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The code I want to execute in my exception handler may itself throw an exception.

Is the follow structure legal C++? If yes, are there any downsides?

try
{
    // ...
}
catch (const E&)
{
    try
    {
        // ...
    }
    catch (const F&)
    {

    }
}
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Yes, its perfectly valid. –  Anand Jan 3 '12 at 11:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

No, there are no downsides. That's the way you should do it.

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Actually, there is even an interesting technique for using nested try/catch-blocks: assume you have multiple functions which need effectively the same exception handling. Especially when wrapping another interface this is common scenario. In this case it is possible to catch all exceptions, call a function from the exception handler, and in this function rethrow the exception to implement the actual exception handling:

void fancy_handler() {
    try {
        throw; // assumes that fancy_handler() is called from catch-clause
    } catch (std::runtime_error const& rt) {
        std::cout << "runtime-error: " << ex.what() << "\n";
    } catch (std::exception const& ex) {
        std::cout << "excption: " << ex.what() << "\n";
    } catch (...) {
        std::cout << "unknown exception\n";
    }
}

void foo() { try { do_foo(); } catch (...) { fancy_handler(); } }
void bar() { try { do_bar(); } catch (...) { fancy_handler(); } }

I just love avoiding duplicate [non-trivial] code!

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wait, can you really throw from a nested function? I've never seen such a thing! –  Mooing Duck Jan 3 '12 at 20:52
    
@MooingDuck: as long as you called the function from a catch-block, you can rethrow the exception. What is even more interesting is that this also works in Java and C# (I used this technique originally in Java to deal with a huge number of different database exceptions; I was the C++ expert not the Java expert, though ;) –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 3 '12 at 20:56
    
I'll have to look in the standard and learn the details, and corners. –  Mooing Duck Jan 3 '12 at 21:22
    
@MooingDuck: I can only tell you for C++: except.handle paragraph 7: "A handler is considered active when initialization is complete for the formal parameter (if any) of the catch clause." and except.throw pragraph 8: "A throw-expression with no operand rethrows the currently handled exception [...]". –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 3 '12 at 21:38
    
The bit I was looking up specificically was int main() {fancy_handler();} –  Mooing Duck Jan 3 '12 at 21:43

It's a perfectly valid way to code.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;



int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
        try       //outer try{}
        {
                try   //inner try{}
                {
                    throw std::runtime_error("Demo");
                }
                catch (std::runtime_error& e)
                {
                    std::cerr << "Inner Exception-Handler: " << e.what() << std::endl;
                    throw;
                }
        }
        catch (std::exception& e)
        {
            std::cerr << "Outer Exception-Handler: " << e.what() << std::endl;
        }

    return 0;
}
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