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I'm looking at an old web app I wrote and it is taking about an hour to read 4500 records from a DataTable so it can write them to a CSV file. I feel there has to be some way to improve this.

Few things to note:

  • The DataTable contains... 376 columns

    At least, I think that's what Excel's NL column converts to. I just looked up the column count now and had no idea there were so many. Our software vendor hasn't realized the value of dynamic sql statements for this process, so every software "upgrade" just keeps adding more columns rather than only selecting the ones needed.

  • I cannot alter the SQL statement that generates the data

  • Depending on the data type, the data needs to be formatted in a specific format

  • Data does contains special characters, such as commas

  • The slow part is reading the data. Getting the data from the SQL server and writing it to a CSV is fast.

Here's the code. Forgive the mess, I wrote it back when I didn't know what I was doing and when I still was working in VB

Function ReadDataTableForCSV(dt as DataTable)

    Dim sb = New StringBuilder()
    Dim dataTypes As New Dictionary(Of String, Integer)

    ' Header Row
    For i as Integer = 0 to dt.Columns.Count - 1
        Dim col as DataColumn = dt.Columns(i)

        Dim t = col.DataType
        If t is GetType(Boolean) Then
            dataTypes.Add(i, 1)
        Else If t is GetType(Decimal) Then
            dataTypes.Add(i, 2)
        Else
            dataTypes.Add(i, 3)
        End If

        sb.Append(String.Format("""{0}""", col.ColumnName))
        sb.Append(Iif(i = dt.Columns.Count - 1, vbLf, ","))

    Next

    ' Items
    For Each row as DataRow in dt.Rows
        For i As Integer = 0 To dt.Columns.Count - 1
            Select dataTypes(i)
                Case 1
                sb.Append(String.Format("""{0}""", CInt(row(i))))
            Case 2
                sb.Append(String.Format("""{0}""", FormatNumber(row(i), 2, , , 0)))
            Case 3
                sb.Append(String.Format("""{0}""", row(i)))
            End Select

            sb.Append(Iif(i = dt.Columns.Count - 1, vbLf, ","))
      Next
    Next

End Function

Edit: Removed code not related to the problem

share|improve this question
1  
First things first - there are two very separate sections of code here; reading from the data table, and writing to the disk. Which is slow? (I would definitely tidy up the file writing code, mind you. Simply File.WriteAllText would do it in a single call.) –  Jon Skeet Jan 3 '12 at 15:03
    
@JonSkeet Sorry I should have clarified that. The part reading from the DataTable is the slow part. –  Rachel Jan 3 '12 at 15:45
    
Actually, I was mistaken before: there are obviously three separate sections of code - getting the DataTable (your call to GetMyDataTable), reading from it, and then writing. Is it definitely the reading from the datatable which is slow rather than creating it to start with? –  Jon Skeet Jan 3 '12 at 15:48
    
@JonSkeet Yes, it's definitely the reading portion. Originally it wrote the DataTable directly to the file, and I could watch the file size grow as it built the file and know that's the part that is taking an hour or so. And thanks for the WriteAllText() method, I wasn't aware that existed :) –  Rachel Jan 3 '12 at 15:53
1  
Since you can't change the query pulling the data out you may be out of luck trying to speed this up. An hour to pull 4500 records seems like an awfully long time. Could you post the code that generates the datatable? Without seeing that piece there's not much we can do to help you out. –  Tim Jan 3 '12 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is how I would rewrite it:

  1. Allocate the stringbuilder memory up front.

  2. Change the data types from a dictionary to a byte array and only use values 1 and 2; value 3 will now be 0, which will be the default for items in the array.

  3. Use the Ordinal property from the column rather than a separate index.

  4. Streamline the evaluations inside the loop for item and line separators.

  5. Use Decimal.ToString instead of FormatNumber.

  6. Remove iifs (these are probably optimized by the compiler, but I am still leery of them from the early VB days)

Here's the code:

Function ReadDataTableForCSV(dt As DataTable)

    Dim sb As New StringBuilder(100000000)
    Dim dataTypes As Byte()

    ReDim dataTypes(dt.Columns.Count - 1)

    ' Header Row
    For Each col As DataColumn In dt.Columns
        If sb.Length <> 0 Then
            sb.Append(",")
        End If

        Select Case col.DataType.ToString
            Case "System.Boolean"
                dataTypes(col.Ordinal) = 1

            Case "System.Decimal"
                dataTypes(col.Ordinal) = 2

                ' Everything else defaults to 0

        End Select

        sb.Append("""").Append(col.ColumnName).Append("""")
    Next

    sb.AppendLine()
    ' or  sb.Append(vbLf)

    ' Items
    For Each row As DataRow In dt.Rows
        For i As Integer = 0 To dt.Columns.Count - 1
            If i <> 0 Then
                sb.Append(",")
            End If

            sb.Append("""")
            Select Case dataTypes(i)
                Case 1
                    If CBool(row(i)) Then
                        sb.Append("1")
                    Else
                        sb.Append("0")
                    End If

                Case 2
                    sb.Append(CDec(row(i)).ToString("F"))

                Case Else
                    sb.Append(row(i))

            End Select

            sb.Append("""")
        Next

        sb.AppendLine()
        ' or  sb.Append(vbLf)
    Next

End Function
share|improve this answer
    
Its almost time for me to head home today but I am very interested in giving your suggestions a try tomorrow and seeing if it runs any faster. Thanks. –  Rachel Jan 3 '12 at 20:56
    
Wow, I have no idea which one of your suggestions cut back on the execution time, but it went from taking almost an hour down to less than a minute! I was unable to allocate the memory up front for the StringBuilder, however apparently that wasn't the big issue. Thank you so much! –  Rachel Jan 4 '12 at 13:26

Check out Filehelpers. It's very fast, handles quoted fields, and simplifies both reading and writing delimited and fixed-width files.

A walkthrough can be found on Codeproject.

If you read records from the database into strongly typed classes using an ORM like Dapper then you can hand the array of strongly typed classes from the ORM, which would be decorated with the DelimitedRecord and FieldConverter attributes, to the Filehelpers Engine.

The download link on Sourceforge and the Filehelpers website is a bit old. It works, but I'd recommend pulling the latest source from Sourceforge.

EDIT

Nothing stands out as being the one single performance hit. Maybe it's a collection of small hits? Give this a shot.

  • Rather than populate and enumerate a DataTable, enumerate the DataReader directly. Less boxing.
  • If you're on the latest version of VB.NET, use the ternary IF rather than IIF. It's type safe.
  • Fewer String.Formats.
  • Fewer dictionary lookups. I imaging a type check is faster than a dictionary lookup. Maybe someone can speak to this?
  • Fewer implicit type conversions.

This is a shot in the dark rewrite. :)

Function ReadDataTableForCSV(dr As SqlDataReader) As String
    Dim fieldCount As Integer = dr.FieldCount
    Dim sb = New StringBuilder()

    ' Header Row
    For i As Integer = 0 To fieldCount - 1
        sb.AppendFormat("""{0}""", dr.GetName(i))
        sb.Append(If(i = fieldCount - 1, vbLf, ","))
    Next

    ' Items
    While dr.Read()
        For i As Integer = 0 To fieldCount - 1
            Dim t As Type = dr.GetFieldType(i)

            sb.Append("""") 'quoted cell
            If t Is GetType(Boolean) Then
                sb.Append(If(dr.GetBoolean(i), "1", "0"))
            ElseIf t Is GetType(Decimal) Then
                sb.Append(dr.GetDecimal(i).ToString("#.##"))
            Else
                sb.Append(dr(i))
            End If
            sb.Append("""") 'quoted cell

            sb.Append(If(i = fieldCount - 1, vbLf, ","))
        Next
    End While

    Return sb.ToString()
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
I see you used the ASP.NET tag. If my memory serves me well, you can tell Filehelpers to write straight to the ResponseStream rather than write to a file. The user would have no idea that the file they're downloading is being generated AS it's downloaded. –  Nick VanderPyle Jan 3 '12 at 15:20
    
I'm sorry, I should have been more clear in my question. The slow part is reading the DataTable, not writing the CSV file. –  Rachel Jan 3 '12 at 15:47
    
I see. You also mentioned that there are 370+ columns, which would translate into an unreasonably large class. My answer does not fit your needs. :) –  Nick VanderPyle Jan 3 '12 at 16:33
    
I edited my answer with a shot in the dark rewrite. It removes the intermediate DataTable. There's less implicit type conversion. The decimal formatting might not be correct. –  Nick VanderPyle Jan 3 '12 at 17:34
    
Thanks :) I originally did the type check in the loop, and moved it to a dictionary to see if it would run any faster (it doesn't). The original version also had no string.formats (it was all stuff like """" + row(i) + """"). I will see how it runs using a DataReader instead of a DataTable, and try using the GetBoolean() and GetDecimal() instead of using implicit type conversions. –  Rachel Jan 3 '12 at 17:41

if getting the datatable is the bottleneck and you cannot alter the sql statement and the results are returned as datatable, there is not much that can be done.

if you can control how the results are returned then return an ienumerable. where T is either a POCO or IDataRecord, something and use deferred execution. this will keep memory consumption low as you will only load the record as you consume it.

reading the data may look like this

while(reader.Reader())
{
    yield return reader; // or reader.ConvertRecordToObject<T>(); //extension method
}

then you can foreach the results to write out to a csvfile

foreach(var record in GetEnumerationOfRecords())
{
     WriteToCsv(record);
}

this still leaves the issue of the sql statement, which is most likely causing the bulk of the performance problem, but you cannot do anything about that.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is definitely not the SQL statement. I have tested a few different ways and the performance problem is in reading the data table. If I comment out the foreach section which loops through the data table and writes the results to the StringBuilder, it runs in a few seconds. My problem is not memory consumption either. It is the performance - a file should not take an hour to generate. –  Rachel Jan 3 '12 at 20:54
    
then, if the option exists, don't return a datatable. i would still recommend using deferred execution. –  Jason Meckley Jan 3 '12 at 20:58
    
Thanks, but I tried using a DataReader instead of a DataTable and it didn't change the execution time –  Rachel Jan 3 '12 at 21:17
1  
have you profiled the code so you know exactly where your bottleneck is? –  Jason Meckley Jan 3 '12 at 21:19
1  
a profiler will pinpoint exactly where the bottleneck is. JetBrains dotTrace and Ants Profiler are both excellent tools. –  Jason Meckley Jan 4 '12 at 13:01

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