Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an application that invokes my DLL with InvokeMember() like so:

Assembly OCA = Assembly.LoadFrom("./Modules/ProcessFiles.dll");
Type[] types = OCA.GetTypes();
foreach (var type in types)
{
    //MethodInfo[] methods = type.GetMethods();
    if (type.Name == "Converter")
    {
        var tmpType = type;
        var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(tmpType);
        Thread t = new Thread(
            () =>
            tmpType.InvokeMember("Run", BindingFlags.Default | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, obj,
            null));
        t.Start();
        break;
    }

}

My DLL then creates new a thread and starts processing. In my DLL, I the create new thread like this:

Thread thread = new Thread(
    delegate(){
        while(true)
        {
            GetFilesInFolder();
            Thread.Sleep(120000);
        }
    });
ne.Start();

The goal is to periodically check the folder. The problem is that when I close the application that invokes my DLL, the process is not closed. Is there a way to close all the threads?

NB: I can’t modify the application, I can only modify my DLL.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Set the IsBackground property of the thread to true. This will kill the thread when your app finishes.

Also: Why don't you use one timer (or just one thread), that wakes and eximines the data. That should be more resource friendly.

share|improve this answer
    
I did try to use timer but i couldnt get the Threading.Timer working. –  hs2d Jan 3 '12 at 11:42
    
There's also Timers.Timer –  Ilya Kogan Jan 3 '12 at 11:44
    
Yes, i know about that allso. Maybe you can give me a working example how to use the Timer in my situation? –  hs2d Jan 3 '12 at 11:54
    
new Timer(GetFilesInFolder, null, 1000, 12000); Thread.Sleep(Timeout.Infinite); This is how i tryied to use the timer, but it still executed the method just once. –  hs2d Jan 3 '12 at 12:06
    
Well, if you use a Timer then obviously it doesn't make sense to put the timer thread to sleep for an infinite amount of time. Just delete the "Thread.Sleep(Timeout.Infinite);" line and you should be good. –  afrischke Jan 3 '12 at 12:20

Did you try using a System.IO.FileSystemWatcher? this throws events when something changes in a folder. It looks like this will simplify your solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, im using FileSystemWatcher allso for new files and chenges. But its bit more compilcated. Some files are just not ready to process and i have to leave them in that folder and come check up on them later. –  hs2d Jan 3 '12 at 11:44

How about implementing Safe Cancellation from here

class RulyCanceler
{
  object _cancelLocker = new object();
  bool _cancelRequest;
  public bool IsCancellationRequested
  {
    get { lock (_cancelLocker) return _cancelRequest; }
  }

  public void Cancel() { lock (_cancelLocker) _cancelRequest = true; } 

  public void ThrowIfCancellationRequested()
  {
    if (IsCancellationRequested) throw new OperationCanceledException();
  }
}

Test

class Test
{
  static void Main()
  {
    var canceler = new RulyCanceler();
    new Thread (() => {
                        try { Work (canceler); }
                        catch (OperationCanceledException)
                        {
                          Console.WriteLine ("Canceled!");
                        }
                      }).Start();
    Thread.Sleep (1000);
    canceler.Cancel();               // Safely cancel worker.
  }

  static void Work (RulyCanceler c)
  {
    while (true)
    {
      c.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
      // ...
      try      { OtherMethod (c); }
      finally  { /* any required cleanup */ }
    }
  }

  static void OtherMethod (RulyCanceler c)
  {
    // Do stuff...
    c.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You can use background thread mentioned above or timer:

Timer checkTimer;
public void StartTimer()
{
    checkTimer = new Timer(s => GetFilesInFolder(), null, 0, 120000);
}

Don't forget to Dispose it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.