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For few days I have been trying to figure out how to use make console update text-box as its executing. I came to conclusion, that threading is absolutely necessary to run form and console process at the same time. Process itself is standalone program so I use standard output to get information out of it, and if I wouldn't need it to update textbox as its working, it would be great, but the problem is that it only updates after execution of the process although I am, in fact, using multithreading.

Is start of making delegate for function that runs the process and handles output, as well as string that I use for exchanging info between threads and lock:

    private static readonly object _locker = new object();
    volatile string exchange = "";
    delegate void CallDelegate(string filename);

Heres the function itself:

    public void CallConsole(string filename)
    {
        Thread.CurrentThread.Name = "ProccessThread";
        Thread.CurrentThread.IsBackground = false;
        Process p = new Process();
        p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
        p.StartInfo.FileName = filename;
        if (checkBox1.Checked)
            p.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
        string output;
        p.Start();
        while (!p.HasExited)
        {
            lock (_locker)
            {
                output = p.StandardError.ReadToEnd();
                if (output.Length != 0)
                {
                    exchange = output;
                    Thread.Sleep(100);
                    MessageBox.Show(output);
                }
                output = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
                exchange = output;
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);
            }
        }
    }

And here's the execution of the program after button_click

    private void button1_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        textBox2.Text = "";
        //Thread.CurrentThread.Name = "Main";
        CallDelegate call = new CallDelegate (CallConsole);
        IAsyncResult tag = call.BeginInvoke(textBox1.Text, null, null);
        button1.IsAccessible = false;
        while (!tag.IsCompleted)
        {
            string temp = "";
            lock (_locker)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(50);
                if (exchange.Length != 0)
                {
                    temp = exchange;
                    exchange = "";
                }
            }
            if (temp.Length != 0)
                textBox2.Text = textBox2.Text + temp;
        }
        call.EndInvoke(tag);
        button1.IsAccessible = true;
    }

Note: textbox1 is file path textbox2 is read only multiline textbox

Any ideas why its updating only after CallConsole is done?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

General problem: you're looping within button1_Click_1, effectively blocking the UI thread. That prevents other events from being handled - including redrawing etc.

You shouldn't do that; instead, if you want to poll something, set up a timer to do the polling, allowing the UI to handle events in the "idle" time.

More immediate problem: you're calling ReadToEnd on a reader from an unfinished process. This will (I believe) block until the process has completed. (Before it's finished, the reader doesn't have an "end" as such.) That means you've got one thread holding a lock and blocking until the process has completed - and then you're trying to acquire that lock in the UI thread.

I'd also suggest making the whole thing less poll-dependent to start with - look at the events on the Process class, and try to handle those instead of blocking in a separate thread. When one of those events occurs, you can post back to the UI thread (with Control.Invoke) to update the UI... then nothing need to poll.

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I think Jon Skeet is one of the best thing's that happened to SO and C# . –  Burimi Jan 3 '12 at 14:48

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