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I have a CSV file formatted like this:

id @ word @ information @ other information

Sometimes, the first column has repeat occurrences:

001 @ cat @ makes a great pet @ mice
002 @ rat @ makes a great friend @ cheese
003 @ dog @ can guard the house @ chicken
004 @ cat @ can jump very high @ fish

You can see, the first and last lines have duplicate data in column 2. I want to delete these duplicates (if column 2 is exactly the same) and merge the information contained in column three as well as the information contained in column four. The result is like this:

001 @ cat @ ① makes a great pet ② can jump very high @ ① mice ② fish
002 @ rat @ makes a great friend @ cheese
003 @ dog @ can guard the house @ chicken
  • I am using these symbols to number the data: "①", "②", "③", etc., but "(1)", "(2)", "(3)", etc. will be okay too.

How can I merge the data in the cells in so that all of the data from the third column is assembled together into one cell and the data in the fourth column is assembled together into one cell?

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3  
I know this isn't part of the question, but is there a reason you're using CSV for this? If you were to use even a lightweight database (e.g. sqlite), these problems with data redundancy would be taken care of for you. You can even just import your current data into a proper database, which will handle it. –  Dan Fego Jan 3 '12 at 14:46
    
First, I lack knowledge of these database systems. Also, I'm preparing a CSV file for use in some other software which can only import CSV files. –  Village Jan 3 '12 at 14:57
1  
CSV files cannot be parsed as (comma|tab|at)-delimited fields, they may contain escape sequnces or quoting that needs to be handled properly (they may even contain newlines) so the only valid answer so far is the one that uses Python because it uses a true parser. –  Samus_ Jan 9 '12 at 14:38
    
Would you be interested in a solution to this that uses PHP? It could be a command line script if you like. –  Sebastián Grignoli Jan 13 '12 at 14:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

I worked in ruby (doing this in bash would be kinda painful).

First I wrote a spec to describe the problem:

require 'rubygems'
require 'rspec'
require './chew'

describe 'indentation' do
  it "should calculate appropriate padding (minimum 3)" do
    indentation(1).should == 3
    indentation(99).should == 3
    indentation(999).should == 3
    indentation(1000).should == 4
    indentation(1500).should == 4
    indentation(10000).should == 5
  end
end

describe 'chew' do
  it "should merge duplicate entries in a csv file" do

    input = <<-TEXT
001 @ cat @ makes a great pet @ mice
002 @ rat @ makes a great friend @ cheese
003 @ dog @ can guard the house @ chicken
004 @ cat @ can jump very high @ fish
    TEXT

    output = <<-TEXT
001 @ cat @ (1) makes a great pet (2) can jump very high @ (1) mice (2) fish
002 @ rat @ makes a great friend @ cheese
003 @ dog @ can guard the house @ chicken
    TEXT

    chew(input).should == output

  end
end

Here's a solution:

#! /bin/bash/env ruby

def merged_values(values)
  return values[0] if values.size == 1
  merged = []
  values.each_with_index do |value, i|
    merged << "(#{i+1}) #{value}"
  end
  merged.join(" ")
end

def indentation(count)
  [3, Math.log10(count) + 1].max.to_i
end

def chew(input)

  records = Hash.new {|hash, key| hash[key] = [[],[]]}
  input.split(/\n/).each do |row|
    row_number, key, first_value, second_value = row.split(/\s*@\s*/)
    records[key][0] << first_value
    records[key][1] << second_value
    records
  end

  row_number_format = "%0.#{indentation(records.size)}d"

  result = ""
  records.each_with_index do |record, i|
    key, values = record
    result << [
      row_number_format % (i+1),
      key,
      merged_values(values[0]),
      merged_values(values[1])
    ].join(" @ ") << "\n"
  end
  result

end

if $0 == __FILE__
  abort "usage: ruby chew.rb input_file" unless ARGV.size == 1
  puts chew(File.read(ARGV[0]))
end

I opted for the simpler numbering scheme, because what happens if there are more than 50 values to merge? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enclosed_alphanumerics

I took the liberty of increasing the left padding when there are lots of records.

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1  
Really nice solution … +1 –  jaypal Jan 11 '12 at 6:19

The task as described is rather tricky and cannot be done without some awk handy work. Using the techniques described by mouviciel I have a solution.

This is funkychicken.awk:

BEGIN { FS = "@" }
function joinArray(values, sep, len) {
        actualSep = "";
        for (i = 1; i <= len; i++) {
                result = result actualSep values[i];
                actualSep = sep;
        }
        return result;
}
function resetFunkyToken() {
        ftok = 0;
}
function funkyToken() {
        return "(" ++ftok ")";
}
function trim(text) {
        sub(/ *$/, "", text);
        return text;
}
{
        if ($2 in data) {
            resetFunkyToken();
            split(data[$2], existingValues, "@");
            for (f = 3; f <= 4; f++)
                    existingValues[f] = " " funkyToken() trim(existingValues[f]) " " funkyToken() $f;
            data[$2] = joinArray(existingValues, "@", NF);
        }
        else {
                data[$2] = $0;
        }
}
END {
        for (item in data)
                print data[item];
}

Then follow with a command to execute funkychicken.awk with said data and sort the output:

$ awk -f funkychicken.awk data.txt | sort
001 @ cat @ (1) makes a great pet (2) can jump very high @ (3) mice (4) fish
002 @ rat @ makes a great friend @ cheese
003 @ dog @ can guard the house @ chicken

Instead of using your funky tokens ①②③④⑤⑥⑦⑧⑨⑩ I went with the less funky (1)(2)....

share|improve this answer
1  
Good Solution, but I think OP wanted (1) and (2) on the last column as well i.e (1) mice (2) fish. –  jaypal Jan 9 '12 at 5:30

First, use sort to sort lines on the second column.

Second, use awk to output successive lines with the same second column as a single line with third and fourth columns concatenated as required.

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Ah, you want to flatten multiple records into one. I've got a python script to do that, available here. That version is set up to convert excel files to csv, along with some other things specific to that use case. For you, I'd do this:

import os
import sys
import csv
import argparse
from collections import defaultdict
from itertools import chain, izip_longest

def getunique(reader, uniqueFields, mergeFields):
    """Find all unique rows in the csv file, based on the unique fields given."""
    rows = defaultdict(list)
    for row in reader:
        unique = '|'.join([row[f] for f in reader.fieldnames if f in uniqueFields])
        merge = [row[f] for f in reader.fieldnames if f in mergeFields]
        rows[unique].append(merge)
    return rows 

if __name__ == "__main__":

    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Process an csv file, converting multiple rows to one.', version='%(prog)s 1.0')
    parser.add_argument('infile', type=str, help='excel input file')
    args = parser.parse_args()

    reader = csv.DictReader(open(args.infile, "rb"), dialect='excel')

    uniqueFields = []
    mergeFields = []
    for field in reader.fieldnames:
        tmp = raw_input("Is field {0} a: \nunique field? (1)\nignored field? (2)\nmerged field? (3)\n>> ".format(field))
        if tmp == '1':
            uniqueFields.append(field)
        elif tmp == '2':
            pass
        else:
            mergeFields.append(field)

    unique = getunique(reader, uniqueFields, mergeFields)

    fieldnames = uniqueFields
    lengths = [len(merge) for merge in unique.itervalues()]
    for i in range(1, max(lengths)+1):
        fieldnames.extend(['_'.join((field,str(i))) for field in mergeFields])

    writer = csv.DictWriter(open("export.csv", "wb"), fieldnames, dialect='excel')
    writer.writeheader()
    for unique, merge in unique.iteritems():
        currData = unique.split("|")
        for drug in merge:
            currData.extend(drug)
        currRow = izip_longest(fieldnames, currData, fillvalue='')
        writer.writerow(dict(currRow))

    ## clean up and finishing section
    del reader
    del writer

Edit: This second version does not add extra fields, and inputs the (1) markers requested. However, it makes an implicit assumption that the id field is ignored, and replaced with the current entry in the (unsorted) dictionary. This can be changed, of course, but there has been no info on which of the many ids is appropriate for rows with the same field 2. It also assumes that the id field is called id.

import os
import sys
import csv
import argparse
from collections import defaultdict
from itertools import chain, izip_longest

def getunique(reader, uniqueFields, mergeFields):
    """Find all unique rows in the csv file, based on the unique fields given."""
    rows = defaultdict(list)
    for row in reader:
        unique = '|'.join([row[f] for f in reader.fieldnames if f in uniqueFields])
        merge = [(f, row[f]) for f in reader.fieldnames if f in mergeFields]
        rows[unique].append(merge)
    return rows 

if __name__ == "__main__":

    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Process an csv file, converting multiple rows to one.', version='%(prog)s 1.0')
    parser.add_argument('infile', type=str, help='excel input file')
    args = parser.parse_args()

    reader = csv.DictReader(open(args.infile, "rb"), dialect='excel')

    uniqueFields = []
    mergeFields = []
    for field in reader.fieldnames:
        tmp = raw_input("Is field {0} a: \nunique field? (1)\nignored field? (2)\nmerged field? (3)\n>> ".format(field))
        if tmp == '1':
            uniqueFields.append(field)
        elif tmp == '2':
            pass
        else:
            mergeFields.append(field)

    unique = getunique(reader, uniqueFields, mergeFields)

    writer = csv.DictWriter(open("export.csv", "wb"), reader.fieldnames, dialect='excel')
    writer.writeheader()
    for rowID, (unique, merge) in enumerate(unique.iteritems()):
        currData = defaultdict(list)
        for field, data in izip_longest(fieldnames, currData, fillvalue=''):
            currData[field].append(data)
        for n,data in enumerate(merge):
            currData[data[0]].append("({0}) {1}".format(n+1, data[1]))
        currData['id'] = str(rowID + 1)
        currRow = {}
        for key,value in currData.iteritems():
            currRow[key] = ''.join(value)
        writer.writerow(currRow)

    ## clean up and finishing section
    del reader
    del writer
share|improve this answer

This might work for you:

sort -k3,3 -k1,1n file |
sed ':a;$!N;s/^\(\S*\s\)\(@[^@]*@\)\( +\)*\([^@]*\)@\( +\)*\([^\n]*\)\n\S*\s\2\([^@]*@\)\(.*\)/\1\2 +\4+\7 +\6 +\8/;ta;P;D' | 
sort -n | 
awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){if($i=="@")n=0;if($i=="+")$i="("++n")"}}1'
001 @ cat @ (1) makes a great pet (2) can jump very high @ (1) mice (2) fish
002 @ rat @ makes a great friend @ cheese
003 @ dog @ can guard the house @ chicken

Explanation:

  1. Input file is sorted by key then line number
  2. sed merges adjacent lines for columns 3 and 4 using + as a field marker
  3. Merged file is sorted again by line number
  4. awk converts field markers to numbers
share|improve this answer
1  
Very good one-liner. +1 –  user405725 Jan 13 '12 at 19:19

Here is a far shorter solution in Ruby. (This script requires Ruby 1.9, and will not work with Ruby 1.8)

filename   = "filename.txt" # change as appropriate
info,other = 2.times.map { Hash.new { |h,k| h[k] = [] }}
ids        = {}
File.readlines(filename).each do |line|
  id,word,i,o = line.split("@").map(&:strip)
  info[word]  << i
  other[word] << o
  ids[word] ||= id
end
ids.sort_by { |k,v| v }.each do |(word,id)|
  i = info[word].size > 1 ? (info[word].map.with_index  { |x,idx| "(#{idx+1}) #{x}" }.join(" ")) : info[word].first
  o = other[word].size > 1 ? (other[word].map.with_index  { |x,idx| "(#{idx+1}) #{x}" }.join(" ")) : other[word].first
  puts "#{id} @ #{word} @ #{i} @ #{o}"
end

Some commented that parsing CSV files is not as simple as splitting on a delimiter, but the format you show in the question is not CSV. I'm following the format you showed in the question.

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