of a null string, I am assuming. –  DumbCoder Jan 3 '12 at 10:38
    
@JoachimPileborg Thanks, I understand better now! –  eightx2 Jan 3 '12 at 10:55
    
Just as a sidenote: can you use the Delphi function TryStrToInt()? –  Ritsaert Hornstra Jan 3 '12 at 11:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

This error is shown by the debugger when running through the code, if you run the exe and have the same situation the error message will not be shown to you

The exception is caught but the debugger is notifiying you regarding the error in the code

that is here

  try
     {
      Oversteering=HoursCounter.ToInt();
     }

since running in the debugger the ,your trying to convert (blankspace) '' to integer, the debugger will show the exception...but when running the exe, the debugger will set

       Oversteering=0

check this from about.com

Break On Exceptions When building a program with exception handling, you may not want Delphi to break on Exceptions. This is a great feature if you want Delphi to show where an exception has occurred; however, it can be annoying when you test your own exception handling.

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Don't you mean "Debugger" and not "Compiler". The compiler's work is already finished when you debug the code. –  Andreas Hausladen Jan 3 '12 at 10:44
    
@AndreasHausladen im sory, its debugger..i will update –  PresleyDias Jan 3 '12 at 10:46
    
Many thanks @PresleyDias, it seems it's working after all :) I'm just not used to seeing a real break when an exception is caught (I'm used to C# programming in VS). –  eightx2 Jan 3 '12 at 10:57
    
ok, when i started with delphi exception handling i had the annoying problem 'y cant this exception handling work..!!!' then i came across the website about.com and it cleared why it was breaking –  PresleyDias Jan 3 '12 at 10:59

As @PresleyDias explained, it is the debugger that is displaying the exception, not your app. The exception is being caught (you should be catching it by a const reference, though), but the debugger sees it before your app does, that's all. You can configure the debugger to ignore EConvertError, if you like.

A better solution is to avoid the exception in the first place. If you use AnsiString::ToIntDef() instead, you can remove the try/catch block completely:

Oversteering = HoursCounter.ToIntDef(0); 

Alternatively, you can use TryStrToInt() instead:

if (!TryStrToInt(HoursCounter, Oversteering))
{
    ...;
}

If 0 is a valid value for your counter, use TryStrToInt():

if (TryStrToInt(HoursCounter, Oversteering))
{
    // use Oversteering as needed, even zeros...
}
else
    ShowMessage("Cannot convert HoursCounter to a valid integer!");

If 0 always represents an error, then use ToIntDef():

Oversteering = HoursCounter.ToIntDef(0);
if (Oversteering != 0)
{
    // use Oversteering as needed, except zeros...
}
else
    ShowMessage("Cannot convert HoursCounter to an acceptable integer!");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for preventing the exception in the first place –  Andreas Hausladen Jan 4 '12 at 12:37

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