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I'm in the process of creating a double-linked list, and have overloaded the operator= to make on list equal another:

template<class T>
void operator=(const list<T>& lst)
{
    clear();
    copy(lst);
    return;
}

but I get this error when I try to compile:

container_def.h(74) : error C2801: 'operator =' must be a non-static member

Also, if it helps, line 74 is the last line of the definition, with the "}".

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What context is this in? In the class? At toplevel? –  bdonlan May 15 '09 at 23:42
2  
Don't really need the language in the question name since its also tagged C++ –  Simon Hartcher May 16 '09 at 0:16
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Exactly what it says: operator overloads with 1 parameter must be member functions. (declared inside the class)

template<class T>
void list<T>::operator=(const list<T>& rhs)
{
    ...
}

Also, it's probably a good idea to return the LHS from = so you can chain it (like a = b = c) - so make it list<T>& list<T>::operator=....

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Yeah, I just realized: I declared it in the class, but wrote "void operator=" instead of "void list<T>::operator=" –  user98188 May 15 '09 at 23:44
7  
I'm sorry, but this is wrong. operator= must be a member (like the compiler says). Same is true for operator[] and operator() and possibly some others i miss. Basically all those that have to do with modifying state instead of producing a value. Correct your answer and i'll retract the -1. Keand64's problem was he missed to specify the class (list<T>::), which hasn't got much to do with this answer. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 16 '09 at 0:01
    
Oh, oops. Sorry about that >< –  v3. May 16 '09 at 2:21
3  
Don't worry. We all have our segfaults :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 16 '09 at 14:21
1  
Your answer is still misleading. It is not about the fact that operator overloads with 1 parameter must be member functions, but that there is no two parameter version of the assignment operator. –  Markus Mayr Jul 26 '13 at 7:16
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Put that operator inside your class definition. It must be a member because operator= is special and you would not gain something by writing it as a non-member anyway. A non-member operator has two important main benefits:

  • Implicit conversions of the right and the left side of the operator invocation
  • No need to know about internals of the class. Function can be realized as non-member non-friend.

For operator=, both is not usable. Assigning to a temporary result of a conversion does not make sense, and operator= will need access to internals in most cases. In addition, a special operator= is automatically provided by C++ if you don't provide one (the so-called copy-assignment operator). Making it possible to overload operator= as a non-member would have introduced additional complexity for apparently no practical gain, and so that isn't allowed.

So change your code so that it looks like this (this assumes the operator= is not a copy-assignment operator, but assigning from a list<T> to something else. This isn't clear from your question):

class MyClass {
...
    template<class T>
    MyClass& operator=(const list<T>& lst)
    {
        clear();
        copy(lst);
        return *this;
    }
...
};

It's pretty standard that a operator= returns a reference to itself again. I recommend you to adhere to that practice. It will look familiar to programmers and could cause surprises if it would return void all of a sudden.

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If you overload an operator as a member function, you should use this template:

class A {
  A& operator=(const A& other) {
    if (this != &other) {
      ...
    }
    return *this;
  }
}

Three things to note:

  1. Check for self-assignment with the assignment operator (as above);
  2. The argument should be a const reference; and
  3. Return the result of the operation as a non-const reference where you return *this to allow chaining of operators.

You can also overload an operator external to the class. This isn't relevant to this example because you can't do it with the assignment operator but it's worth noting because in many cases it's superior to member functions. The typical form is:

class A {
  friend const A& operator+(const A& a, const A& b);
  ...
}
const A& operator+(const A& a, const A& b) {
  A& ret = ...
  return ret;
}

This one returns a const reference so you can't do this:

(a + b) = c
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Does it really have to be static? No static works fine for me in g++. –  v3. May 15 '09 at 23:43
    
Sorry getting my wires crossed. Functions not within classes are static by default. You can put the static keyword in but it's not necessary so there's no difference so I removed it. –  cletus May 15 '09 at 23:46
    
the operator= must be a member (same is true for operator[]). I would use another example to show the non-member way. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 15 '09 at 23:48
    
Again you are correct. Fixed and updated. –  cletus May 16 '09 at 0:11
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From C++ Standard, "Binary Operators":

"A binary operator shall be implemented either by a non-static member function with one parameter or by a non-member function with two parameters"

It wants you to define this in a class, as a member, or make it a static method (in which case it should take two parameters (for both the lval and the rval).

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