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I'm trying to develop a class that supports an asynchronus method invocation. This is what I've come up with so far, however, I'm not sure if its the 'right way' of doing it.

I only want the async method to be executed once, it doesn't have to support multiple executions so I didn't use the AsyncOperationManager class.

Can someone who knows the async pattern well give me some feed back? Am I doing this the right way?

Any help would be appreciated as I haven't been able to find any information on single invocation async methods.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace ConsoleApplication1 {

    public delegate void WorkerDelegate();

    class Program {

        static void Main(string[] args) {

            String taskId = new Guid().ToString();

            AsyncTest test = new AsyncTest();
            test.DoSomethingLongAsyncCompleted += new AsyncCompletedEventHandler(test_DoSomethingLongAsyncCompleted);
            test.DoSomethingLongProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(test_DoSomethingLongProgressChanged);
            test.DoSomethingLongAsync(ItsOver, taskId);

            // Cancel after 2 seconds
            Thread.Sleep(2000);
            test.DoSomethingLongCancelAsync();

            Console.ReadLine(); //Pause the console window
        }

        static void test_DoSomethingLongProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e) {
            Console.WriteLine("Percent complete: " + e.ProgressPercentage);
        }

        static void test_DoSomethingLongAsyncCompleted(object sender, AsyncCompletedEventArgs e) {
            Console.WriteLine("Cancelled? " + e.Cancelled);
            Console.WriteLine("Task ID: " + (String)e.UserState);
        }

        static void ItsOver(IAsyncResult r) {
            Console.WriteLine("Task ID: " + (String)r.AsyncState);
        }
    }

    class AsyncTest {

        IAsyncResult _asyncResult = null;
        Object _stateObj = null;
        AsyncCallback _callBackDelegate;

        public event ProgressChangedEventHandler DoSomethingLongProgressChanged;
        public event AsyncCompletedEventHandler DoSomethingLongAsyncCompleted;


        public IAsyncResult DoSomethingLongAsync(AsyncCallback userCallback, Object userState) {

            if (_stateObj != null)
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Method already started");

            WorkerDelegate worker = new WorkerDelegate(DoSomethingLong);

            _callBackDelegate = userCallback;
            _asyncResult = worker.BeginInvoke(null, userState);

            return _asyncResult;
        }

        public void DoSomethingLongCancelAsync() {
            _stateObj = null;
        }

        public void DoSomethingLong() {

            // Set state object if method was called synchronously
            if (_stateObj == null)
                _stateObj = new Object();

            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {

                //If state object is null, break out of operation
                if (_stateObj == null) break;

                Thread.Sleep(1000);
                Console.WriteLine("Elapsed 1sec");

                if (DoSomethingLongProgressChanged != null) {
                    // Percentage calculation for demo only :-)
                    DoSomethingLongProgressChanged(this, new ProgressChangedEventArgs(i+1 * 10, _stateObj));
                }
            }

            // Only execute if method was called async
            if (_callBackDelegate != null) {
                _callBackDelegate(_asyncResult);

                DoSomethingLongAsyncCompleted(
                    this,
                    new AsyncCompletedEventArgs(null, (_stateObj == null), _asyncResult.AsyncState)
                );
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are two main ways to handle async model, check out this MSDN article on the Asynchronous Programming Model. It seems that you're trying to use the IAsyncResult technique. I tend to use this only for low level System IO operations.

For UI or an API, I tend to go for the Event Model as I think its easier to handle. For your case, you could send an event to the QueueUserWorkItem, keep track of the SynchronizationContext and use it when firing a completed event. (If you're using WPF you can use the DispatchObject instead).

Here is a ContactLoader class that I've used previously.

public class ContactLoader
{
    public List<Contact> Contacts { get; private set; }
    private readonly IRepository<Contact> contactsRepository;

    public ContactLoader(IRepository<Contact> contactsRepository)
    {
        this.contactsRepository = contactsRepository;
    }

    public event AsyncCompletedEventHandler Completed;
    public void OnCompleted(AsyncCompletedEventArgs args)
    {
        if (Completed != null)
            Completed(this, args);
    }

    public bool Cancel { get; set; }

    private SynchronizationContext _loadContext;
    public void LoadAsync(AsyncCompletedEventHandler completed)
    {
        Completed += completed;
        LoadAsync();
    }
    public void LoadAsync()
    {
        if (_loadContext != null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("This component can only handle 1 async request at a time");

        _loadContext = SynchronizationContext.Current;

        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(_Load));
    }

    public void Load()
    {
        _Load(null);
    }

    private void _Load(object state)
    {
        Exception asyncException = null;
        try
        {
            Contacts = contactsRepository.GetAll();

            if (Cancel)
            {
                _Cancel();
                return;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            asyncException = ex;
        }

        if (_loadContext != null)
        {
            AsyncCompletedEventArgs e = new AsyncCompletedEventArgs(asyncException, false, null);
            _loadContext.Post(args =>
            {
                OnCompleted(args as AsyncCompletedEventArgs);
            }, e);
            _loadContext = null;
        }
        else
        {
            if (asyncException != null) throw asyncException;
        }
    }

    private void _Cancel()
    {
        if (_loadContext != null)
        {
            AsyncCompletedEventArgs e = new AsyncCompletedEventArgs(null, true, null);
            _loadContext.Post(args =>
            {
                OnCompleted(args as AsyncCompletedEventArgs);
            }, e);
            _loadContext = null;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. Although, all the articles I've seen on MSDN don't discuss single Invokations. I'll check this one out. Thanks again. –  Vince Panuccio May 16 '09 at 1:41
    
I added some code update with sample EventModel. See if this helps. –  bendewey May 16 '09 at 1:45
    
Thanks heaps for the code sample. Ill keep reading on to see what I can find. I might consider just using the BackgroundWorker class instead. –  Vince Panuccio May 16 '09 at 5:47

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