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If you have a project that builds one project before building the next, but the next needs to know the 'path' of the first build, is it possible to get this?

For example:

Project A has Build Configuration A and Build Configuration B.

Build Configuration B has a dependency on Build Configuration A. From without the Build Configuration B it will need access to the path of Build Configuration A. Is there are a way to obtain this?

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2 Answers 2

Most simple approach would be to define a custom checkout directory in the A and use the same hard-coded value in B.

If you use TeamCity snapshot or artifact dependencies, you can use %dep.btXXX.teamcity.build.checkoutDir% to get checkout directory of the dependency build. However, this will not work in 6.5.0-6.5.5 TeamCity versions, see details and workaround in the issue TW-18715.

However, you should really avoid accessing checkout directory of one build from another. If you need sources of A, you can checkout them in B; if you output of the A's build, then publishing the output as build's artifacts and then using TeamCity artifact dependencies is the way to go. In both cases additionally using TeamCity snapshot dependencies will ensure both builds use the same sources snapshot which is probably what you need.

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If you have one agent, and only ever one agent then you could try and use the path from a previous build.

I wouldn't recommend doing this however because if you had two agents, or scaled up in the future to two agents, then it is possible your projects will be built on different agents; this would mean your dependency working directory won't be on the same machine, or it will be outdated as the latest was built elsewhere.

I assume you're after the path of the first build to get its output?

If so, the method we use to share dependencies between projects is to checkin the output from each project into our source control, then every project that requires the output simply has to check them out.

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